Skip to main content

Full text of "Boone County Recorder"

See other formats


1,1111 >>> i-^mmmmmemmmmmmmmmemmmm 



— — ^^^K 



BOONE COUNTYRECORDER 



Val. XXXXVI I I l 

I 1 = 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3, 1924 $1.50 Per Year 



No i e 



WASHINGTON COmmENT. 

William Mather Lewis, President 
of George Washington University, 
saps that "the safety of the Nation 
depends on the reiognition of the 
need of patriotil edulation in the 
schools of the country." 

White school teachers in South 
Carolina receive an avtrage daily 
wage of $2.75, according to a recent 
study made by a university class in 
school administration. Compared to 
the teachers' wages, statistics pre- 
sented show that South Carolina 
plumbers receive an average daily 
'wage of $11.25, steamfitters $11.25, 
stonecutters $8, bricklayers $7.20, 
sheet metal workers $6.40 to $8, and 
carpenters $4 to $6. 

While South Carolina's statistics 
may not be the average for the en- 
tire country, they are indicative,of a 
fact which is weH recognized; that 
the teaching profession is badly 
underpaid. 

"But," says' the economist, "the 
law of supply and demand takes 
care of the situation; teachers are 
willing to accept little, therefore lit- 
tle is paid." But the economist for- 
gets that teachers are willing to ac- 
cept little because the country is 
satisfied with teachers willing to ac- 
cept little! We are willing to have 
pur children taught by teachers of- 
ten but little less ignorant than their 
scholars. 

With a full recognition of the 
wonderful band of devoted men and 
women who are well trained, able, 
anxious to serve, who teach because 
they would rather teach than do ony- 
thing else, it is nevertheless a fact 
that, taken as a whole, our schools 
are taught by those who have not 
prepared for that vocation, who are 
not able to teach well, because they 
know little, who are acceptable be- 
cause they are cheap, not because 
they are able. 

Can any one teach patriotism? If 
we are willing to have patriotic 
ideals inculcated by men and women 
who could not stand an examination 



T *NNING FOR 1924. 

For a multitude of concerns, Jan- 
uary 1 begins a new business as well 
as calendar year. The manager a and 
executives are laying careful plans 
as to what they will accomplish dur- 
ing the new twelve months. Mar's 
are aimed at which their trade is to 
reach. If salesmen do not make 
their expected total, they are likely 
to have to explain the reason. 

So in every life it is a good idea 
to lay out definite ends which one 
hopes to attain in the coming year. 
People should form plans for im- 
proving their mental equipment, 
their training for their occupation, 
their savings of money, their phy- 
sical health. 

There is too much tendency to 
drift along from day to day without 
planning for the future. January 1 
is a good time to take account of 
stock of life, and decide whether the 
past year brought all the gains it 
should, and what can be done to se- 
cure greater results in 1924. 

THE PASSING YEAR. 

Many people, looking back at the 
year 1923, will say it has been un- 
satisfactory. They will decide that 
with Europe in turmoil, little pro- 
gress has been made toward bring- 
ing the world to a better state of 
mind, which has acted as a drag on 
the welfare of the United States. 

Yet notable results have been 
achieved. The business and indus- 
trial progress of the country has 
been such, that it is generally admit- 
ted that the United States can get 
along with lower taxes. It seen* 
probable, unless Congress is dead- 
locked, that the burdens resting up- 
on the people will be lightened. Any- 
way the big war debt is being re- 
duced, which means that better days 
are in store. 

It is also significant, that there 
have been no very serious labor trou- 
bles in this country. The threat of 
extended coal strikes was quickly re 



MARY JANE ROBBINS. 

Mary Jant* R obh ina , wife of Ad 
d=son Robbins, died at her home in 
B-.irlington, Tuesday night, De^. 2 ( ; 
I i'ii, after a week's illness of pneu- 
monia, in her 87th year. 

She was born in East Bend, Sept., 
22, 1836, and had been a resident of 
the county all her life. She was n 
daughter of Steve Mock. 

She was married to Addison Rob- 
bins Dtc. 21, 1852, and she and her 
husband had lived happily together 
for more than seventy-one years. To 
this union six children were born, 
Mrs. Sarah Mitchell, Frank and S. J. 
Robbins, Mrs. Nancy Batchelor, Mrs. 
Lizzie Eddins, and Keene Robbins, 
who preceded her to the grave many 
years ago 



NEW YF**»'« DAY 

The need of getting a conveniens 
division of time into days and years 
which correspond with the move- 
ments of the earth and sun, is not 
su cient explanation of the New 
Year's festival. 

We seek constantly a realization 
of completeness, of a beginning, 3 
middle and the end. Life which is 
formless, have form given it. It 
must have its stopping places, where 
it relaxes by a fire and i* genial. 

The New Year's festival is an inn 
which folks reach at the end of a 
lor.t journey. They sit a while and 
are merry. They take up their 
journey again. 

As a matter of convenience we 
call January 1st New Year, wher-as 
a ruttter of fact every day is a New 
Year, 



THE BLACK CLOUD. 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 

With thousands of "fake" phjs 
cians and, according to Dr. 
40,000 "unfit" surgeons, *dd«d tat* 
several hundred correspondeaann-- 
school prescription elerks, poor, aiefc- 
and suffering humanitp stands at 



Our Country and its constitution 
have withstood successfully the tre- 
mendou" -♦'a'P of readjustment af- 
ter the World War and during the 
past year the shocks occasioned by 

the death of a President, a national j as much show as the "snow ball 
coal strike, agitation for ex-service ' hell" that an eminent Episco 
men's bonus and farmers' ionus, an ' clergyman referred to last week. . ' 
earthquake calamity in Japan, a n- j Under the circumstances anti-vivi- 
nancial and industrial collapse in sectionists should withdraw their ot>- 
China.not to mention the European jettions to letting the "students"' 

situation all this without serious , experiment on dumb animals. The* 

disturbance in our business, indus- : mist experiment to obtain exper- 
trial or financial circles. The great- I tones, and it maysa.e a few thous- 
est menace to Our Country is cans- | and lives to let the dog, eat, rabbit 



ed by boring from within and under- 
mining the character and initiative 
of the American people by socialistic 
I a" life" time i's the only 1 , and communistic experiments. These 

undertaken in the name 



or mouse be the goat. 



and homes 
leaps and 



The robbery of stores 
of goods is growing by 
After a short funeral service at i period of existence about which we j experiments, undertaken in the name , bounds. There are well-known plac^ 
the home the remains were taken to need to be concerned, for our lives of municipal, state and federal own- to sell these goods or the lobber^ 

do not ebb and flow like ocean tides '. ership and operation of industries j would quit the busmess. The court 
nor change with the seasons. come about as the result of 

Life is a whole, and will be as ' brow theorists and political agitn- 
perfect as we choose to make it. | tions. Once established and fastened 
The more careful our preparation j upon the people, always with a chain 
for taking up the duty of living the j around the necks <,t the taxpayers, 
more readily can we adapt ourselves i no one is responsible tat their sucv 
to the wavs of the world, and great- ! cessful conduct or maintenance. The 

! theorists and agitators have new fish 



Big Bone, Friday, Dec. 28th, at 11 
o'clock, and buried in the cemetery 
at that place. 

She was a member of the Meth- 
odist church and the funeral was in 
charge of her pastor, Rev. Gillespie. 
She is survived by her husband and 
five children all residents of this 
county. 

Philip Taliaferro, of Erlanger, had, 
charge of the funeral arrangements. 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Louisville, Ky. — Prevention and 
eradication of disease as more im- 
portant than attempts to cure, with 

the goal in view of prolonging the | are going to stumble and fall — as cit- 
lives of Kentuckians by many years, ! izens, as states, and as nations mis- 
fca the program for 1924 just an-, takes will be made. 



er will be our usefulness as well as 
our share of comfort and peace. 

Custom has designated New Year's 
nay as a time for startmg-tn-er again 
— as a day for beginning a new ef- 
fort — a determination to rise above 
past weaknesses and failures. A long 
time ago Oliver Goldsmith said: "Our 
greatest glory is not in never falling, 
but in rising every time we fall." We 



moved by compromises. Both parties 
on American history, how can we decided that it was beter to adjust 



expect our children to grow up pa- 
triots? If Dr. Lewis is right and 



than to fight. This has been a great 
assistance in preventing an indus- 



patriotism taught in the schools is | trial depression 

more important than the usunl | i n the world field, while the proph- 
school subjects, is it not high time i ets have been predicting wars and 
we looked to our school budgets, to j more wars, very little disposition for 
make sure they are large enough to j actual fighting has been shown. It 
buy the services of those who under- ' has been proved that no matter how- 
stand and can teach that love of ' much political leaders may brandish 
country, without which all Ameri- ! their weapons and utter their men- 
can education is useless? | aces, the people have no stomach for 

- ■ ■*■ ■ { more fighting. As long as they 

HIGHEST COURT IN keep that attitude, there will be no 



KENTUCKY UPHOLDS 
TOBACCO POOL LAW 

Bingham co-oprravivr mar- 



nounced by Dr. A. T. McCormack, ] 
Secretary of the State Board of 
Health. 

The purpose of the campaign 
among the Kentucky doctors and lay- 
men, is an examination of every 
man, woman and child on their 
birthdays. This would assure an an- 
nual physical examination. In not i 
fyirrg the docc-"~ "f rhefc , — - ^.i «.oe 
move toward longevity, Dr. McCor- 
mack says: 

"If you are careful, painstaking 
and conscientious, it will mean more 
to the health of our people and to 
the ultimate success of our profes- 
sion, as its guardian, than any other 
campaign that ever was started. It 
is important that all routine exam- 
inations should include a * careful 
study of the teeth and throat. It has 
been definitely demonstrated that a 
j majority of the most severe infec- 
i tions which cause invalidism and 
| death, come from abcesses of the 
\ teeth and from infeited tonsils. 

The world's sorest spot is the ' "In this State, every patient suf- 
Franoo-German situation. The year \ feting from chronic ill"'\s.s .should 

ma- 



high- j in the large cities should sting the 
men hard who are buying and deal- 
ing in stolen goods, and robbery ©i 
this kind would cease. They would 
not steal goods if there was not m 
good market for them. Laws should, 
be passed with real teeth in them U>-. 
handle the man who buys stolen 
goods. 



to fry, new experiments to propose. 

They are neither executives nor ad- | — — — 

fflinistrator^H-- and not concerned j _ The .Christ mas e xerc ises 

about results. Their only aspiration I Burlington M. E. church, 
is to get political power at the hands j evening, Dec. 24th, was 
of the people, but always at the ex 



Hm < 



wars. 



e mngnarn co-oprrax.vr „ ., - ^ has heen devoted by those two cou ,,_ | have a roh tine examination for nu 
g act, under whichthe Burley ( trjes tQ a ^ of theif cthv j , aria and lhe int estinal parasites, 

ceo Growers Co-operative As- . gt th Both have acted unwjsel -Conservatism should be the rul 



yet sometimes people 'and nations 
have to try out such experiences be- 
fore they can see the light of rea- 
son. They have learned about how- 
far they can go as the result of an- 
tagonistic measures. There are signs 
that they are now going to make a 
little step toward co-operation. 

SCORE LAWllOLATIONS. 

Declaring that law violations have 



The 
ketin_ 
Tobacco 

sociation and the darw tobacco pool 
were formed, was declared constitu- 
tional and valid by the Court of 
Appeals of Kentucky, the highest 
judicial tribunal in the state, in a 
unanimous decision here today, 
Judge Ernest S. Clarge writing the 
opinion, which sustains the act at 
every point. 

The Bingham law not only is held 
constitutional by the decision, which 
was handed down in the case of Lee 
Potter, of McCracken county, against 
the dark pool, but the right of the , becQme ,. f that m 

associations organized under the law | _o;.,:„i„ _.;_j _ i_„., 

to the delivery of crops pledged to 
them, the right to damages and to 
injunctions to compel the delivery of 
crops is sustained. 

The Bingham act is regarded as 
the most far-reaching of any of the 
state co-operative marketing laws in 
the protection it gives the co-opera- 
tive associations, and the fact that 
it is sustained by thehighest court in 
the state will probably end the prac- 
tice of some disloyal members in 
dumping their crops on the auction 
floors. 

The court holds that the Bingham 
act is h ot In restraint of trade, that 



le 
in suggesting surgical operations; 
but this should include the conserv- 
ing of health. Carefully and skill- 
fully made and sympathetically and 
definitely explained to the patients, 
ssteniatic physical .examination will 
do more to promote the public health 
than any other movement which has 
ever been undertaken by the medical 
profession." 

GET BEHIND YOUR TEACHER 



The need of the hour is good citi- 
zenship — and that does not mean fol- 
lowing blindly ambitious and defining 
men with little sympathy in the per- 
petuation of republican institutions, 
men who have no particular interest 
in the general welfare of the people 
or the advancement of civilization 
and Christsianity except as it con- 
tributes to their personal polit#al 
power or wealth. mi*- 

,# .<>very map *>«'' woman could be 
made to feel and realize in every 
fibre of their being that they are in- • 
dividual stockholders in this great co- 
operative government — that no man 
on earth has more right to his say-so 
than you have, then, and not till then, 
will good citizenship be fully recog- 
nized and pure democracy rule. 

This is a fitting season to discard 
the mental attitude of self-deprecia- 
tion and demand the best there is in 
self and in the world. 

May it be a Happy and Prosperous 
New Year to all reader'; and to i;ll 
peoples, is the sincer e wish of the 
RECORDER 

The Democratic party is drier than 
ever — drier by several wringings ap- 
parently, than it was last summer 
when eight Democratic states stood 
out boldly foT modification of the 
Volstead act, and when it was an- 
nounced that ex -president Wilson 
was drawing up a platform that 
would contain such a plank. A re- 
cent canvas of the states shows that 
29 out of -15 states are opposed to 
any modification; 15 are non-com- 
mittal and 3 make no reply. As the 
cards lay to day there will be no wet 
plank in any platform. 



pense of the governed and the con- 
sumer who must produce the wealth 
to pay the bills. Continued agitation 
for so-called nationalizing of indus- 
tries, and various forms of govern- 
ment ownership, weakens industry 
and the entire economic structure by- 
injecting an element of political un- 
certainty, investments fall off, enter- 
prises are not undertaken becaus • 
the legitimate functions of private 
business are interferred with by po- 
litical encroachment. Politics anJ 
business simply do not mix. Serious 
minded thinking business men, who 
plan great industrial undertakings, 
?■*£•* «.avK«»I inust be earned u«ek 
over long periods of years, find their 
efforts blighted and paralyzed by 
the uncertainties of political jug- 
glery. The multiplicity of govern- 
ment activities, creation of more reg- 
ulatory commissions, enactment of 
more laws shaking and destroying tKe 
foundations of individual enterprise-, 
are the black clouds looming up on 
the national horizon. 



Monday- 

a decides? 
success. Everything went off in "ap- 
ple pie" order, and the entire pao- 
gram was enjoyed by all those pres- 
ent. Too much praise cannot be gi#— 
en those who had charge of the pro-— 
gram. The singers acquitted them- 
selves in fine fashion. Distribution of 
presents were made from the Christ- 
■has tree. 



officials condone lawlessness, and 
asserting that self-constituted law- 
enforcers are plunging the nation 
down the path of destruction, the 
Georgia Baptist convention at its 
closing session here called on every 
member of the denomination in Geor- 
gia to exert his influence to rectify 
a condition which is jeopardizing the 
well-being of the United States. 

Introduced by W. W. Gaines, pres- 
ident of the Atlanta board of educa- 
tion and chairman of the Baptist 
program committee, who presided a 
resolution was passed by the conven- 
tion as its final act. The resolution 



One reason advanced by the coun- 
try people ,1'or leaving the farm and 
jamming ,nto the big cities is th-u 
there are no advantages in the coun- 
try. To our way of thinking this i 
a wrong idea. A man on the farm, 
he is thrifty and industrious, can 
have an automobile, a phon o graph. .: 
radio, electric lights, piano, tele- 
phone, play grounds for the children, 
pure water, milk and fresh vegeta- 
bles. There are not many "cliff 
dweller.-." in the cities who are en- 
joying these luxuries. It is true in 
the cities there are better- school fa- 
cilities, but this is also coming to the 
country. Some of Efiese days there 
is going to be a swing to the citii" 
try, and then land will be too high 
I lor the man with ordinary means to 
buy. 



the contract is a mutual one and that 
the growers must comply with their 
part of it by turning over their crops 
to be marketed by the association. 



was ordered printed in the Christian ' be fa 
Index, and copies sent to everv]* -11 ' 



Baptist pastor in the state with the 
request that it be read to the con- 
gregations. Request was also made 

l that the message be given to all 
THE LOSS CAUSED BY COLDS j c0lmty papers *,. ^'J 

The majority of people in the U. The prohibition laws are violated 
S. are more or less subject to the with impunity in both high places 
disagreeable ailment commonly call- j i.nd low, the resolution declared; it 
ed a "cold." Many folks get this j was stated that this disregard of one 
malady a number of times during I statute would lead to a general con- 



the year and are rendered very mis 
erable. Some have to go to bed. 
Others would be better off if they 
did. By keeping at work they get 
all tired out, and are not able to re- 
sist more serious infections. The 
working power of the country must 
be considerably lowered by this ail- 
ment. 



tempt for law and 
thority. 



constituted au- 



MORE THAN 96,000 

MEMBERS NOW IN 
-. THE BURLEY POOL 



Now that the holidays are over, 
the children have had a restful and 
happy vacation from school work, 
the parents have dedicated them- 
selves anew to th? k'nd of "peace on 
earth" which makes for a better 
world for their children, and we 
have r.ll settled down to a term of 
enthusiastic accomplishment, isn't it 
a good time for parents and school 
trustees to show their appreciation 
of the work of the teacher? Next to 
the parents no one_is so interested 
in the children's welfare,- so devoted 
to their general growth and develop- 
ment as well as their school educa- 
tion a s the teacher. Her work will j 
more effective if the children 
w that the parents and rusttees 
ocliei e in» her, trust her judgment, 
j'lid back her up in her ideals and 
her decisions. She will be happier 
as well as more effective in d o i ng 
it if the appreciation that is in the 
hearts of the people of the commun- 
ity finds expression occasionally in 
words, in occasional hospitalities ex- 
tended, and in other small acts of 
consideration. Get behind your teach- 
er. 

A large delegation of citizens 
from this part of the State will go 
to Frankfort next Monday to boost 
Samuel W. Adams, Kenton county 
Representative, for Speaker of the 
House of Representatives. The dele- 



HELP YOURSELF. 

Do you expect to see the end of 
1924? 

You may, and then ou may not. 
But if you are as wise as others give 
you credit for being, you will take 
ordinary precautions in your efforts 
to live out another year of life. 

Eat simple food, and don't gorge. 
.Masticate your food thoroughly — 



Edwin M. Gaines, a former Boone 
county boy, but now of Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, was a winner of a $500 
prize ocered by the Wisconsin New* 
to the owner of the best home. There 
were three $500 prizes divided into 
three classes — A. B. and C. Mr. 
Gaines was first in Class C, the qual- 
ifications for which called for *"">■«.« 



Robert W. Gaines, son of Mr. an* 
Mrs. A. W. Gaines, of Erlanger, and 
Miss Shirley, daughter of S. W. To- 
lin ,of Burlington, were married last. 
Friday evening at Latonia, by Rer.. 
H. C. Runyan, of the Christiam 
church. Their many friends ias 
Boone county join with the Recor- 
der in wishing them a long, happy 
i. .-' ;.::;. ;:crous journey through hf«_ 

Five young ladies of the Peters- 
burg Christian church choir, chaper- 
oned by Rev. R. H. Carter, visiteJf 
Burlington, last Thursday evening: 
and entertained a crowd at- D. R_. 
B'.ythe's store with several selections-. 
in a beautiful manner. These. youngs 
1. dies deserve great praise for their- 
sweet voices. Come again, and sta>T 
Ringer. 



W. W. Goodridge, of the Hebror-i 
neighborhood, was a visitor to. 'Ik? 
- Hub last Friday. He made tbtr- tie— 
Harder office a pleas.un call ana' re- 
newed Mrs. Fannie Tanner's sub- 
scription for another year. Mrs. Tan- 
ner has been B loyal friend of the> 
Elecorde? for many years, 

Vil'gn Gaines who has been rep— 
■•e-cnting the National Cash Regi-^- 
..-. v .)., of Dayton, Ohio, as a ialm> 
Oan at Oakland, Cala., for the pass; 
years has been at name with hus 
areata, Mr. and Mrs. -J. E. Gaines^ 
out on tije Petersburg i-ike, for sev— 
•.al days. 



I Asa Cason has sold his farm of 10S 
acres on tne Burlington and Water- 
loo pike, about three miles from Bnc*- 
lington, to Samuel Petitt. Possession 

■ to be given March 1st. Price not 
known. 



| costing over $14,000. A copy of 
j the News carrying a picture of Ed- 
I win and his $14,000 mansion was re- 

or.e dr.y la,t U P" 

t'Ull'l 



The reason most people go to sleep* 
in church is because the preacher: 
pitches his sermon too high and it in- 
going over their heads, and in trying 
to grasp it their brains become wearjp- 
and they want to sleep to rest theim 



.chew it twifp r.s long as you have ' ' eiv f d at v th,s n " Cl ' 1 
been in the habit of doing. **«*■ _Y ^^ Ml U ' 1 '' " H 



Membership in the Burley To 

j bacco Growers Co-operative Associa- gation will be accompanied " by 

If people wonld avoid the causes tlon . not counting the contracts of band. Mr. Adams is a former 

that lead to colds, they would save Persons not growing tobacco wh.» Boone county boy, who has made a 

a great deal of discomfort and some have signed contract* out of friend- success at the Kenton county bar 

peril. | 8h 'P ( or th « Association und not and his many friends in old Boone 

The people who live out of doors counting employees of the Associa- wish him success in his race, and he 

as much as possible, who take plen- tion » almost all of whom have sign- feels confident he will win Mr. Ad- 

edcontracts totalled Friday 96,257, an.s has received many letters from 

according to a statement given out Representatives in all sections of the 

by William Collhns, ch>f of the State assuring him of their support. 
field service division. 



fresh water. 

Get the habit of deep breathing. 

Exercise for half an hoar each 
day. and take a brisk wulk before 
breakfast. 

Take plenty of sleep, and KEEP 
A W Nnow'oPKX. Fresh air at 
••ij;' h t ip as necessary as food in the 
d«y t:me. 

There' snothing difficult in any of 
these, but they will make a different 
person of you ,if you give them a 
chance. 

Do something for yourself, and 
don't expect the Lord to do it all. 

\ ou don't want to leafe us, and 
we don't want to be shedding tears 
over your remains in 1H24. 

While Omer Porter, Mrs. Carrie . . 
Riddell, Mrs. Pace ami daughte*'. 
were driving atone, the road belo > 
Petersburg in Mrs. Riddel's auto, 
last Friday, a team ofn mules travel 
ing in the sume direction behind th.- 



1 Boone countyite down. His many 
'j friends back in his Old Kentucky 
' Home are glad to iier.r of hi '- good 
■ luck. 



Tin 
.he II-..r, 
with vht 



until Jiiiuuiy I-n. in'out Vmfy 
hundred automobile owners in Booms 
county had secured their license for- 
U»24. It is estimated that there 
are about 15"0 autos and trucks to>- 
gether in the county. 



pool toon 
distr 



growi 

:ct are Rij 
i» 



Cl , .-:c I 



advances Doing matte oy *." 

| t\)-upe.uli\e As.-j.-iaUoi!. a? ih-.-y B££ 
higher than last year. The advar.C< 
' the Association is making is very 
near the independent floor average, 
i and will receive two more paymen's 
I when the tobacco is sold, The Assoc - 
j iation has about .'JO, 000,000 pound 
I of last year's crop unsold, and it is 
i all of the best grades. Poolers all 
i over the district are passing resolu- 
tions asking the Association's offi- 
! cials not to be in a hurry to sell the 
| remainder of the 1 922 tobacco and 
j to hold a still! price on the weed. 



H. W. Kyle, of Erlanger, a as trails 
acting business in Burlir.gton, last. 
Friday. Harry is one o. . :i Boorw 
county colony th-i has helped to in- 
crease the population oi cnat thriv- 
ing city. 



Would you believe that the peo- 
ple of Boone county spent last year 
car, not scared and run off. Mr. Por- j for automobiles, accessories and gas 
ter, who was driving the auto saw | oline not less than $1,500 per day- 



ty of good fresh air into their sleep- 
ing rooms, are in moch less danger 
of, getting colds. The homan body 
was' not meant to be hived up in 
closely shut buildings, and people 
who follow this unnatural course take 
chances. 



Speak gently, smile sweetly, give 
liberally. That 

wo.ild do were he 



Some one asks how the custom of 
having a holiday on New Year's or- 
iginated? PoMibly because the 
folks who saw the old year out were 

thn 



is what t hrint too -ieepy to accomplish much 
on cHrth today. next day. 



B. C. Tanner and S. H. Aylor, two 
of the Recorder's good friends of 
Florence, were transacting business 
in the county Neat, last Thursday 
Thev called at the Recorder office 
and paid their initiation fee for 
another year. 



the mutes coming, and tried to gel 
out of the way, but before he suc- 
ceeded the tongue of the wagon had 
been Jammed against the back enu 
of the cur. Fortunately, the only 
damage done was the breuking of tin- 
glass und battering the end of tin- 
car considerably. 

Merchants having surplus holiday 
and winter stock would better pay a 
little for adjKarttftng- I* LP the KK 
COKDER, rather than take chances 
cm carrying it OVtl to another year. 



about $500,000 a year? Add to this 
the tremendous sum thut leaves the 
county for necessaries of life and it 
will be seen that there is a steady 
drain on our resources. This vus: 
sum of money is being centralized rn 
large manufacturing cities. This is 
one reason that our young people 
are going to the cities. They ate fid 
lowing our money 



There is only one prisoner in tho 
county jail — he is serving time fur.- 
violating the prohibition taw. Jat'itar 
Fowler will be giad A hen I. is time r*s 
out, as he has had i{. iLe a number of 
boarders for several Month*. 

At a masting of the Ka,.>-^'.c ■ -un- 
iv Liuon, one d^y last week, at l.ex- 
ington, the mem 1 ' . k ■ .> <■.. I i to 1 
against the State bond is..^ at $;~>u.r- 
(100,000. 

Congressman Ro.:.se lias introJu«- 
' ed a bill in Congrats asking for -ui 
; appropriation of "575,000 for thj£« 

erection of a po-Mlfi e b uildlTTg at 
I Falmouth. 



Mrs. Emily KerkaJire, nfcir 
lu-en o^uite sick for several w«*eks>', 
Importing slowly. 



The l!»2:< Chri*tma.s mail was ih<- 
largest t ei passed thro-.ign the Urn 

luigtoll postofl 



K.dgar Berkshire anil a i 

the Christmas holidays » Ui 
in Cincinnati 






Good l>ve I 1 ' ' t »ro»Uy 



anaaai 



• 



"!F 



T" 



*AGE 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



IDLEWILD. 

New Year's Greetings to the Rf- 
corder and my fellow correspondents. 
Sufficient unto the day is the wct- 
vH thereof. 

Miss Gene Miller of Florence, was 
the mid-week £ue>t of Miss Frances 
Berkshire. 

The young society set was delight- 
fully entertained Monday ■> venin^ 
by Miss Evelyn McCord. 

A terrjjjc rain accompanied by an 
electrical storm, fell here Sunday 
night. 

Master Edward F. Helms, of Pet- 
ersburg, spent Sunday with his 
Jriend, Mrs. Ben S. Houston. | 

he children in this district attend- 
ing school in Petersburg, resumed 
their school Monday morning. Thev 
had «nly one week's vacation. ' 

Miss Nell Stephens was one of the 
jpjests at the dinner given Sunday by 
Mrs. Grant Mathews, of Petersburg, 
in honor of her daughter, Miss Laura 
May Mathews, who is home froTi 
Richmond for the Christmas vaca- 
tion. 

Mrs. W. M. Rachal, Si\, Miss Nor- 
ma Rachal, of Union, John M. Rach:»I 
of Lexington, and Mrs. William L. 
Spears, of Beaver spent Saturday 
with their kinswoman, Mrs. James S. 
Asbury. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Berkshire, >f 
Petersburg, Mr. and Mrs. Max I\ 
Sridley of St. Louis, Miss Elizabeth 
Eberhart, of Lawrenceburg, and Mr, 
Frank B. Berkshire of Indianapolis, 
were dinner guests of Mrs. James S. 
Asbury, Thursdav night. 



A 

day 



PETERSBURG. 

Ralph White has mumps. 

A large number are on the sick 
list. 

Mrs. \yilson White is ill with the 
mumps. 

Forest Krutz was very ill for a fe'v 
days last week. 

Wood Sullivan, Sr., has been ill 
for several days. 

Mrs. Fannie Snyder has been very 
ill for several days. 

Dr. J. M. Grant is surely a biny 
man visiting the sick. 

W. A. Gaines spent last week with 
Mr. and Mrs. lien Oisler. 

Lloyd McGlasson and family spent 
Sunday at the Crsler home. 

Our friend, Carl Botts, spent a few- 
days in our town last week. 

Boone Ryle has been confined to 
his home some time with mumps. 

he day Mrs. mary Ktopp was 72 
years old she was taken sick with 
mumps. 

Lloyd Norris and family spent last 
Wednesday here at the home of Ben 
Berkshire. 

Kirtley Klopp, of Brookville, spent 
Christmas week here with relatives 
and friends. 

Miss Helen Marie Burns of Hs- 
bron, is staying with her aunt, Mrs. 
Katie McWethy. 

Or. Marshall Terrell and family, 
of Lawrenceburg, sspent last Sundav 
with F. M. Wingate. 

Mrs. J. M. Grant spent last Friday 
in Aurora at *he home of her sister, 
Mrs. James Thompson. 

Rev, Carter and wife were he~e 



FOR SALE ETC 






Do you need new tubs, wash 
boards, boilers, clothes lines or 
clothes pins? I have them. Hope 
Conner, Florence, Ky. 

TuRKEYS FOR^SALE 

Toms $8 and J 12; Pullets $6 and 
$8; Guineas, 75c. Mrs. B. E. Aylor 
Burlington, Ky. 



To cross water use a boat. To haul 
on mud, use a sled. GOOD SLEDS 
are made by CONNER A KRAUS 
Florence Kv. BUY NOW! 



Coughs that 
hang on— 

Break thetn now before they 
lead to more serious trouble. 
Dr. Kings New Discovery 
•tops coughing quickly by 
stimulating the m neons 
membranes to throw off 
clogging se- 
cret ioiu. It 
has n pleas- 
ant taste. All 
druggists. 



WANTED 

Tenant for 1924. James Bullock 
Burlington, Ky., R. D. 3. 
olOjan — 2t 




*a,*HVJ »J NEW DISCOVERY 



f\j» *f ■*_»<"* »c? 




For Sale — Six pure bred Buff Leg- 
horn cockerels. James Bullock Bur- 
lingt-m, Ky., R. D. 3. 

* olOjan— 2t 



I 
II. Norman is spending a few several days during Christmas, als*» 
in Union with his kinspeople. Robert Nixon, Jr., of Lexington. 

■*■■»» Oliver Geisler wife and sister, of 

RED GROSS NFW\ Cincinnati, spent a few days hen. 
^4^4^m^^4^VY O . i wttlrm eir yather -anJaunTTlast wee '; . 

Mrs. tirgie Sullivan, of Bullitts- 

her fathe 



LOST — Between Gunpowder and 
Big Bone, last Thursday, a tarpaulin. 
Finder please notify Herman, Cin- 
cinnati Hay & Grain C . F Covington, 
K >- 1*— pd 



Mrs. Crandall (low.) T.lla How Shu 
Stopped Chicken ' 



'Laat spring, rats killed all our Ulwchfcki. Wan 
rd kaowa about Rat-Snap before With jmt one 
Urge package we killed (warns of rats. They wont 
get this year's hatches. 1*11 bet. " Rat-Soap is (Bar. 
antetd and sells (or 35c. 65c, 91.25. • 

Sold and guaranteed by 
Gntley * Peftit. Burlington. Kv. 

*>• **• Blythe Burlington. K.v. 



A Striking Value— at *295 



For Sale— 10 shoats, weigh about 
75 pdunds each. Henry Afterkirk, 
Farmers phone Union exchange. 
It 



NOTICE 

I will not be responsible for debts 
contracted by any person. 

LLOYD TANNER 

Union, Ky. 



with 



The annual election of officers for ' ville, spent Sunday 
the chapter will be held at the Chris- ' and family, Mr. Wood Sullivan, Sr 
tian church in Florence, Tuesday, ' 



January 8th, at 1 :30 p. m. All inter- 
ested in the work being done by the 
lied Cross locally or nationally, are 
urged to attend. The Field Repres- 
entative, Mrs. Columbia White, of 
Lexington, will be present. 



The following letters was recently- 
received : 

"Your box containing the pajamas 
from your chapteT arrived yesterday. 
The chief nurse at the hospital fre- 
quently calls on us for pajamas and 
we are delighted to have the ones 
yen sent us to place at her disposal. 
Th^y are so well made and warm, 
and we assure you are most welcome. 

Please extend to your members our nere with her sis 
Tery best wishes fss-wr happy New White and family. 

and strain thanking you fori M r. and Mrs. ' Paul Shanks and 

('daughter, of Brookville, Ind., spent 
several days here with relatives and 
friends, last week 



Mrs. Will Crisler returned to her 
home after spending a week wi'.h 
her mother of this place, Mrs. W. H. 
Hensley. 

Mrs. Leoa Elitte (nee McWethy) 
and Mrs. Hazel Smith McWethy, aro 
spending the holidays here among 
relatives. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Evans spent 
last Wednesday in Lawrenceburg 
with their daughter Mrs. Len Ruth 
And family. 

Miss Laura Mae Mathews, who :s 
attending school at Richmond, Ky., 
spent her Xmas here with her moth 
er and familv. 



FARM FOR RENT 

Twelve acres for co rn, 3 -acres tut 
tobacco. House and outbuildings, also 
want dairying. For Sale— New Sup.-r 
Hatch incubator, 125 egg capacitv. 
barring Flick, Union, Ky. 
olOjan — pd 

For Sale — Bronze Turkeys. Young 
toms $10, pullets $6. Mrs. R. J. Akin 
Burlington, R. D. 1. 

It— pd 




^ For Sale— Eight ton of alfalfa hay 
Gulley & McGlasson, Constance Kv 
It— pd 



NOTICE— See M. B. Bice, Rabbit 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford cars 
and Ford Tractors. 
23aug— tf 



Considering the improved 
appearance of the new 
Ford Touring Car, one 
would naturally expect a 
proportionate advance in 
price. 



creasing its cost to the 
purchaser. 

A comparison extending 
over a long period of years 
will reveal the fact that 
the present price is actu- 
ally the lowest at which 
the five-passenger open 
car has ever been sold. 



Larger scale production, 
however, has made it pos- 
sible to incorporate in this 
new type touring car a 
number of decided im- 
provements without in- 

This Car can be obtained through the Ford Weekly Punhase Man 



The Ford Touring Car 
stands today, as it always 
has, a most remarkable 
value in the motor car field. 




FARMS 



CONSTANCE. 



Mrs. Hazel Romines and children 
of Indiana, spent last Wednesday 
here with her sister, Mrs. Ralph 



again tnanking you 
yeur co-operation and interest, I am 
Yours Very Sincerely, 
Selma Kluga, Rep. Red. Cross Ser- 
vice, U. S. Marine Hospital, No. 8, 
Evansville, Ind. 



POULTRY ASSOCIATION 

WILL MEET HERE. 



tu„ d o ™ , I r'"«* ounaay alter spend ne th 

The Boone County Poultry Asso* jdays at her home at Forence 
ion will moot o* tt. n c j. u_ I I, . "- * "rente. 



iation will meet at the Court HouTe 
Friday, Jan. 4th, at 1 p. m. 

Important business will be conisd- 
ered which will determine the pol- 
icies and the success of the organiza- 
tion for this year. Election of officers 
will also be held. 

All members are urged to attend 
and those interested in becoming 
members are invited. 



Your scribe wishes to thank her 
many friends and relatives for so 
many nice Christmas presents. May 
God bless each giver. 

Miss Gene Miller returned to this 
r^co Sunday after spending the hoi 

Sho 



teacher a room at the school here! 

Happy New Year to you Mr. Ed- 
itor. May this be a year to you 
with many "blessings. May your 
good paper prosper and bring to you 
many new subscribers. 

White Bros., had Old Santa to call 
at their store Saturday before Xmas 
arid they invited all the children to 
come to the store. Each child receiv- 
. r . „ ed an orange, which gladdened the 

t JIL i Cr0SS Was burned „ on Gal- 1 hearts of the little ones. 

J- 9; Evans, of Latbnia, who is 
feupt., and als, teaches the Bibb 
Class at the ( I rislian church there 
received a diamond pin and flowers 
irom the school, showing how thev 
appreciated -his good work for the 
year past. 



latm street opposite the Methodist 
church, about 12 o'clock Christmas 
night. Also a few sticks of dyna- 
mite were exploded to apprise the 
citizens, we presume, of the here- 
abouts of the Ku Klux. After hearing 
the explosions quite a number of 
people gathered at the scene and 
watched about fifteen of the Elans- 
men parading around the burninjr 
cross. 6 



According to telephone officials, 
9Z3 was the greatest year in the his- 
tory of the telephone industry in 
Kentucky in the matter of additional 
investment, new construction work 
and the number of new telephones 
installed. It is estimated that the 
gross additions to telephone plants 
» Kentucky during the year amount- 
en to more than $839,000. 



T. Stephenson, of 



Mr. and Mrs. J. 
■ear Limahurg , entertained witl 
a* o clock dinner, Sunday evening 
• 30th, in honor of their daugh' 



ter Mane and friend R. C. Ernst,~of 
Hebron. Honor guests were Misses 
Loretta Hogan, Hilda Houston and 
Jessie Jones, Messrs. Wilbur Hou->- 
t<m JJoseph Hogan and Julius 



HEBRON. 

Lots of sickness in this commun- 
ity. 

This is wisning the Recorder and 
its many readers a happy prosperous 
New Year. 

Hubert Conner had a milking ma- 
chine installed in his large dairy 
barn las) week. y 

Mr. and Mis. Morris Rouse and 
children spent Sunday with Mr. a d 
Mrs Elmer Kelly, of Burlington. 

Walter Riddell was very ill several 
days last w*<k. 

Saturday Jan. 5th is the regular 
annual hr°in es« and e leaiuu of o f 



Mrs. Fred Bishov is visiting rela- 
tes in Cincinnati. 

Julius Beil has sold his farm to 
. J^awrente Micb D ls. 

Born on Christmas day to Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles Moore, a fine baby girl 
Mrs. Moore was formerly Miss Dor- 
thy Hyden, of Constance. 

The exercises at the church Xmas 
night proved a great success. The 
children enjoyed the treat immense- 
ly. 

Floyd Bolington and Rosie Peeno 
were married in Covington, Satur- 
day, Dec. 15th. Rev. W. H. Carlisle 
of 623 Greenup Street, performe I 
the ceremony. 

The funeral of Mary Mund, daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Reeves 
was held in the church here Wednes- 
day at one o'clock. Shewed at her 
home *W*y R ad, Delhi Ts^nshi,), 
Sunday Dec. 23. She leaves to mourn 
her loss her mother, father, three 
sisters one brother, her husband, 
Fred Mund, and a four weeks old 
infant. She was a loving wife, daugh- 
ter and sister, and will be missed bv 
her family, but their loss is her gaip 
The services were conducted by R..\- 
Milller, of Bromley. A large numbe- 
attended the funeral. The family has 
the sympathy of this community in 
their bereavement. Thus our love i 
ones are crossing over one by on- 
and we all will meet afOund the 
great white throne. 



129 acres, good house, barns and 
outbuildings 1 % miles from town 
$12,500. 

114 acres on pike, good house, barns 
and outbuildings, splendid loca- 
tion $10,500. 

"2 acres on pike, well fenced and 
watered, 1 Vi miles from town, two 
story house \.nn basement, good 
barn and all outbuildings. This is 
a bargain $7500. 

52 acres close to town, splendid lo- 
cation, large barn well fenced, and 
land in good condition. $2500 cash 
balance to suit purchaser with 5'. 
per cent interest. 

A. B. RENAKER, 

Burlington, K. 
29nov tf. 



C W. MYERS MOTOR CO., 

ij£j Florence, Kjr. 



aVAJLt TKUCJU iiAtrou 




c —..v. iiciuuh OI OT- 

ficers of the Lutheran congregation 
beginning at 10 a. m 

Mrs. Iiora Gan.ett and Mrs. Eliz., 
Porter. , per! f one , Xv ) L < A week with 
Mrs Mary Baker and Mrs. Leo 
Weaver of Lower River Koad! 

Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Jones, who 
Ja.e resided on O. C. Hafer's farm 

The citizens of Burlington and | He ^e^ln ^arm^ 9 ^S' 
r^S^^-titedt!^,-, STbove f Sn^o°n n "* 



.. ., r.—° — "•""' *" e inviiea t< 
«»e Burlington Baptist church Wed- 
nesday evening, January 2nd, at 7 30 
ZUlZl *' a * which time Mr. Harley 
*mitn, Reader and Impersonator, of 
ijexington, accompanied by the girls 
choir of Petersburg Christian chur h 
will render an interesting program. 

White m the city, last week, we 
Mac I occasion to go from Covington 
to Newport, and from the large body 
•f water in the Licking we were lead 
to believe that Bro. Shonert's dam 
■ear Falmouth had broken loose. 

L. L. Stephens, wife and son, Oak- 
ley, spent Sunday with Lon Clore ' 
and mother, out on the Burlington 
and Waterloo pike. 



Brace Campbell, of Idlewild, was 
• business visitor to the Hub Tues- 
day afternoon. 



Mr and Mrs. Mose Aylor 
tamed I several relatives last Sunday 

were Mr. and Mrs. Lester Aylor and 
son, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Baker and 
daughter Mr. and Mrs. FranT Ay- 
lor and Henry L. Aylor and son 
Mr- andd Mrs. Wilmer King and 

th R Ug H hter 0i ', D v ayt ° n ' 0hio ' -nfyud .t 
the home of her mother, Mrs. Eliza 

r° 8t0 ?'> 8t S^urday, after spend 

Z V aCa " 0n in the South 
Among other guests at Mrs. Poston's 
last Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Elza 
Porton and daughter, of Burlmgtoi, 
jnd Miss Belle Baker, of „e.S 



Monday night about 8 o'clock 
while the wind was blowing at the 
rate of forty miles an hour and the 
mercury in the thermometer was 
descending about as fast as an auto 
could speed over the Florence pik» 
and while the citizens of the town 
were sitting around their fireside 
reading the evening papers, they 
were started by an exposion that 
shook the windows in the residences 
causing them to rush to the front 
doors in time to see a large fiery 
cross burning on the hill in Hubert 
Rouses' field at the foot of Jefferson 
street While the crowd was watch- 
ing the burning cross, they were 
startled by another, explosion in the 
south end of town where another 
cross was burning. The person or 
persons who were brave enough *o 
face that cold, ehilly wind long 
enough to plant bombs and set the 
crosses is entitled to a Carnegie 
medal. At midnight four more loud 
bombs were touched off warning the 
people of the going of the Old and 
the coming of the New Year 



Why Mr. N. WincUor (R. I.) Put Ud 
with Rats for Years 

kilkd^rfi^. 1 g °. 1 ?T ra, ,P° is <«- »«*» nearly 

, °^ fine watch dog. We put up with raw 

gff**^ *? l l ™ 'bout Ra«. P S„. p P RL35 

dn, ,., '^ 0U * h h0U " P * U WOn '' t0aci > Jt " R*U 
dry up and leave do smell. Prices. J5c. 6Sc. $1 257 

-JSnM-.arf— ,-, otee dby 

(iu lleyjfe Pettit, 1). K. Blythe. 

GOING AND COMING 

The old year fades aay, and the 
godof tiuu' ushers in the infant of 
1 924. 

The years come and they go, and 
are seen no more, but they leave a 
heritage that even time itself can 
not efface. 

i 1923 we have had our ups and 

principal- 



HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 

'A Good Show' 



Admission 22 Cents, 



Children 10 Cents 



War Tax Included 



"« i ax included ., 

*ai^:a»;.y.»jre.i^^ 




TutfifiH fliajf" 



BHj Money 
for Your 




downs, but they have been 
ly ups. Business has been reason- 
ably good, employment has been 
plentiful, and contentment has been 
close to general in its scope. 

Lp past years the approach of a 
presidential election has meant un- 
certainty, uarest, and a considera- 
ble degree of commercial and finan- 
cial apprehension, if not stagnation. 
The coming election has produced 
no jolt or jar. It seems to have had 
no appreciable ecect. except to con- 
vince the public that our system of 
government is so sound it approach- 
es the unshakable — a Rock of Gib- 
raltar among the nations of the 
earth. 

Legislation is required to relieve 
certain classes of our citizens from 
apparent injustice, but that is a m a t- 
ter tha t will undoubted l y be regulat- 
ed by the new congress. 

Everything considered, the out- 
look is bright — very bright. 

Be an optimist, and its brightness 
will not be dimmed. 



Ship 



4rfLL&A H 



^TrFPT "- ng ^^ J 113 ? ° f , thC blg m ° ne y 

brtUBERT is paying for furs? If you're not, 
thats your fault. WaLe up! Get "SHUBERT" 
pnees for your furs from now on--just take a look 
at the prices quoted bflow for Kentucky Furs' 
That's what "SHUBERT" will pfl /on an 
honest and liberal grading. Our shippers right in 
your own neighborhood are reaping a golden 
harvest. Get in on this big money f 

COME ON. WITH YOUR FURS 



IW EXTRA IAK£ 

ItmtATO AVIUM 



N91 LARU 

fXTCU TO A»J(r» 



I MEMUM 

'HtmuM 



m SMALL 

CITtA to MraMtt 



The old custom that had been in 
vogue for many years, in Burling- 
ton, warning the people of the go- 
ing of the old and the arrival of the 
New Year, by the ringing of the bells, 
has been abandoned. In these good 
old days everybody joined in in the 
sport, but ln this day and age every- 

SSlt' eH r, d r Pend8 ° n " Geor * e d '- 
strilce gC haS g ° ne on a 



John Kahr, Alfred Dolwick 
»on, Master Edwin, of Constance 
and Mr. J ohn True*, f Colt,' 
*"«*'*•", were transacting business 
Jin Burlington, Uat Thursday. 



TRUCKING 

OF ALL KINDS DONE BY 

Walter R. Huey 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Pric. R...« MfcU . Gl*. M . . Tri.1 

PWm 416-X 



REQUIREMENTS FOR 
A RURAL TEACHER 

The question is sometimes asked 
what is the most important point to 
be considered in selecting a teacher 
for a rural school. Some people 
would say that education was the 
most vital thing, that a teacher must 
have had a good school course, and 
if possible normal training. 

Yet country schools are often un- 
able to insist upon the qualifications 
that would be required ia a city 
school. But there are several qual- 
ifications that a teacher surely needs 
in a rural school. She should like 
country ife, and believe tha t the 
country is a good place for young 
people to grow up in; she should be 
ambitious for her children, able to 
make them want to learn and be- 
come efficient in everything, and she 
should have a high standard of char- 
acter, which should inspire her pu- 
pils with a contempt for mean and 
low action. 



OPOESP M 

«J45 



M»2 



1.65 to 1.30 



1.25 to .90 



30 to 5H 45 to .30 .45 to M 



Fine, Dark. 
■U»al Celor. 



mink: 



10.00 to 9.008.50 to 7.50 f 6.75 to 5.504Jc lo 4.00J4.75 to 2.5d] 
800 to 725 6.50 to 5.75 525 to 425 3.75 to 3 00 3.75 to 2.00| 



MUSKRAT 






2.40 to 2.00 1.75 to 1,35 125 to JO .85 to .50 



.85 to .35 



£!^ e _5-i. eme,y hl ^ h P ricea •** *>*»** on the well-known 
'SHUBERT" STANDARD GRADING and are qSS 
for immediate •hipment. No. 3'«, No. 4'i and otherwise 
infenoT skins at highett market value. 

Don't delay another minute! Quick action 
means more money for you. 



Hurry In A Shipment 



to> 



A fellow doesn't have to go to war 
to smell pQwdar that* days. 



ABSHUBERTinc 

l?-27WAu0iiii Ave CHICAGO 



DO YOU TAKE THK RECORDER? 

3ut»cr.bc For The heeorder . , $i. 60 per year 



PACE 



BOONE COUUTT R1C 0,B DER 



* 



All obitaaries, card of thank* tad 
all •tkar matter, not news, mutt be 
paid for at 6 eanU par liaa. 

Sullittsburg Baptist Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Pastor. 
Sunday School •Tory Sunday at 

10.00 a. m. 

Ragxrtmr preaching aor wfe ee aa iha 
Fbat and Third ttnndaya to 
aaeath at 11:00 a. m. 



Methodist Episcopal Church. 

REV. P. G. GILLESPIE Pastor 

Florence and Burlington Chart* 

FLORENCE 

First and Tiiird Sundays 11 a. n». 

Sunday School 9:30 s. m. 
(Miss Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 

Epworth League every Sunday at 
6 p. to. 
(Miss Mamie Robinson, President) 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30. 
BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 

Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 
in. 



Petersburg Baptist Church. 

REV. O. J. CHASTAIN, Pastor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 
a. m. 

Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sun. lay 11a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 



EDWARDS-AMES MARRIAGE. 

One of the prettiest weddings of 
the autumn season and one of the 
much interest in Virginia and the 
middle west, took place at the Pun- 
goteague M. E. church, South, Wed- 
nesday, November 28th, at 2 o'clock 
in the afternoon, hen Miss Lucy 
Mears Ames, df^hter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Samuel W. Ames, became the 
bride of Captain Ray Omer Edwards 
United States Army, retired. 

"The altar of the church was decor- 
ated with native pine and cathedral 
candles, and the aisles were marked 
by tall standards with bouquets of 
yellow chrysanthemums and tulle. 
The ceremony was performed by Rev. 
J. E. Wh::„ 

The bride was given in marriage 
by her brother, Mr. Milton B. Ames, 



of Norfolk. She wore white silk chif- 1 

fon velvet and a veil of illusion and ! were of inestimable value 



THINK, CONGRESS, THINK! 

The secretary of war is asking 
congress to enact a law whereby 
General Pershing may be retained 
on the active list of the army after 
he reaches the retirement age in 
September, 1924. To do this a spec- 
ial bill would have to be passed in 
the isolated case of General Persh- 
ing or that clause of *_l.z existing 
law requiring retirement at the age 
of 64 would have to be amended or 
nullified, thus retaining officers inde- 
finitely who have political influence 
sufficient to prevent retirement. 

The secretary asks this preference 
for General Pershing on the basis of 
his services in the world war, and it 
is far from our desire to cast any 
reflections • :~ i those crr-icz: 

But it occhrs to us that there are 
other generals who served in the 
war with distinction, whose services 

to our 



Duchess lace caught with orange country, who are physically fit and 
blossoms, and carried a bouquet of mentally alert, and et ho have since 
lily of the valley showered with white tne war Deen retired from the ser- 
violeta. She was attended by Mrs. vice because they have reached the 
Harvey S. Givler, of Norfolk, as ma- a * e of 64 - 

tron of honor, Miss Nannie Ames, is I If it is right to retain General 
maid of honor, and Mrs. George A. j P«"hing in the service after he 
Woody, of Frankford Arsenal, Pa., reaches the age of retirement, for 



Miss Thelma Brown, of Williams- 



the good of our country as the set-- 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 






r- -| 

The wet weather the past month i 
has been very hard on the roads. 

The season for killing rabbits and I 
quail expired Monday night. 

■■ ■' 
The weather man says you can ex- ' 

pert some real winter weather for 

the next few days. 



2^*V**%^.*^**^^^W 



Frank Wingate, who has beer 
working in Cincinnati for the past 
two months, is at home. 



Monday being the last day of th- 
year, there was quite a rush at the 
County Cl»rV'» ofn<"» 'or auto licen- 
ses. ; 



You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered by 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

ot 

Erlanger, Ky. 



Stanley Bonta, of Cincinnati, '•% 
the guest of his parents, Mr. anl 
Mrs. J. O. Bonta, out on the Peters- 
burg pike. 

County Attorney B. H. Riley 
spent two or three days in Louisville, 
last week, attending the Association 
of Circuit Judges and Commonwealth 
Attorneys.' 



———ass— s— ^»ass»s— — ■ ■ i ■ ■ i - — ■ ■ '— ^ — i^— »^^— — ■■ — ■ ^^— sa 

gggCOURTESYCaC 8 ™^£ E 3g-gSTABlLITYfrgK 



Boons Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. GEO. A. ROYER. Pastor. 
Sunday Jan. 6th, 1924. 

Hopeful 0:30 a. m., Sunday School. 

Hopeful 7 p. m., Luther League. 

Hopeful 10 a. m., Monday Jan. 7th, 
annual meeting. 

Hebron 10 a. m., Saturday Jan. 5th, 
annual meeting. 

Hebron 9:30 a. m., Sunday Jan. 6t'i, 

Sunday School. 

Hebron 2:30 p. in., meeting of the 
Brotherhood. 

Ebenezer 10:30 a. in., Regular Ser- 
vice. 
Members are urged to attend tl." 

Annual Meeting opening promptly at. 

10 a. m. AH are cordially wclconu. 

1!>24, right on the dot! 

The days are getting longer. 

Don't forget to write it 1924. 

Next Monday is county court. 

A good January motto: "Step up 
and pay up." 

Begin now to save for next Xmas. 
It is only a year away. 

Mrs. Lucy Cloud has beerr quite 
poorly for several days with grippe. 

Mrs. Richard Penn spent the holi- 
days with her parents at Cynthiana. 

While setting a standard for oth- 
ers, while not live up to it yourself? 

Before spring the road between 
Burlington and Florence will almost 
be impassable. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Hall spent 
several days the past week with then- 
children in Newport. 

Dr. R. E. Cropper and wife, of 
Winchester, spent the holidays with 
his mother, Mrs. Lorena Cropper. 

The price of a subscription looks 
just as good to us in 1924 as it did 
in 1923. Or did wo get vours in 
1923? 

R. Lee Hucy, of Big Bone, was 
the guest of his sister, Mrs. J. E. 
Gaines and family, the latter part of 
laH week. 

Clifford Sutton, of Cincinnati, 
spent the latter part of last week 
with his mother, Mrs. Jane Sutton, 
at Bcllcvicw. — 



burg, Va.; and Misses Susie and Cora re tary says, then it is equally vital 
Byrd Ames, as bridesmaids. that these other valorous and dis- 

The matron of honor Wore orange \ tinguished officers who have been re- 
crepe Roma embroidered with crstal ; tir ed be restored to the active list of 
beads, and carried an arm bouquet I the armv and retained in the ser- 
or orange calendula and lavender ' v >ee— for the good of our country 
sweet peas. The maid of honor wore [ Manv ma J or generals who corn- 
bronze and gold brocaded met U I nianded fi g htin B divisions in the 
cloth and earned an arm bouquet t * reat war have sinc *' reached the 
of orange calendula. The brides- i *&' hmit and been promptly retired, 
maids wore amber velvet and pokes, as the Iaw requires. No estimate can 
of brown tulle and crepe and carried be P lacc>d u P»n the tremendous value 
arm bouquets of yellow chrysanthe- ! of thc experience and lessons learn- 
mums. | ed bv them at the cannon's mouth. 

Little Miss Anne Mears Givler, of Thev are too immeasurably great to 
Norfolk, niece of the bride, was be shirked, too precious to be cast 
flower girl. She wore a dainty dress j aside ' to ° Vlt ally necessary to our 
of gold organdie and carried' a bas- ! fut ure security to be sept into tho 
ket of Christmas gold chrysanthe- ! dlscard - 



It is reported that moonshine is b )- 
ing manufactured not many milts 
from the temple of justice — those 
who have good smellers say they can 
smell corn cooking. 



024- 



Denzil Carpenter, who is teaching 
in the High School, at Parsons, West. 
Virginia, spent the holidays with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Carpen- 
ter, in Locust Grove neighborhood. 



mums. Master Samuel Ames, of Nor- ! If we need the continued services 
folk, a nephew of the bride,. dressed * of General Pershing we are equally 
in a suit of white velvet, was ring ln necd of the services of these oth- 



Mr?. Eugenia Blythe, who has been 
quite sick for the past three weeks, 
is not improving very fast. Mrs. 
Eliza Arrasmith, of the Waterloo 
neighborhood, is nursing her. 



. 



bearer. 



er distinguished and efficient leaders, 



The bridegroom's best man was wno Performed so nobly in wresting , 



W. A. Waters, of Erlanger rural 
route four, was transacting business 
in Burlington, Monday. He called at 
this .,.f.ce and renewed the subscrip- 
tion of our old friend W. E. Popham. 



8 
8 



Captain George A. Woody, United 
States Ain.y, of Frankford Arsenal, 
Pa., and the groom .men were Mr. L. 
Floyd Nock, Jr., of Accomas; Mr. 
Harvey., 1 * fl*yl»t "f Vorfolk. Mr. 
Austin J. Byrd, of KeTUr, and Mr. 
John Drummond, of Nandua. 

Mr. James A. Hopkins played 
Schumann's "Taumerie," and Ver- 
die's "11 Trovatore" before the cere- 
mony and during the ceremony ren- 
dered softly MacDowell's "To a Wild 
Rose." As a processional, he played 



victory from certain defeat. 

It i.; a cardinal principle of the ' 
army to be fair and just in all things 
and General Pershing, as its head, 
would wc think, be tho.»J°st to ask 
ohfcrinunatft. .. ..-^i^iation in his own 
behalf. 

Congress should be just to these 
other gallant officers or leave the 
law as it stands. 



Organization in Louisville of 119 

Home Coming county societies is 

the wedding march from' Lohengrin, i wel1 under way and John R. Down 



The year 1923 passed out very 
wet — in fact the last two weeks of 
the year was very warm and rainy, 
and there are people who will say 
they never saw such weather before 
for the time of year. 

DON'T MISS IT. 

You will miss a big treat if you 
fail to go to the Burlington Baptist I 
church Wednesday evening, January j 
2nd. Don't ask what it is, go and i 
see. You won't be sorry you went, j 



We expect to make cur services big- 
ger and better during the New Year. 
Come in and let us help you with 
your business matters. 

Four per cent and taxes paid on de- 
posits. 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00. 

Peoples Deposit Bank jg 

Burlington, Ky. 



and as a rocessional Mendelssohn': 
wedding maich. 

The bride is a graduate of Ran- 
dolph Macon Woman's College, of 
the class of 1917, of which she was 
Senior President, and she has a'so 
dnre graduate work at Harvard Un- 
r.ersity and the University of Cali ! , According to the association '.* 
fonria. She is a member ** the I P ans the . ,,Q -societies to be formed 



ng, chairman of state organization, 
expects the task to be completed by 
Christmas, according to an an- 
nouncement just made by Huston 
Quin, mayor of Louisville and gen- 
eral chairman of the Kentucky Home 
C o ming A ss oc ia ti o n . 



Waltci T^vi.ns, 81 Jvdge of the' 
L'. S. Court cf the Western District I 
jf Kentucky, died at his home ir I 
Louisville, Morday niv. . ng, Dec. 31. 
He was appointed judex of the Unit- 
ed States court in 189'.». 



in Louisville will be composed of na- 
groom is a "iduate of 'h ■ Civil In- '■ tives and former residents— or d* 



Kappa Alph:i Theta fra'e- ity. Tne 

b • Civil En- 1 
gineering Department of Purdue Un- 
iversity, LaFayette, Ind., where he 
was a member af the Beto Theta Pi 
fraternity and Tau Beta Pi. honor- 
ary scholastic fraternity. In the 1 
World War I e served with the 12th ,' 
Field A.tillcry For bravery in ac- 
tion he received the croix de guerre 
from the French government and a 
distinguished service certificate, and 
one other American citation from 



scendants of former residents — of 
all counties in Kentucky other than 
Jefferson. It is estimated that more 
than one half of the population of 
Louisville is eligible to membershio 
in these societies, having come to 
Louisville or being descendants of 
people whose homes formerly were 
in one or more of the Kentucky coun- 
ties. 

There will be for instance thc 



one omer American citation tnmi „ ^„ " . " ; , 

the United States government. They Boonr County Society of Louisville, 



will be at home at Benton Harbor 
| Michigan, after December Ifith. 
Mr. Edwards is a brother of Mrs. 
Garnett Tolin, of this place. - 



FORGETTING OLD 
YEAR GRUDGES. 

One beautiful custom is said 



composed of natives of Boone coun- 
ty, former residents of Boone coun- 
ty or people who trace back to 
Boone county through one or more 
ancestors. The Boone County So- 
ciety of Louisville will then get in 
touch with people, in Boone county 
and request them to form a local or- 
to ganization which will be asked to co- 

head- 



Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Renaker ami 
daughter, Mary Louise, spent Xmas 
with Mr. Renaker's mother, at Dry 
Ridge, Grant county. 



j pevail in certain parts of Europe at operate with Home Coming 
! New Year's. Whatever quarrels or quarters at Louisville. 

differences may have come between "The celebration," said General 

friends, and relatives, it has become | Chairman Quin," is designed as an 
j a custom tp Jivcriooksuch ill feeling, ■■ ail-Kentucky affair and its success 
! exenange visits, drop the past and I depends upon the co-operation of all 

make a new start. | p0 od Kentuckians. Being the largest 

Many troubles come because peo- , city in the state it was Louisville's 

pie entertain petty feelings. They ( duty to start the ball rolling and this 
1 make m uch__of_ fancied s lights that , we «r>. Hnin g with nn «.lfi B h mftii».> 



TKp <»l»>/»trical men wr*> »" Bju- ! 
lington one day last week, making ' 
estimates on wiring some of the fai-1 
idences for the electric lights. A 
survey is being made for the poles 
btween Florence and Burlington. 

Mrs. Km":" Brown, of Covington,; 
spent SatUfday and Sunday with he-' 
mother, Mrs Susan Brady, at Belle- ' 
view, and Monday and New Year's 
day with her daughter, Mrs. Carroll 
Crcpj."-, ci Bullittsville neighbor- 
hood, j 

The number on the auto license 
for Boone county this year begin 
with 17,000 and run up to 20,000 — 
although there will not be over 1500 
issued. This is the first time the 
figures on the tags run over four 
figures. . I 

In sending us $1.50 to renew his 
subscription, Mr. G. W. Brunner, of 
Erlanger R. D. 4, says: "Inclosed 
find $1.50 to rtnew my subscription 
to the old Boone County Record r — 
it is always a welcome visitor to our 
home. A happy New Year." 

During the closing days of the year 
1923, quite a number of our loy:.l 
friends called in and renewed their 
subscrintion for the vear 1924. for 



PUBLIC SALE. 

Having sold my farm, I will offer for sale at my residence, 3}4 
miles south of Union, Kv., on the Hathawaj Pike, on 

Saturday, Jan. 1 2, '24 

The Following Property : - 

Three good milch Cows- one fresh Jan. 14, one March 17 and one 
in April ; 9-yr. old Mare— good worker, and safe for lady to drive; 
2-horse Road Wagon, Mowing Machine, Hayrake, Oliver Chilled 
Plow No 20, Dixie Plow. '"A" Harrow, set Work Harness. 2 Brid- 
les, Collars, Man's Saddle, Rubber Tire Buggy and Harness, 
Economy Cream Separator, Hayforks, Barrel Salt. Meat Biccks. 
interest in Scalding Box, some Bees, seme Household and Kitchen 
Furniture. 



TERMS OF SALE 

All sums of Sit). 00 and under, cash; on suni> over $10 00 a credit 
of 9 months without interest will be given, purchaser to give note 
with approved security, payable at Union Deposit Batik, Union, 
Kv , before removing propertv. 

P. P. NEAL. 



Sole to begin at 12 o'clock. 



LUTE BRADFORD, Auct. 



THE IDEALS OF THE CROWD 



I Cows kept in box stalls produce 
more milk and slightly more butter 



People woh are trying to influence . t t . „ n.„„„ i_-_ * • „ t v - 

£. ,,. . 1 ^ ■ a , fat, than thn.gp kopt in utanrhmiK a. 



uman lite toward higher ideals 
sometimes (jet discouraged by the 
things the crowd seems mostly in- 
terested in. Ministers and teachers 
seeing the tens of thousands of peo- 
ple at the football games, may wish 
thai more of the enthusiasm felt for 
sports could be put into serious ef- 
forts for self improvement and hu- 
man betterment. 

Yet the American people admire 
athletic success, because it is a form 
of skill. A people that can bring 
the playing games to such a higa 
point of perfection, are. likely al- 
ways to be successful in the more 
serious efforts. So it has proved 
true that the American people tho 
they give more time to athletic 
sports than any other nation, havo 
yet also achieved more for human 
progress than others. The two things 
seem to go together. 

Many people devote too much at- 
tention to games and too little to 
serious effort. Yet a country where 
there is not energy enough to make 
a succesdof athletic sports, is likely 
to full down in more atriotta aMptvts 
of its life. 

There are to lie no pardonn »f men 
guilty of violating thv prohibin... 
laws, Ob*. Fields told the Arumcm 
lion nf •'ircutl Judtces in im*bmoii at 
I oui*vtii«, la i \\t-< r| The Qovarnor 
I>U>iIk«'I tht> ClrcoH .lodgf* that he 
WOUld raapwt the judfinmt of lh« 

fa. »mt wui. i eeoBtrott with 

ii m tlm ment of th-» law 



Don't forget J. K. Sebree's sale 
of personal property at his residence 
on the Union and Hathaway pike, 
today (Thursday) Jan. 3rd. 

Lots of tobacco going to the Bur- 
ley warehouse at Walton. AH seem 
to be well pleased with the grading 
and advances being made. 

Miss Isabelle Duncan, of Walton, 
spent part of the holidays with her 
-friends here. She ia teaching In the 
High School at Rose Hill, Va. 

J. A. Hempfling and son, Sherley, 
of Constance, were visitors to Bur- 
lington, last Thursday. They made 
the Recorder office a pleasant call. 

Miss Mary Bess Cropper, wh m 
teaching in the Rose Hill, Va., High 
School, spent the holidays with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Cropper. ■ 

(.'laud Arrasmith and Owen Port- 
wood, from out on rural route two, 
were transacting business in Burling- 
ton. Friday. They made this office ,i 
pleasant call. I 

Notwithstanding the fact that pro- ; 
hibiiion has baen in effect for sov- ; 
crul years, Christmas of 1U2H will go 
down in hixtory as one of the wet- ! 
tc*t in history rain, rain. 

• hiistinas exercises wore held at 
ihr lUptlut church Saturday evening, 
It. An Intaraatina program had 
been, ftfepared, and Old Santa came 
mimiii ihe eeene In lima to duinl.oi^ 
tin lutMnli to the children * 



may be wholly imaginary. They inv 
pute wrong motives, and many quar- 
rels thereby come to embitter fam- 
ily relations and break up old 
friendships. 

In nine cases out of ten there is 
no gooo reason for such estrange- 
ments. People should be big enough 
to forget them, and give their old 
friendships a chance to re-establish 
themselvos. Don't blame other peo- 
ple too sharply for unpleasant things 
they have done. You may have erre.i 
yourself. Let the bright New Year 
sentiment sweep these petty thoughts 
out of people's hearts. 

NOTICE 

The regular annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Citizens Deposit 
Bank, of Grant, Ky., for the election 
of directors for the ensuing year, 
or any other business that may come 
before the meeting, will be held at 
thc office of the bank the 2nd Tues- 
day, Jan. 8th, 1924, from 12 to 3 
o'clock. 

H. A. ROGERS, Ca*hi«r. 

Membership In the Hurley Tohac 
co Growers Co-operative Asaorin 
tion, not counting the contracts of 
persons not growing Inbaeco, who 
have aigrcd contracts <-»ut vf friend 
ship for the Association and nut 
counting employees of the Associa- 
tion, almost all of whom have iikh 
ed contracts, total \>n,257. aeeordinf 
to a statement given out by William 
< itllinn, of the leld aeivue divim 



whatever in mind." 

EDUCATED CRIMINALS 

There are 7,000 college educated 
men in this country's jails, according 
to statistics collected by John Hop- 
kins university. Forgery, confidence 
schemes, frauds and swindles of 
various kinds, were the offenses most 
commonly charged against these ed- 
ucated criminals. 

This is a rather small proportion 
of the college graduates of the 
country. Still these figures demon- 
strate that book knowledge and men- 
tal training are not enough. Schools 
and colleges must give training in 
character as well as theoretical 
knowledge. A course ei study that 
does not make young folks want to 
live clean and straight has failed to 
meet their deepest needs. 

W. D. Suttton, who has been *h<f 
Farm Agent for Boone county for 
the past five years, with his wife and 
daughter, Marjorie, left on Thurs- 
day of last week for their new home 
st M^disonville. Hopkins county. The 
citliens of Rurlington and Boone 
county are Horry to lose Mr. Sutton 
and family, but what is Koone roun 
ty's loss ia Hopkina county's gain. 



subscription for the year 1924, for 
which all have our thanks and we 
I wish them health, happiness and 
prosperity during the New Year. 

Rev. G. N. Smith, who has been 

j visiting relatives and friends in the 

county, for several weeks, left last 

Friday morning for Praise, Ky., 

where he will take charge of 'a 

church. He called at this office and 

j had the Recorder sent to him at that 

; place. 

Kentucky now has a State director 
| of music. The creation of this of- 
' nee by the State Superintendent of 
I Public Instruction is the result of the 
1 action of the 1922 legislature, which 
' passed a bill giving music a place in 
| the course of study for all Kentucky 
schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Furnish and 
•on, Harvey Winn, of Golden Pond, 
Trigg county, spent the Christmas 
holidays with their daughter, Mids 
Dorothy NVll, who is spending the 
winter with her grandmother, Mrs. 
Laura Martin, and attending school 
at the Boone County HiRh school. 



. i 



Kiom Ctrmany MUM 100,061 
dlers last week. Th.j wart 16] 
on is for the. Christmas trs.t. 

Dr K W Ryla and wift unlet 
tamed relatives at dim. j«v 



Sheriff Hume has given owners of 

j h .; oirot lies and dogfc, Untfj 'anuary 

] I'.Uh to K«'t their 'licenses. All who 

ite t ttitght without name after that 

will I.- dealt with according to 

I law i • i • get your i cense ant' 

a . ii r MM) ii*. the law i < 

qeirfx the i " and 

1 tou mi t lean loin 



cording to the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, but the slight 
increase in product does not balance 
the added expense for space, bed- 
[ ding, and labor. Box stalls are to 
be recommended only when r.iaxi- 
: mum production is desired regard - 
, less of expense, as in testing for 
records. 

Henry Payne, one of the good 
colored cititens of the north end of 
1 the county, was a visitor to Burling 
I ton, last Friday. He called at the 
) Recorder office and had his subscrip- 
I tion moved up another fear. He is a 

j tenant on Geo. McGlasson's farm. 

■ 

Rue Wingate, Stanley and Marv'n 
Bonta and Kenneth Rue, attended a 
party in Cincinnati, Monday night at 
the home of an aunt of the Bonta 

boys. 

Tuesday being a legal holiday th.> 
local Jaanks, all officers at the Court 
House and rural mail carriers tooK 
a day off. 

i Your hat may cover a lot of biaun 
but it it is too small to top them all. 
There are ethers scattered aroun i 

(In-, town *• 

F.Ulv I'oaton and *lfe *|>enl Sat 
uruay night and Sunday with hn 
mothi'i , at Hebron 

New Yaar'a day waa mid and 
bright la* ids' year went oat liku 

• Hon 



aaaaaaiaaa. 



isssssssssl 



paess»»s»aji 



^a 



1 " 



«f*GE FOUR 



II ■ |ll«l«nw 



BOONE COUNTY 



<fcs the Editor Sees It. 



there — (ones 



siili. 



Which aii' y.ui gong to be 

—a Smith or a •/( s? 



stands 
n 1924 

* t< in; people live from tiand to 
mouth because the m outh is always 
rcachTnfj oiil for v. hat the hatnl con- 
_jiain.s. Thai is the reason they will 
never have anything tomorrow that 
».s left over from today. 

We hope >'5u arc nut in that cla3«, 
but if you a it the beginning of Hit 
dew year is an opportune time to <io 
some serious thinking. 

People who do not cultivate the 
habit of saving have no legitimate 
reason to complain because they 
have nothing. Yet much of the com- 
plaining is done by those who make 
no effort whatever to save. They are 
never quite satisfied until the dol- 
lars in their hands are transferred to 
*ome other person's pocket. 

As an example, take the case of 
Mr. Jones, a purely mythical person 
whom we advance for purposes of 
illustration. 

Jones has a family. He is brainy 
.-jrid draws a salary of, sa, $300 per 
mnnth. But one essential to success 
is missing— he is minus the balance 
.vhei'l which should induce him to 
lave so mething «-a> h week from hi* 
■ami ngs. 

lie couldn't u 11 ou how his flioney 
goes. It simply disappears. He 
Bevel 1 know.-, what his household ex 
pen.u's are, he has no idea how nuu'i 
he spends on clothing for himself 
and family, his b enof ac t ions are lib- 
rral but he is at sea as tothe amount 
■and all of his other expenditures are 
conducted in the same manner — to- 
tally without system. The money 
Mines in regularly each month and 
goes out as it comes. 

Now consider the ease of Mr. 
>mith, another mythical gentleman. 
He is on a par with Jones in ev- 
ery way, except that he has a bal- 
ance wheel, and it functions per- 
fectly. ♦ 

'He knows exactly how much he 
will receive each month, therefore 
r<» knows exactly how much he can 
afford to spend. 

Being a married man also, his first 
f thought is for clothing and the 
•v nthly household expenses. He care 
uliy esttk.-^it.'-. the .<.;t »f each for 
'.hi year. In like manner he care- 
fully estimates the cost of all oth- 
' expenditures for the year, Itemfe-J 
kag them a- he goes alon^. Then he J 
<trikes a total 

If he finds that his expenditures,! 
as estimated, will consume all of his! 
-alary, he revises his list, reducing | 
,:h* estimate where it can he best 
reduced. When he pairs them down 
- B> 75 per cent of his earnings he 
feels safe — and the family lives with- 
i y.tar estimate. Twenty-five per 
(tit goes into the bank each month. 
-.Smith, you will observe, prepares 
an annual budget of expenditures at 
che beginning of each year. He never 
'■umaheE his savings, and he always 
has money. He is getting there. 

Jones doesn't bother his head 
about a budget, has no check on his 
■"expenses, and has no bank account, 
i-e is standing still. ■* 

The beginning of the year is an 
ideal time to compare the records of 
Smith. and Jones. 

One of their examples vou wi'l 
f oHow. 

But which will it be? 



store in anticipation of the next 
period of business stagnation we will 
live in plenty while others do the 
yelping. 

If you like your home town, tell 
everybody about it. It must be 
worth liking or you wouldn't like it. 
And if it is worth liking it is worth 
talkng about. 

But if you don't like it let it 
itop at that. Go to work and do 
something to convert it into a town 
that you can like. 

Perhaps the one thing the town 
most needs may take root in your 
own brain. 



Why kick about the amount of 
booze that is floating around the 
country in these days of prohibition? 

What have you done to eliminate 
it? 

What have you done to aid the of- 
ficers in enforcing the law? 

Kick when you have a right to 
kick, but don't kick until you have. 

If you see a hat in the street, kick 
it. If it has a brick under it, kick 
it again. Then you will know the 
kicker injures himself most of all. 



When 
they 

Cough 

~ 7 

p ; s 

Balsam 

n « «»■■■■»« n < 

With the High 
School Classics 

Br MARGARET BOYD 




The association of railroads main- 
tain in the Capital City of the Na- 
tion what is known as the Bureau 
of Railway Economics, paying each 
their proportionate share towards its 
maintainance. 

lis activities include the gather- 
ing of a large and valuable library, 
bearing upon all phases of railroao 
transportation, and the issuing of but 
letins and statiscal summaries, dc 
signed to present a national picture 
of railroads, their operation, and 
costs. 

The railroads contributing to the 
support of this institution, through 
it enabled to understand what all 
railroads arc doing, and get a com- 
plete vision of national railroad op- 
eration, find it a most vaiable ad- 
junct to their business. 

Such an organization is needed in 
that other growing and vitality im- 
portant transportation field, the 
highway world. For highways are 
rapidly becoming much more than 
mere connecting links between farm 
and town, city and country, over 
which the farmer drives his grain 
and pigs, and hauls his household 
supplies. With the invreasirrg usv o: 
the automobile as a passenger car- 
rier and the truck as a means of 
freight transportation, the highway- 
is coming to take its place in the 
Nation, not as a secondary system, 
but as a primary or arterial trans- 
port system, which will, in a few 



The presidential campaign Is in 
full swing, with politicians scurrying 
B every direction in the interest <>f 
t*>°ir respective favorites. 

In the republic™ camp tV- open 
ifc'-tiu fight seens tr be between 
President CooUdge a- d Senator Ili- 
•am Johnson of California. 

In the mists of the background 
Stands a towering sphinx in the per- 
son of Former Governor Lojsd>n of 
iDmoifl, silent as the grave, but with 
m- 1 -.ons watering Latently his cveiv 
stove 

*■ *nl"U i'!'. ;l .< ■■ Vi -'r " ] I); I, ,» 

as openly wa*i g \ . r on 'he prcsi- 
«Ueni. - U«- !•>*. --K h poten' p ■•■;;) 

it j. 

Others have ambitions, some are 
possible, but few have achieved any 



short years, rival the lailroads ii 
tonnage, if not in speed. • 

A Bureau of Highway Traffic Eco- 
nomics will enable all road makers, 
road planners, and road organiza- 
tions to function more perfectly, 
make more progress, save more mon- 
ey, and use roads more efficiently. 

"But who will do it?" The Nation 
musst do it. Its ceenV '•" *»it one 
more argument for the establish- 
ment of a policy of national highay 
building, and national road using, 
by which the National Government 
will not only build, pay for, and for- 
ever maintain a system of national 
roads, but will, through some organi- 
zation laid down along similar lines 
to the Bureau of Railwav Economics 
make it possible for all highway users 
to employ these roads with the great- 
est economy and efficiency. 



»*»«»■■■«■■■■■.■...,,,, 

(O t>v Margaret Bnyd.) 

"But life, being weary of thee* worldly 

bars, 
Never lacks power to dismiss itself." 
— Julius Caesar. 
"Why Is suicide held not to be 
right?" was one of the questions put 
to Socrates during that last long talk 
he had with Ms friends while he 
waited for his Jailer to bring hiui the 
cup of poison. 

According to Plato's account, Soc- 
rates answered : "I suppose you won- 
der why . . . when a Atari Is better 
dead he is not permitted to be his own 
benefactor, hut must wait for the hand 
of another. . . . I admft the appear- 
nncp of inconsistency, but there may 
not be any real inconsistency, after all, 
In this. There is a doctrine uttered In 
secret that man Is a prisoner who has 
no right to open the door of his prison 
and run away; this is a great mystery 
which I do not quite understand." 

Our western laws and churches hold 
suicide to he wrong, and there is a 
general feeling that when a man com- 
mit* suicide, he breaks the ruies by 
which the game of life Is played. We 
know that in a race, for example, a 
man is expected to finish the course, 
even though all the other runners have 
crossed the line an hour before him. 
To the bystanders there seems no sense 
In this. To them It secfiiK that after 
enough men have crossed the line to 
score all the points that can he scored. 
the other runners liquid be allowed to 
step over the side lines and quit the 
race. They cannot see any reason for 
making a man run afte>- all chances of 
scoring seem over; but the truiiier sees 
reason in the proceedings. Life Is fre- 
quently likened to a race. 

Some people hold that the two cases 
are not analogous because the player 
enters a race voluntarily and we hu? 
man beings are born into life without 
our consent. Others hold that we do 
enter life voluntnrily. The latter be- 
lieve, with Socrates and the Ruddhists, 
In the transmigration of the soul. They 
insist that the soul that does not wish 
for life Is not reincarnated. 

This Is, of course, a subject about 
which nobody knows, though many may 
speculate, trying to twist texts this 
way and that to suit their own be- 
liefs. 




C. H. YOUELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Priest. 

Burlington, Xy. 



Phone Burlington 65 



DR. T. B. CASTLfeMAN, 

H^DBNTIST^^ 

In my new office 

Clayola Place, Florence, KV. 

Teeth extracted painless. Bridge 

and Plate Work a Specialty. 

AH Work Guaranteed 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohan Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



|Tj is for Ulysses cutting the green, 

•J*-" A better young gardener never was seen". 

Find two other rardtnere Right side down, in the (ran Top tide down, ilotif hefr. 



degree o f p r omin e nc e in the proj0.1t 

■USB. 

'It is a merry fight in he republi- 
' .can uam t «, with the vi.;tor yet to be 
i aamed. 

' ©emocratically speaking, the two 
outstanding personages are Former 
■Secretary of the Treasuy William 
Cirbs McAdoo and Senator Oscar W. 
Jind* rwood. 

Both are so strong in their party 
■' ii is difficult to predict who will be 
\ the democratic standard bearer. 

.One thing however, seems morally 
«3ertaln in this presidential cam- 
gaign. The mantle of leadership in 
*oth parties will fall upon politica 
giants who are known by their deeds 
aaid not merely through the praise of 
campaign orators and spellbinders. 

We have nothing to fear, which 
.ever way it goes. 



As you begin the new year speak 
a good word for our schools, and our 
churches, and ojir business and pro- 
fessional men, and our Neighbors 
■atad friends, and for humanity in 
general. 

Speak a good word for the com- 
munity, and keep on peaking, until 
others get the habit and begin speuk- 
«ng with you. 

it is a good thing for the town, 
and in t: em will begin to bt,« aa 

•rell of you. 

Good times are prophesisied for 
19S4 and if every person in this 
community begins now to lay up a 



It is high time the legislative and 
judicial "authorities began to consid- 
er the crime (the word is used ad- 
visedly) of drunkenness when driv- 
ing a motor car as something infin- 
itely more serious than is drunken- , 
ness under ordinary circumstances.) 
Prohibition is as yet too new for the 
world old opinion of the drunken ' 
man, as one to be laughed at, pitied, 
Perhaps, put to bed to sober up, fin- 
ed a small sum as a public nuisance, 
to change, at least overnight. 

But drunkenness which can harm 
no one but the inebriated man is one ' 
thm K ; drunkenness which is menace 
to all who use the streets and roads, 
and which via the car, converts the 
otherwise innocuous victim of his 
appetite to a potentially wholeoalo 



murderer, is entirely something else. 
Sentiment is swinging over to re- 
tarding the drunken driver as one. 
who commits moe than a misde- 
meanor; but it should swing faster 
and go further. The man who, 
drunk, drives a car or truck, is a 
madman; a man without sense, with- 
out reasonability, without judgment. 
He puts in jeopardy the lives of men 
women, and children. He endangers 
property. He may cause frightful 
ioss of life, hideous mamings, terri- 
ble accidents. No maniac with a gun 
is allowed upon the streets; the man 
who deliberately makes himself a 
maniac" and fits himself out with a 
car loaded with potential death for 
many, should be dealt with with the 
utmost severity. A few dollars' fine 
a few days in jail, the loss of a li- 
cense, are not enough. The man who 
runs amuck with a gun, killing and 
maiming, gets years behind the bars. 
The man who runs amuck with a 
car while drunk is even more cul- 
pable. 

Let judges once get it thru their 
precedent bound legal minds that it 
U not the drunkenness, but the 
drunken driving which is the crime, 
and our already crowded hard roads 
will be safer for us all; our children 

n driven,, an well «... 
sober citizens protected, a.s they have 
h rijrht to be, from a menace which 
has no exchse, legal „, loclaL for 
existing. 



Hang up another record for radio. 
Radio audience tuned-in Monday ev- 
ening, Dec. 10th, at 9 o'clock and 
heard the W .L. W. broadcasting 
station of the Crosley Manufactr- 
ing Co., Cincinnati, announce the 
beginning of a record-breaking ex- 
periment. A microphone was placed 
in the studio of the Vacalstyle Mu- 
sic Company, Cincinnati, and con- 
nected by special line to the broad- 
casting statiin, for use in letting 
the world listen to the making of <i 
n.usic roll of the origmal radio song, 
'Somebody Else." The recording was 
done ii less than an hour, and tho 
selection reproduced and broadcast 
within that time. This establishes & 
world record for it usually take:; 
abuut a week in the making of a re- 
production piano loll. ' 

Pr feeding the recording of the 
song, the Elmer Aichele Orchetra 
played ii_ Mr. Aichele, in associa- 
tion with William Schmidt, compos- 
ed "Somebody Else." Then, Mr. H. 
G. Miller of the Vocalstyie Music 
exp lai n e d how the pi < 



Richer Milk— More Profit 

To make money out of dairy farming in these times you 
must have a feed that is absolutely top-notch in milk pro- 
ducing and butter fat producing quality, yet which you can 
buy at a price that will yield you a good profit on your 
dairy products. 

Ce-re-a-lia Sweets, will give your Cv,*i s the essential ma- 
terials for making milk and butter fat, at absolutely the 
lowest cost. 

Four Weeks' Trial At Our Risk 

heed Ce-rc-a-lia Sweets to any cow in your herd for four 
weeks. If she doesn't give more milk or better milk if she 
doesn't show you a. bigger profit, we will 
refund every cent of your money. 

SOLD BY 



Early & Daniel, Covington, Ky 
Early & Da.de I, Erlanger, Ky 




THE TUXEDO 
LINE OF FEEDS 

Ce-re-a-lla Sweets 

Dairy Tuxedo 

Tuxedo Chop 

Tuxedo Hoe Ration 

Tuxedo Pigeon Feed 

Tuxedo Egg Mash 

Tuxedo Scratch 

Tuxedo Chick 

Tuxedo Buttermilk 

Starter and Growing 

Muh 

Tuxedo Developer 

etc. 



,J< 



if 



^Jfi|l» 




FREE— Ask for JR'g 

booklet — a valuable 
guide to dairy feeding 
— free. 




| IS 



SsIL 



Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets 



THE HOME BOOKSHELVES 



be played for recording. During the 
lime it took to complete the making 
of the music roll until it was repro- 
duced, a program ef music given, 
interspersed with explanatory talk-j 
of what was taking place in the re- 
cording laboratory. 

This is the first time that the re- 
cording of a piano selection and the 
making of a music roll was broad- 
cast, and it proved that many forms 
of hitherto little known subjects 
were adaptable to radio broadcast- 
ing. Thus, does radio again move 
forward as an important force in the 
broadcasting of subjects, both inter- 
esting and educational. Many of the 
radio listeners were thus enabled to 
gain a knowledge of the mechanical 
procedure experienced in the re- 
cording of a piano selection. 

MIGHT HELP 

"I wish I knew how to get people 
out to church Sunday night, sighed 
the discouraged pastor. 

"Well, parson," said his hard-boil- 
ed friend, "if you would substitute a 
six-reel comedy for the sermon, give 
'em jazz instead of hymns, and 
charge 40 cents admission, including 
war tax, instead of taking up a col- 
lection, you might get the place fill- 
'vn i' ./as a church." 
nam 

Swiss watchmakers can split a 
hair into ,100 strips and measure the 
thickness, so exact are then tools. 



City people may imagine that the 
country homes are not well provid- i 
ed wjth reading matter. If they j 
would look at the tables loaded with ' 
tewspapers and magazines, and the 
well filled bookshelves in many of 
our homes, they would change the J r 
minds. 

A survey of Orange township, 
Iowa, made several years ago by the 
Iow a st.atp rnllpgp of agriculture, 

showed that 69 homes had a total of 
7355 books, or an average of 106 
volumes each. No doubt these homes 
have still more books now. It is i 
rsther vital matter to select volumes 
well for home ownership, as the 
young people get many ideas from 
them. It makes a big difference 
whether such literature consists 
largely of trashy novels, or of stand- 
ard works on literature and history. ! 
Usually the country faily's library ' 
is a very choice selection. 

Our tears for the departed year. 
Our smiles for the one that has come. 
But remember the poor and needy at 
this holiday time, as God in His 
mercy has remembered you. 

The fact that the business of farm- 
ing has usually been conducted in 
certain ways, does not surely prove 
that it should always be done just 
the same. 




Better Than Traps For Rata 

Write. Adama Drug Co.. TtXS) 
The; bit: "RAT-SNAP la dorns tho work 
and the rat undertaken are aa buiy aa pop 
cornoaabotatove." Try K on ytrar rata. 
RAT-SNAP la a "nxjneybaek" guaranteed 
aura killer. Cornea ready lot uae ; no mix- 
ins with other food*. CaU and dogs won't 
touch it. Rata dry up and leave do ameU. 
Three eizea: 86c for one room; 66o for 
hrni aa e r e h laka n yar d t S1J 8 far ba meaad> 
outbufldinga. Start killing- rata today. 

Galley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky 
D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky 



All United States mail planes are 
to be equipped with wireless. 



A Rat That Didn't Smell After 
C Being Dead for Three Months 

"tiwear It wmt dead three months. "write* Mr. J. 
Sykn(N.J). "I»aw tbia rat evary day: put torn* 
Kit-Soap behind a barrel. MontiMailerwardi.my 
wife lor* *db» M ' - t barrel. There it m -dead. '? 
ttat-Aaan atUa la Uuae aim twr »V . 04s. ft Ji. 
6«ad and guaranteed by 

I). It. Hl.vthe, Hftrllugton. Ky. 
Oullety at P«ttlt, Burlington, Ky 



FLIPNESS AND FLAPNESS 

A writer in a current publication 
desires the tendency toward flipness 
in the young people of today. He 
considers it demoralizing to true 
manhood and womanhood. 

True, every word of it — lament- 
ably true. 

But he might have gone further 
and equally deplored the tendency 
of many parents to encourage flip- 
ness and flapness in their offspring. 

There are some parents who ex- 
ercise exceeding care in the training 
of their children, and such children 
invariably mature into real men and 
women. 

There are others who calmly watch 
their sons develop into shieks and 
their daughters into flippers and 
flappers without an apparent effort 
to prevent this deformity of mind 
and perversion of intellect. 

The parent who has no thought of 
tomorrow can hardly expect the 
child to heed the dangers of today. 

Place the responsibility where it 
belongs, drive it home and perhaps 
some good may come of it. 

No other course will avail. 



f. W. Kassebaum & Sop 

««»H1TE 4 BiRBLE 

MONUMENTS, 

B Large 8toth on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

IIS Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Govern and Open 
Door Curtains for all make of cars, 

FURNITURE, BUGGIES & WAGONS 

Reupholatered, and Celluloid 

Lights Replaced. 



People 2 

I ad 



ho use tho 
I a s s i f i ed 
ads in this 
papor profit by thorn. 
Tho little ads bring quick 
rosults. What havo 
you for salo or want to 
to buy. Tho cost is too 
smaU to consider 






J. C. GORDON 
Suporintondont of Schools 

OF BOONE COUNTY 

Will be In his office In Burlington 

the first and second Monday ami 

the third and fourth Saturday 

in each month. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by o4dver- 
tising. 



N. F. PENN, M D 
^B^S Covington 

We Test Eyes Right 

and 

Make Glasses That Fit 
st 
Reasonable Prices ' 

WITH IfOTCB 61S MADISON AVK 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

TAJCI YOUR COUHTT PAPftJL 

READ YOUR _ 
COUNTY PAPER 
$1.50 The Year. 

Sabaerfbr for the RE ORDR« 



♦♦♦< 



In time of peace, prepare to lick 
the othsr fellow if you don't want to 
get Ucked. 



ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE. 



Notice is hereby given that all per- 
sons indebted to the estate of B. W. 
Nelson must pay same to me. All 
persons who have claims against saW 
estate mast present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. 

COLIN KELLY. 
Admr. with the will annexed. 



OONE COUNTY RECORLER 



PAGE FTVE 



* 



BOONE CO. RECORDER coolidce had 

Published every Thursday 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



DIFFICULT TASK 



I Foreign Advertinint Representative 

_THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 

Entered at the Postofnce, Burling- 
ton, Ky., as second-clast mail. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 

Furniihed on application. The 
value of the RECORDER a* an ad- 
vertiiint medium it unqueatioaed. 
The character of the edverttaementa 
How in It* colunni, and toe namber 
of them, tell the whole etory. 



The Recorder Stand* For 

BETTER FARMING, BETTER CIL 

IZENS, BETTER HOMES" 



This and That. 



TURN ME OVER 



Another thing this country needs 
is less wire pulling and more weed 
pulling. - : ""- 

Instead of passing laws, it looks 
as if the present Congress would be 
busy passing the buck. 

These girls who wear the extreme- 
ly fuzzy hair ought to excite a good 
deal of admiration in Africa. 

Some folks deny that they are not 
interested in literature, as they al- 
ways read the sporting news. 

The most effective way to simplify 
the income tax for the ordinary man 
will be to reduce its amount. 

The motorist finds his patience 
severely taxed by the tacks that lie 
around the streets and bust his tires. 

In Germany they form lines to get 
bread, while in this country they do 
the same thing to get ice cream soda. 

The students home for the Xmas 
holidays have usually learned the 
popular songs and college yells any- 
way. 

'Nother thing needed in this coun- 
try is less bootlegging, and more 
mutton legging on the family dinner 
table. 

bandits are reported 
busy year, hut the 
a still busier one in 



It is doubtful if any president 
since Lincoln has had a more diffi- 
cult task to perform that that which 
fell to President Coolidge in pre- 
senting his first message to Congress. 
In addition to the fact that his own 
candidacy and political future was 
involved, r. Coolidge was confronted 
with divided opinions by expeirenc- 
ed party leaders on the most impor- 
tant subjects, and he was literally 
compelled to make a stand with the 
full knowledge that his desires would 
be ignored in the scramble of indi- 
vidual fence-building on the Con- 
gressional floor. His attitude regard- 
ing most questions was pretty gen- 
erally understood before the message 
was presented, and that may ac- 
count, in some measure, for the 
lack of enthusiasm expressed in pub- 
lic sentiment. A tried and trained 
observer from Massachusetts states 
that the President's reference to the 
League of Nations was applauded by 
many Republicans, but no Democrats 
his views against cancellation of war 
debts evoked general applause; only 
one Democrat expressed approval of 
the Mellon tax reduction plan; only 
Republicans applauded his poosal to 
eliminate tax-exempt securities; his 
opposition to a soldier's bonus fell 
on an almost silent house; favoring 
a constitutional amendment prhibit- 
ing child labor was greeted with om- 
inous silence, and his declaration for 
sr irtrlclreniofcement of the prohibi- 
tion amendment evoked but little 
applause. In one particular, how- 
ever, President Coolidge's message 
deserves and receives unanimous ac- 
claim. He made no attempt to cam- 
ouflage or side-step any question. He 
left no doubts as to his meaning. In 
this respect his message finds a ready 
elcome, even in the hearts of hiss 
political opponents. 







._ilK J$> r\j| 



- Trade Where They All Trade 




WE WISH ALL OUR 
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS 

A VERT 
HAPPY NEW YEAR. 



oil 
tisccl 

^t v&e wajy locks f 



THE FARM BOYS AND GIRLS 



people who object to paying 
might emigrate to Africa 
no government has to be sup- 



Thieves and 
to ha-v" h«d n 
jails may have 
1924. 

Not many stores that advertised 
their Christmas stocks well have 
found any fault witr the business 
done. 

The 
taxes 
where 
ported. 

The slow pay folks will not ob- 
ject if many of the January 1 bills 
are lost in the holiday rush of mail 
matter. 

The women folks are all trying to 
keep slender, and they can do it all 
right as far as their purses are con- 
cerned. 

Looks as if a first class locksmith 
could find a job in Washington this 
winter breaking the deadlocks in 
Congress. 

The only Christmas present that a 
great many Americans got from the 
government was the reminder to pay 
their income tax. 

The people . who used to make 
themselves popular among the kids 
by distributing pennies, may have to 
shell out dimes now. 

Although the .tramps have gone 
south to avoid snow handling, there 
is danger lest they get set to work 
hoeing early vegetables. 

Many people can't think out any 
political opinions for themselves, but 
there are always places where they 
tan secure some second hand ones. 

The new one dollar bills are out 
with a picture of Washington on 
them, but George would be shocked 
to know how little work they will do. 

ohat has been needed in the post- 
offices for to weeks has been a good 
gang of snow shovellers to make a 
— path — through the— C hri o tmnB pack 
ages. 

Men have usually succeeded in 
politics by their ability as harmoniz- 
ers, while women may be able to 
make good in this line by charmon- 
izing 

While there is opposition to en- 
tangling alliances with the European 
nations, everybody is willing to meet 
with them to receive payments on 
their debts. 

President Coolidge has nominated 
some 2000 people to office, but there 
were some 110,998,000 people in the 
country who failed to find their 
names in the list. 

A taxpayer needs to be wide awake 
when he makes out hia income re 
turn, but it may become necessary 
to put him under ether when he 
comes to pay the bill. 

The president is complained of for 
not being more talkative, but he 
might offer some remarks if several 
of his automobile tires got punctur- 
ed out on some lonely road. 

Some of these Get Rich Quick 
stock sellers will probably be inter- 
ested in the report that the farmers 
are going to have $1,250,000,000 
more money than they did last year. 

A M*liUry nm;i used by the Brit- 
ish at the battle of Bunker Hill, re- 
cently sold at an auction room in 
London for $950. The map, H inches 
antiare, bears the signature of Ma 
ioi General Sir Henry Clinton. 




President Cooidge has accepted 
the office of honorary president of 
the Boys and Girls Farm Clubs. Per- 
haps none of the honors that he has 
received comes any loser toe his heart 
than this. And e recently sent a mes- 
sage to these clubs, that he hopes to 
see their membership doubled and 
tripled. 

There was a time when the farm 
boys and girls were mostly isolated 
units. They had little organized life 
of their own. The old motto that 
"children should be seen and not 
heard" applied to their life. They 
helped around the home, but they 
were an inconspicuous factor, whose 
desires were not considered much. 
Many a boy's heart was hurt when 
Father made him work on July 4th 
or circus day when the town kids 
were having high jinks. 

Today the farm boys and girls are 
joining a conscious movement with 
purposes of their own. About 700,- 
000 of them have joined the clubs 
the aim of which is better agricul- 
tural production and home useful- 
ness. This gives them a chance to 
make use of their own powers, and 
develop thei« own initiative. 

A multitude of boys and girls are 
not satisfied with the old fashioned 
ways. They may have some extrav- 
agant notions, yet no doubt many of 
their ideas gained in school and else- 
where are good. 

The club work gives them a chance 
to try out their new ideas. In many 
cases they have convinced the old 
folks that modern plans pay better 
than the old time methods did. These 
clubs take young people who are 
keenly anxious for a chance to work 
out their own projects and manifest 
their own initiative, and give them a 
chance to see what they can do. The 
result is a great change in their in- 
terests and ambitions It means that 
instead of getting discontented, they 
are becoming enthusiastic about 
country life. 



Don't cough 

at night! 

AVOID wakefulness by taking 
/\Dr. Bell's Pine-Tar Honey 
just before goingto bed. It loosens 
phlegm, soothes irritation in 
throat and chest and prevents 
the exhausting coughing spasms. 
Made of just the medicines that 
up-to-date doctors recommend— 
combined with the old-time 
favorite, pine-tar honey. Its taste 
is pleasant, too! Keep Dr. Bell's 
on hand for all the family. 

All druggists. Be sure to get 
the genwine. 

DR. BELL'S Pine -Tar Honey 



"Do Rats Talk to Each Other?" 
Aska Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 

"I Rot five cakes of Rat-Snap anrl throw pieces 
around feci store (Jot about half a Juzcn dciJtaU 
a day fat two solid weeks. Suddenly, they (M (ewer. 
Now we haven't any. Who told them about RaU 
Snap " Rats dry up and leave no smell. Three 
tilts: 35c, 65c, $1.25. 

Sold and guaranteed by 

Gulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R. Blytbe, Burlington, Ky. 



We have a DeVoe Calendar and Weath- 
er Chart for you free. Come in and 

get it. 



We hope to be as well remembered in 

1924 as we were in 1923. 

WE THANK YOU. 



Kansas Kream Flour. 



Arcade Flour. 







^ 



WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seedand Grocery House"- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18-20 West Seventh St. 
Phone, South 335 and 336 COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 



J 



Outfit for Little Missy 




GLVE THE BOY THE CHANCE OF 
THE CHICKENS 



At the recent Country Life Con- 
ference in St. Louis, a moving pic- 
ture film was shown of a farm boy 
and his prize flock of chickens. The 
film demonstrated that the ' birds 
were fine because the bop had a 
scientific knowledge of chicken cul- 
ture, and that he had applied his 
knowledge to the care of his flock. 
But the boy was a mouth breatli.'r 
and showed further effects of mal- 
nutrition. The tragic thing about 
the pu-tv:re was that the chickens 
were having a better chance than tho 
bey. 

The id«a of encouraging farm 
children to raise thoroughbred poul- 
tjy and live stock is wholesome. It 
should be promoted to a greater de- 
gree than it is at present. On the 
othc r hand, it must be borne in mind 
that the greatest asset of the farm 
is neiiher it* live stock nor its poul- 
try, but its boys and girls. They 
themselves are entitled to as scien- 
tific care as they are taught to give 
the animals that they raise. In or- 
der to develop into a strong man or 
woman every child must have a well- 
Inlanced diet which is eaten at reg- 
ular periods long hours of sleep in 
3 well ventilated room; activity as 
expressed in wholesome work, study 
and play; instruction concerning the 
care of the. body; and periodic phy- 
sical examinations by a reliable phy 
sir Ian. 

While the city folks are pitying the 
lonlineaa of the country towns in 
winter, the country people may l»> 
worrying how to find any evenings 
free from engagements. 



BRIEF NATURE STUDIES 

The wrist contains eight bones, 
the palm five and the finger." four- 
teen. 

The tongue of a seventy-foot 
whale has been known to yield as 
much as a ton of-oil. 

Of about 2,000 kinds of bacteria 
only about 100 are believed to be 
harmful. 

Once a species of plant has lost 
its perfume there is no known way 
of restoring it. 

In a single day a spider can con- 
sume nearly times its own weight in 
food. 

The human jaw possesses only 8 
muscles, but these exercise a force 
of nearly a quarter of a ton. 

Camels enjoy the distinction of 
being among the only domestic ani- 
mals that cannot trace their par- 
entage to any species existing U1 a 
wild state. 

About 500 species of plants are 
carniverous. Through modified leavea 
they imprison their prey, which sub- 
sequently is digested and absorbed. 
Sundew, flytraps, pitcher plants and 
butterworts are among the animal- 
eating plants. 

PIANO MARES FOR SALE 
Before prohibition struck the coun- 
t r y a Mi ss ouri farm e r a rr a ng e d w i th 




REDUCTION cf TAXATION 

IS NOT A MATTER OF PARTISAN POLITICS i 

i Copyright, IMS, by National Budget Committee 



SOMEWHERE along 
the line in the cur- 



rent discussion 



the editor of his country weekly to 
have some sale bills struck off. The 
weather being dry and hot, the edi- 
tor took a snifter from an ice-cold 
jug, then another to quench his 
thirst. His legs felt kinda wobbly 
but his head was clear as a bell and 
to work faster he set type with both 
hands. When the farmer started to 
tacking up his bills he discovered 
they were more than ordinarily in- 
teresting: 

Twenty-five cows, broke to work; 
41 head of cultivators; 10 head of 
shoveling boars with scoops by side; 
3 piano mares; 120 rods of canvas 
belting better than new; DeLaval 
cow with ice cream attachments; 
McCormick binder, in foal, Poland 
China bobsled due to farrow in April 
14 head of chickens with grass seed 
attachments in good working order; 
two J. I. Case riding heifers, good 
as new; spraying outfit, can be rid- 
den by children; 15 billy goats, 70 
bushel capacity with spraying noz- 
zle, and other articles too numer- 
ous to mention. 

That printer's right hand didn't 
know what his left was doing. 



Although grandma or auntie should 
fail to knit a new sweater for her 
this fall, little Missy will not be com- 
fortless. The knitting mills are 
turning out thousands of sweaters and 
caps for girls — little and big — and just 
keeping up with the demand for 
them. A pretty slip-over style, with 
cap to match, is pictured hero and the 
cap Is trimmed with crocheted Mowers. 



LUDENS 

HLNTHOL CDUGH CROPS 
for nose and throat 

Give Quick Relief 




JOHN T. PRATT 

Chairman 

National Budget Committee 



\X Children >>*j 
W- and Older Folk > 

eaua*manycaa*anfconetip«*'° n ; 
flatulence, headache, naueea. bad 
breath, aleepleeeneae and emacia- 

FREY*S VERMIFUGE 

Ma .^cJeWaatilonad remedy foe 
u_nai. |a we t or ova* aanraerty- 
eWayaawa. 

JO mnt» a bett *» 
at yoor oWara. of aent by mail on 
rooaapf of pnea. 

111 lair !■ *■*■ 

Ba manor*. Ma. 



tax reduction there has 
been interjected the sol- 
emn asseveration that 
Secretary Mellon's pro- 
posal is a Republican 
policy and as such oug 
to be opposed by the 
Democratic Party. It 
was apparently inevi- 
table that an attempt 
would be made to bring 
this consideration be- 
fore the people, and that 
not a few Senators and 
Representatives who had 
been paralyzed by the 
straightforwardness and 
persuasiveness of the 
letter to Mr. Green 
would regain their tongues at the 
mention of party policy, and this 
despite the fact that of all the 
things in the world that are ill- 
defined, obscure and debatable, 
the respective policies of the two 
great political parties in this coun- 
try are the most poorly defined, 
the most obscure and the most de- 
batable. 

If tax reduction could be denom- 
inated as a Republican policy, then 
it would follow that tax reduction 
was not a Democratic policy. 
Tax reduction not being a Demo- 
cratic policy we should naturally 
expect that any favorable mention 
of it would be rigorously excluded 
from Democratic platforms and 
that Democrats standing for elec- 
tion would boldly proclaim their 
opposition to it in asking for the 
suffrage of their constituents. An 
examination of party platforms 
dur in g recent years and out best 
recollection as to the addresses of 
Democratic candidates for office 



discloses' no such oppo- 
sition to tax reduction. 
If opposition to tax re- 
duction is a Democratic 
policy, Democrats have 
been supremely success- 
ful in keeping that fact 
to themselves. 

The truth.is. n( course,, 
that tax reduction has 
nothing whatever to do 
with partisan politics. 
Scientific tax reduction, 
such as that which is 
now proposed, is based 
upon the fact that pros- 
pective revenues exceed 
proposed expenditures. 
The essential factor is 
that not more should be 
taken from the people 
in taxes than is required 
for the efficient conduct of the 
Government. If the tax reduc- 
tion program goes through dur- 
ing the present session of Con- 
gress, it will not be because the 
Republicans put it through. At 
the present moment its opponents 
number as many Republicans as 
they do Democrats. President 
Coolidge may urge the Mellon 
plan upon Congress, but his appeal 
must be to Congress as a whole 
and not to his Republican adher- 
ents. Those who support it will 
go into the next campaign on their 
personal record as conservers of 
the public welfare, as the support- 
ers of a measure that has no more 
to do with the respective policies" 
of the Republican and Democratic 
parties than has voting the salaries 
of ambassadors. Tax reduction is 
not a party matter and he who 
tries to make anyone believe it is, 
shows himself neither a good par- 
tisan nor a wortby public repre- 
sentative. v 



Established 1886. 



in The 

NEW YEAR 

RIGHT 



When a German circus man, about 
to go to Etuth America with his 
■haw, ndv< t'.ied for 300 acrobats 
and other performers, *"i "• «•«>•• <jU 
applications from 00,000, ranging 
from former Uhlan officers to day la 
borera, many offering a bonus in the 
form of potato* i If tl«y obtained pa 
iltfafll 



In 21 states of the Union there 
is "taxation chaos" and it is almost 
■impossible to entangle the mass. 
Throughout the United States more 
than 20 per cent of all wealth es- 
: capes its just burden, while federal, 
■tats and local taxes take nearly 
20 i>tr cent of the total income of the 
nation. Its a heavy burden, and 
Mill «M haSTJiT unlets tome method 
of preventing un enormous waste bo 
udopted. 

hVw iwople get what they want 
until they first earn what they get. 



Opening a bank account is 
beginning. Adding to it gives 
and satisfied teeling of security, 
your energy and insures your 
tinue in the same way. This 
become a depositor and 

GROW WITH IT 



the most practical 
you a comfortable 



It also stimulates 
future, if you con- 
bank invites you to 



Boone 6o. Deposit Bank 

Burlington. Kentucky. 



Subscribe For The Recorder $1.50 per yemr 

Try It One Year- You'll Likelt. 



W^ mm 



BOONE COUNTY R ECOEDKE 



NONPARIEL PARK 

Rnhrv' H"«fnt\ is on the sick list 
■with rheumatism. 

Little Bobbie Rouse, Jr., has been 
ignite ill thi' nn it week. 

Mrs. Jot- Baxter has been on t'c 
sick Ilr.I the past wcok. 

Mrs. L H. Thompson, of Shelby 
*trect, is on the sick list. 

Harold Smith is on the sick list 
with a ease of tonsilitis. - 

Harold S. ith, of the I.ay.ie Farm, 
Vhad for hi.- jrue.st Buster Stephens. 

Miss Ola Carpenter, who has been 

*yery ill, is improving at this writin," . 

Oh, Boys, wedding 1 ells will soon 

■be ringinu in Florence. Leap year, 

. girls. 

Miss Minnie Cahill has been quit? 
ill with a ease .if grippe the post 
- week. 

A large crowd attended Sam Harit- 
■niciTti .iaie Thursday. Everyt'fiing 
«old well. 

W. T. Bushy and wife entertained 
at dinner Xmas day Albert Lucas 
and family. 

Shelley Aylor and family, of Gun 
powder, were utiests of L P. Aylo' 
Xmas day. 

Mrs. Cha- Ayl«»V and i da ught r; 
spent Xmas day with Mrs. Mat Rou^r 
51 Erlanger. 

Floyd f'hipn'.:!»i ri'turned home al- 
ter a delightful visit with relatives 
in Dayton, Ohio. 

The little daughter of Mr. an i 
Mrs. Harry Leidy has a had case of 
whooping cough. 

Miss Bridget (Vary had rn>- her 
guest Wednesday, Miss Anna Hun 
dey, ef Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Mike CahiH entertained V.'e .. 



lenfgbbr ami (faugh 



had for he; 
Mamie Robin 



jbesday Mrs. E 
ter, o f Covington. 

Mi :..'• Eva Renaker 
gurst Xmas eve. Mis 
>on, of Kichwdod. 

G. M. Martin and wife spent Xmas 
«l«.y at Burlington with Misses Lizzij 
and Sallie Rogers. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. (i. Renaker spei t 
Xmas evening in Cincinnati, and at 
tended the theatre. 

Russell House and wife taken sur.- 
per Xmas eve. with A. M. House an«.' 
wife, of Covington. 

Russell Mitchell ii (] wife spenl 
Xmas d.iy with Mr. ,<■ d Mrs. C. R 
Kindara, of Erlangar. 

Miss Hattie May Bradford had for 
fter guests Xmas day, Miss Eva Ren- 
" a-:id Rev. Gillespie. 
J G Renc.-k<er and wife taken sup 



the past week Mrs. Gray and Mr. 
Grant, of Burlington. 

A. S. Lucas and family entertain- 
ed with a turkey dinner Xmas day), 
in honor of Emmett Baxter and fam- 
ily, of Locland, Ohio. 

Mrs. Addie Hutehson left for Ten- 
nessee to Spend the holidays with her 
sister. Miss Laura Lucas and Mrs 
Effice Secrets and family. 

Miss Irena Aylor entertained wit'' 
a party Kmas eve. in honor of i 
number of friends. A most enjoyable 
evening was spent together. 

Jerry Conrad sold his farm near 
Devon, last week for $10,000 to .1 
Covington party. C. T. Claunch, of 
Erlanger, made the sale. 

Mrs. Robinson was taken to a hos- 
pital last week to have her eye op 
crated on, which she has suffered 
with very much the past week. 

J. 2. ru.^st** and family of the 
Dixie Highway, entertained with .1 
Xmas dinner her mother Mrs. Beck- 
er and two sisters, of Cincinnati. 
• Mr. and Mrs. William Collins, of 
I the Dixie Highway, have for their 
I guest his sister, Miss Collins, of 
' Crittenden, during the holidays. 
1 Geo. Smith wife and daughu-r 
! Edna, spent Wednesday and Thurs- 
day with Abdon and family and 

Eil. Shinkle and wife, of Big Bone. 
Miss Hattie May Bradford, of 
Louisville, is spending the holidays 
with her mother, Mrs. Wm. Bradford 
and brothers Russell and Charles 
Bradford. 

Mrs. W. Lee and children, .ia\e 
returned to their home at Cynthian-i. I 
Ky., aft er e njoying a delightful vir v 
here ith her sister. Miss Eva Rena 
ker and brothers. 
•I. G. Renaker and wife, Paul Ren- 
aker and Miss Eva Renaker, atetnd- 



LIMABURG 

Homer Jones butchered hogs last 
Wednesday. 

Wilda Beemon was shopping in the 
city Xmas eve. 

Miss Rosetta Glass spent Wednes- 
day in the city. 

Mrs. Dean. is visiting her daughter, 1 
Mrs. J. P. Brothers. j 

Mrs. J. P. Brothers was on the 
rick list the past week. 



PAGE 



HOPEFUL 

Miss Charlotte Bradford is visa- 
ing relatives in Covington. 

Owen Aylor and wife visited M ! l- 
ton Beemon and wife, Sunday. 

Mr.;. Mallie Beemon spent a few 
days la«t week with her daughter, 
Mrs. L. C Acra. 

S. J. Robbins was called to Bur- 
lington Wednesday on account ot 
the death of liis mother. 

Mrs. ft. L. Tanner spent New 
Vear's day with her brother, Albert 
Cuy ard wife, of Newport. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bradford werd 



1863 



1924 



The Christmas tree at Hopeful vt\.\ 
attended by a large crowd. 

Mrs. Hubert and Mrs. Adern Sor- 

W H. 8 B n R SatUrdaV '1 '*£***& ., I ""• """ -"-'• «">■ I ™«onl we, 

pri H n M ' B f T n a n d J ; ck ., H ° l l Ca "- thC * Ue8ts 0ne d *y last weel < of Chn 
ed on Adern Sorrell and wife, Thurs- Hedges and family, of Union. 

,?1 01, ., , ¥ , . Mra - Hattie Creel h«d as guest 

« Joe Sorrell and wife, of Union, several days the past week Miss Mil- 

Sr »u .u day . l" ght and Sunda% lic Motherly, of Harrodsburg Ky 

Harold B*--r. returned to his Will Snyder and wife spent Sunday 
college at Springfield, .Ohio, Tuesday, with Robt. Snyder and family of 
after spending the Xmas holidays Florence 

**».£!? ^ rCnt !i WM r I , C ° rey Acra arrived "cine Monday 

Hazel Ira and Wilda Beemon en- of last week from Cropper, Ky to 

ertained Wm Dr.nkenburg and sis- spend the holidays with his parent,, 

ter Rosa, Shelby Beemon and sister L. C. Acra and wife 

Minnie, James Beemon, Cora Acra, j 

Jack Holt, Roy Sorrell Joe Richard 



Buckler and Adern Sorrell and wifc, 
Wednesday night with a card partv. 
Milton Beemon and wife enter- 
tained Hubert Beemon and wife, A. 
G. Beemon and wife, Clem Kendall 
and wife, Adern Sorrell and wife, 
and Mrs. Amanda Tanner, Haro! I 
Beemon, Hazel, Ira and Wilda Bee- 
mon and Jack Holt, of Cincinnati, 
Christmas dav. 



. ed a turkey 
j home of Mi 
j Cynthiana. 
1 Mr. and Mr 
1 Shelb-st., were 
I the bedside of 
("ruddock, who 



dinner Sunday at the 
and Mrs. Wm. Lee, of 

. Wood Stephens of 
called last week tJ 
their son-in-law Lee 
was quite ill at hi\j 



p«t with Lou Olliver and wife, of 
Covington, Tuesday night. 

Joe Scott, Jr.. and sister Agnes i, 
-.pent Xmas day with his parents .Foe 
Scott and wife of Florence. 

Miss Josie : Nnan and mothe- 
spent Smas day with Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry Aldridge, of Covington. 

Miss Jane Scott, of Villa Madona 
is Spending' the holidays with hei 
parents, Geo. Scott and wife. 

Miss Minnie Myers, of Cincinnati, 
was the guest of Dr. T. B. Castle- 
man and family, the past week. 

Jerry Conrad and family, of the 
THxic Highway, entertained a numb. , 
6f friends at dinner Thursday. 

Mrs. 'Cora Lail and son spent last 
Wednesday with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. C. Calen, of Erlanger. 

Ed. Chipman, of Sherman, Ky., 
spent a few days fast week with his 
brother, Chas. Chipman and family. 
Muss Ella May Kenney, of Villa 
Madona, spent the holidays with her 
parents, Lawrence Kennev and wif • 
C W. Myers ar;! <vHb entertain- 
ed at diner X r-.-e, >» L. H. Thomp 



home near FrancesviHe. 

The many friends here regret to 
1 hear of Mrs. Emma V. Rouse being 
I very ill at the home of Robt. Rouse 
I and wife, of Cincinnati, where they 
j are spending the winter months. 

Dr. T. B. Castleman and family 

J entertained at dinner Xmas day the 

j following guests: Miss Minnie Myers, 

j of Cincinnati. J. T. Williams "ar.d 

family, of BuHittsvjlle, and Floy.' 

• Chipman. 

Harvey Mitchell and wife (ne« 
Viola Arnold) of Philadelphia, Ohi.., 
arrived here last week to spend the 
; holidays with Wm. Arnold and wid 

* and G. K. Kindard and wife, and 
j other relatives. 

Luther Renaker and wife enter- I 

j tained with a turkey dinner Xmas 

' day, the following guests: J. D. Ren- 1 

aker and wife, of Dry Ridge, Wm. j 

Renaker and G. C. Renaker and I 

family, of Cincinnati. | 

This community was shocked to ■ 

hear of the death of Mrs. Jennie i 

Wilhoit, of Co\ington. The funeral ; 

waa held Wednesday afternoon at 

the Christian church. Bro. Runyan ! 

preached a very appropriate sermon 



W. P. Beemon and family had as 
guests Christmas day Mr. and Mrs. 
M. P. Barlow and daughter Rosa and 
Mrs. Susan Barlow. 

Mrs. Annie Beemon and family 
had as their guests Christmas day 
Tommy Easton and wife, Sam Black- 
burn wife and two children Margaret 
and Harry and Harry Dinn wife and 
daughter Jessie Lee. 

Mrs. Annie Beemon and family en- 
tertained Friday evening Mr. and 
Mrs. H. L. Tanner, Mr. and Mrs. 
Will Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Ross, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Acra, Clin- 
ton and James Beemon and Corey 
Acra. 

; AH the children and grandchildren 

j gathered at the home of Mr. Jane 
bcon-on Christmas day. The guests 
wore 0*en Aylor and wife, Ow-?n 

I Ross :.nd w.fo. Will Srydcr and wife, 
Howard Felly and family and W. L.' 

( Ki.i-i'cp.itriok and family. 

M. P. Barlow and family enter- 
j tained at their home Wednesday Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. Acra, Mr. and* Mrs. 
J W. P. Beemon, Mr. and Mrs. Harry 
j Barlow and daughter Ethel Mae, 
j Misses Etta Beemon, Minnie Bee- 
I mon and Clinton Beemon. 

Mr. and t*rB. Chester Tanner and 
daughter Elizabeth, Mr. and Mrs. 
Thos. McHenry and daughter Dor- 
othy, Mr. and Mrs. Ambrose Easton 
nnd Lloyd Tanner and little son 
Donald, spent Christmas day with 
j Mr. and Mrs. H. L Tann«^ 

Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Acra and son 



At the threshold of a New Year we find it to be an 
agreeable and worth while looking backward upon the 
year over which we have just passed to realize our ef- 
forts have not been in vain, for not only have we retain- 
ed the patronage and good- will of our old customers, but 
have gained as well the confidence of a host of new 
ones, thereby increasing the greatest of our assets. 

"Satisfied Customers" 

It is now our privilege and pleasure to again renew 
our promise to deal squarely with all who will enter 
the portals of our store where Honesty, Service and 
Co-operation reign supreme at all times. 



Miss Annie Brown has been on the 
si'k list. 

Mrs. Harriet Utz is the guest of 
William Utz. 

Miss Rosetta Glass is the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Leidy. 

Robert Brown spent Sunday with 
his mother, Mrs. Sarah Brown. 

Miss Mildred Schwartz is spending 
a few days with her sister, Mrs. Will 
Gross. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur McDuffy ar» 
spending the holidays with Mrs. 
Mary Tanner. 

Miss Elizabeth Tanner was the 

guest of her grandmother, Mrs. C. 

E. Beemon, Monday. 

I Herman Bucler and son Alton de- 

, livcred their tobacco last week, and 

received good price for it. 
I Joe Leonard Woods, the little son 
; of Mr. and Mrs. John WooOs, nas 
been very ill the past week. 

Mrs. Jim Pettit and daughter Jes- 
sie, spent a few days last week with 
Mr. .and Mrs. Zack Pettit, of Cov- 
ington. 

A. large ennvd attended the candy, \ 
social and entertainment given by | 

the. Limaburg school, and everyone \ Corey er. ertained Saturday evenhL- 
enjoyed a good time. j Mr. and Mrs. H. I, Tanner, Mr. and 

Miss busie Utz and sister Rachel, ! Mrs. Owen Ross, Mr. and Mrs Will 
and brother Leonard, and Miss Eliz- j Snyder, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barlow 
abeth Tanner, spent Monday night Mrs. Annie Beemon Misses Rosa 



30. W. HiD & Co 

Grocers and Seedsmen 

27-29 West Pike St. 26 Wttt 7th St. 

COVINGTON, KY. 

Quality and Service Store. 



VULCANIZING. * 



with Miss Kittie Brown. 



sen 
if*. 

Mts. 



nd wite aid J, hn Crouch an-] 



the holiday; 
is Huston and 



•rolinj. Huston, of Crescent 
Npnngs, is spending 
-with her parents, Lew 
wife. 

. Russell Mitchell and wife had for 
"'Trneias Saturday his brother Harvey 
Mitchell and wife, of Philadelphia 
Ohio. 

Clarence Adams and wife will 
seon have their new bungalow com- 
pleted and will mov«> to it at Els- 
were. 

' -"UP- Carrie Clark, of Covington,; 
spent the week-end with her par- 
emi», John Clark and wife of Shelby 
etreet. 

A large crowd attended the oyster 
fc-ipper Wednesday night given by 
the Rebecca lodge. A nice sum wa3 
realized. 

JSsra Carpenter, of Cincinnati, is 
spending the holidays with his par 
et»ts, Putler Carpenter and wife, of 
"Price pike. 

Emmett Baxter and son James, . f 
LoeMand, Ohio, called on his par- 
ents, Joe Baxter and wife, Tuesday 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Mamie Cahill and children, 
-are spending the week with her broth 
er Frank Michels and family, of 
Franklin, Ohio. 

J R. Boyce and wife, of Covinj- 
tea, are spending a few weeks with 
his parents, J. P. Boyce and wife, of 

Nonpariel Park. 

A number from here attended the 
1»»rty given last Saturday night at 
tfce home of J. T. Williams and wife 
vaar Bullittsville. 

Vernie Chipman of Dayton, Ohio, 
spent the holidays with his par- 
ents, Chas. Cihpman and wife, of 
the Dixie Highway. 

Lncian Layne, who attends colleg 
is spending the holidays with h' 
(parents, James Laync and wife, of 
the Dixie Highway. 

Mr. Butler and family of the Bur 
liagton pike, has purchased the P. 
Nasi farm near Buffalo Ridge, and 
wttl soon move to it. 

Lae Eddfnn and wife entertained 
Xaaaa dmy Alien Scott and family, 
Victor Middendorf and wife, and Al 
«hi Bddins and family. 

Mr. and Mra. Franw Maddox, of 
Mas Mala Highway, had for guest i 



MT. ZION. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Surface, and son I 
spent Sunday with Alan Utz and 
family. 

Miss Rachel Pottinger is spending 
and ^"e as laid to rest by the side of j the holidays with her mother at Day- 
her husband James Wilhoit, who prp | ton, Ohio. 

ceded her to the grave several years ! Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
Mr *»a m ru v . 'spent Saturday night and Sunday 

t*inh \ *u \ a ?" AyIor enter - ' with Henr y Carpenter and wife, of 
tained at their beautiful home Sun- i Florence 

FHuJrHV/' 1 " 6 ''-.,™? ?UestS were Mr and Mrs - W - E - Ghwken, Mr. | 

R„,«- Sydnor and wife, Benjamin and Mrs. Elmer Glacken and familv, } 

«.« V / amiI >'' Ma * Rause and spent Sunday with Mrs. Sarah Rob- •' 

sons, Ernest Horton and family, Mrs. inson, of Richwood. 

ctint^R. L. Ck u S< i hafer and wife ' Litt!e CTara Elizabeth Glacken 
»„J i m l B,anke , n ^ ker a nd. family spent several days last week with 
and Mr. Howard Blankenbeker. , her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. 

Edward bnyder and wife enter- , Frank Snyder, of Erlanger. 



Barlow, Minnie Beemon, Millie Math 
erly, Ora Robbins Clinton and James 
Beemon and Joe Berkshire. 



ifc 
tit 
tii 
tii 
tit 
tit 
tit 
tif 



Complete line ol Goodyear, Goodrich and Kelly- 
Springfield Tires and Tubes, good Grade of Auto- 
mobile and Tractor Oils and Grease^. 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. 

GEORGE PORIER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 



"I Coi Real Mad when I Lost My" ' 
Setting Hen," writes Mrs. Henna; 



'When I went into oar bun tod found my best 
.-.ter dead I got real mad. One package of Rat- 
Snap killed ox big rata. Poultry raisers should uae 



Rat-Snap. " Comes in cakes, no mixing. No amell 

from dead ran. Tbreesiaes. Price*. 35c.6Sc.tl.2S. 

SoM and guaranteed by 

D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Kv. 
Gulley A Pettitt, Burlington, Ky 



FOR SALE 



tained Sunday with a lovely dinner. 
The following quests were ' present 
Ben Rouse and family, of Gunpow- 
der, Chas. Aylor and family, of Flor- 
ence, Jack Schaffer and wife, of Cin 
cmnati, Ernest Horton and family 
of Hopeful, Mrs. Lou Davis and Tan 
ner Garnett and family, of Rose- 
dale, and Clint Blankenbeker and 
family. A most enjoyable dav was 



Dr. R. C. Stephens, of Earlington, 
Ky., spent the Christmas holidays 
with his mother, Mrs. Cora Steph- 
ens, returning to his home Friday af- 
ternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Glacken cele- 
brated their first wedding anniver- 
sary Sunday, Dec. 23d. Those pres- 
ent were Mr. and Mrs. Carey Car- 
penter and family, Mr. and Mrs 



pent. Old Santa Claus made them a j Henry Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. Toni 



visit in the afternoon leaving them 
many beautiful presents. 

GUNPOWDER 

Mr and Mm, J . W Rouse a re o n 



on 



the sick list. 

C. T. Davis and wife called 
this writer a few days since. 

M. F. Rouse, of near Limaburg, 
visited his parents last Sunday. 

Guy Aylor, who has a position in 
Mr. Leidy's store, moved to Florence 
last week. 

N. C. Tanner and wife broke 
bread with N. A. Zimmerman and 
wife, last Sunday. 

Mrs. B. D. Clore, of Erlanger, 
spent a day recently with her sister, 
Mrs. B. A. Floyd. 

With best wishes and a happy and 
prosperous New Year to the Recor- 
der and all of its readers, I am yours 
for service. 

Mrs. Alice Daughters and daugh- 
ter, Miss Effic, of Cincinnati, spent 
the week-end with relatives in this 
neighborhood. 

The heaviest rain of the season 
fell here last Sunday night. The wa:- 
er courses were higher than they 
have been for several years. 

The regular annual business meet- 
ing at Hopeful which is supposed to 
meet on Jan. 6th, will convene on 
Monday the 7th, at 10 a. m. The 
sixth comes on Sunday. A full at- 
tendance af ths members is desired. 

Christmas passed off very quietly 
here and have nothing to report out 
<>l (he oidumry exeept w «i were km<l 
ly rtmtmbartd by our friend Philip 
Taliaferro and other friends witn 
the nasont greeting* foi which we 

are vejy thankful 



Carpenter and daughter, Ruth, Mrs, 
Jennie Powers, Dr. E. L. Glacken, 
Mrs. Cora Stephens, Mr. and Mrs. j ^otin°H 



Farm of forty-seven acres on He- 
bron pike tifar Limaburg, Ky; good 
house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings: electric lights; plpnfv of fruit 
and water. A bt-Hutlful home 
I. DUNSON. 
n2H R. V. D. Florence. K.v 

Hairs Catarrh 
Medicine dl^l, " 

rid your system of Catarrh or Deafness 
caused of Catarrh. 

Sotf by oVuggatfa for ftr 40 jmti 

F. J. CHENE Y &. CO., To ledo, Ohio 

FARM FOR RENT 

Farm of 135 acres will rent on. tiu 

shares, 1C cows, tobacco and eori 

nice new four room house 







Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Jan. 5th 

A Cracker Jack 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 

Friday Night, Jan. 4th 

CHILDREN 10c. :-: ADULTS 25c 
War Tax Included Will Begin promptly at 7:30 



w p r>i i »# j w « Biuuiiu, nice new iwir room an 

W E. Glacken Mr. and Mrs Elmer to good tenant Abo for wmU 
Gl acken and family. All left at-af t ^ Ajrp ly to 



late hour wishing them a ong 
happy life together. 



and 



McGLASSON, 

Hebron, Ky. 



school, 



Honor Roll of Mt. Zion 
ending the month of Dec: 
Scholarship— 

John Robert Tanner. 
Ben Tanner 
Robert Surface. 
Jack Ward. 
Frances Robinson. 
James Robert Glacken. 
Otwell Rankin. 
Gaddis Rust. 
Vera Henry. 
Emma Marksberry. 
Pauline Henry. 
Ruth Tanner. 
Anna Ruth Moore. 
Lena Mae Moore. 
Susan Dixon. 
Emil Bassett. 

Attendance— 

•James Robert Glacken. 
Otwell Rankin. 
Charles Tanner. 
Emil Bassett. 
Ruth Tanner. 
Pauline Henry. 
Anna Ruth Moore. 
Lena Mae Moore. 
Susan Dixon. 
Deportment and Noataeaa— 
Lena Mac Moore. 



Some people just naturally cuss 
the cold weather in order to keep In 
trim for cussing the hot weather 
when it comes along. 




Trappers friend 84 years. No lot 
too large— Nuf Sod. 

HRKRKKT KIRK. 

Burlington, Ky. 



NOTICE. 



I hsvn at my stables the Rood sad- 
dle bred stallion. Young Rill, 5910, 
A. 8. H. R.. property of the United 
States Government. Young Hill is 
a i-roven sire of high-class saddle 
colts, and will make the seasou of 
1H24 at the Erlanger Fair Grounds. 
Arrangements may lie made for 
breeding by applying to 

J. T. RAFFERTV, Loral Agt. 
Fair Grounds, Erlangot, Ky. 

tf-at PIioiih Krl. Ih6. 

FOR SALE 



An opportunity of a lifetime an 

Ralnlgh Heifers age 'i inos. to one 

year; registered and traimferrabU— 

price ttoO.tlO, or will aeM singly. 

S. H. KYLK AHONB. (Iraat, Ky 



\A/a 




Do your Christmas Sboppiug early and get rid of 
your worries. If you need something for the 

Hens. Young Men and Boys 

WE CAN HELP YOU. 

We have a wonderful line of Suits, Overcoats* 
Corduroy and Duck Coats, Wain Coats, Coat-Sweat- 
ers and Slipovers. 

If Quality and Price Interest You, 
We can please you. 



Selmar 

605 Madison Avenue, 



Wachs 

COVINGTON, KY. 




DO YOU TAKE THE RKCOKDKR ? * 

Read Our Advertisements and Profit 6v Them. 
Subscribe For The Recorder $1.60 per year 



■ ^",0, l^-JJaP'.WS' 



emax; 



BOONE COUN 






PACE 



KENTUCKY UOlNfiS 

Mow shall Kentucky be pulled out 

the mud? What is to be done to 

roy the designation of "detour 

se", which has been fastened on 
•he commonwealth because of its 
lack of highways and the condition 
♦f many that it does possess. 

This is perhaps the most impor- 
tant matter that is to be settled at 
the coming session of the Kentucky 
Legislature. It involves a bond issue 
of 150,000,000, and this issue haa 
been coupled with the plan to pro- 
Tide additional millions for Ken- 
tucky schools and institutions. The 
combination project is one that ap- 
peals to the imagination »f those 
who wish to sea a greater Kentucky, 
one with roads, schools and a uni- 
versity worthy of the state's name 
arid fame, but haw it will impress 
the Tatars of the commonwealth, 
whan they ga ta Tote on it with taxes 
ia their inda, is a phaae af theprob- 
len that must be considered by the 
Legislators. 

The road bond proposition will re- 
solve itself into a question, wherev- 
er it is debated, either in the assem- 
bly halls, or when it is submitted to 
the people, of whether or not the 
roads shall be built on a plan of im- 
mediate payment through the bond* 
ar on a "pay-as-you-go plan" from 
the revenues derived for the roads 
from the sources that have been des- 
ignated for them. 

The primary system of state high- 
ways, which it >s proposed to com- 
plete by the bond issue, was estab- 
liahed by the legi slature in 192 0. It 
contemplates 1,000 miles of road. 
Part has been completed, but $50,- 
099,000 is required to perfect the 
system. The advocates of the bonJ 
issue are urging this course on the 
ground that it will permit completion 
of the state highway system in fiv± 
years. 

Those who favor the "pay-as-you- 
go" plan insist that the automobile 
licenses and gasoline tax can be in- 
creased slightly and made to bring 
the road revenue up to about $8,000,- 
••0 a year. This, they contend, will 
permit the state to build its roads 
in not more than two or three years 
more than with the bonds. When 
they are completed the state witl 
have its system free of debt. 

Opponents of the bond plan insist 
t^tat it will mean « certain increase 
ia taxes to pay the interest, and 
with a reduction in taxes being in- 
sisted upon this is a vital point. They 
dwell on the uncertainty of obtain- 
ing an indorsement of the bond is- 
sue from the voters at the polls. 

Another situation enters into the 
bond issue discussion since it has 
been Mecided to combine the road 
bands with bonds for the schools anJ 
institutions. The first proposition 
was to make a $7g,000,000 combina 
tion bond issue, but at the confer- 
ea«e conducted by Governor W. J. 
Fields with the Executive and Le- 
gal Committee of the Good Roads 
Association at which the Governor 
gave his approval of the plan, n> 
sunt was fixed. It was decided to 
include in the bond issue the $50,- 
000,000 for roads, an appropriate 
sum for county schools, funds for 
the University of Kentucky, money 
for the four normal schools, funds 
far the four penal and charitable in- 
stitutions in proper condition, money 
far negro schools, mney to pay the 
state's floating debt and a sum fo* 
a geological survey of the state. 

GoTernor Fields instructed the 
Gaad Roads Association to appoint 
committees to draft an act along the 
liaas indicated, covering the larger 
program. 



The ever increasing road traffic 
doubtless will call for many meas- 
ures at the session. One that is be- 
ing advocated would require trucks 
aaa ether slow moving vehicles to 
keep at the right side of the public 
highways at all times. 

A change in the vehicle license 
law that will force payment accord- 
iag to the quantity of use that is 
girea a car is oeing advocated, on 
the ground that it is unfair to make 
two cars of the same make pay the 
same license when one may be op- 
erated 20,000 miles in a given per- 
iod and the other only 2,000. A nam. 



education will, in my judgment, oc- 
cupy a very important' place in the 
next legislature and should be giv- 
en the most careful consideration by 
every member. It will not be my pur- 
pose to attempt *o dictate as to the 
best method of settling hese ques- 
tions but I will 'lo whatever I can in 
helping to fulfill every promise made 
to the people of Kentucky. It is my 
desire that the new administration 
have the support of every member <f 
the General Assembly and evary~ciU 
izen of Kentucky, Democrat or Re- 
publican, necessary to put our state 
government on a business like basis." 



TIMELY REMINDERS 

Frozen Milk — Delivering froze., 
milk to a creamery is a losing prop- 
osition. Whatever adheres to the can 
or cover, as well as all floating ice 
particles, constitute a clear loss. In 
their endeavor to prevent freezing, 
many dairymen make no effort t j 
cool the night's milk until the follow- 
ing morning. As a result, there is a 
continuous bacterial growth in the 
warm milk all night long, and the 
milk frequently is tainted badly. 



Corn Shrinkage — Corn stored in 
October or November will shrink in 
total weight the first year from 5 to 
20 per cent, depending on the ma- 
turity. The biggest shrinkage comes 
in the first month it is stored, with a 
considerable loss of weight again in 
April. Remember this fact in buying 
and selling corn. 



Farm Accounts — The new year 
will soon be here. January first is a 
gt>od time~to s tart k eepi n g accurate 
acounts that will show you which of 
your farming enterprises' are paying. 
Ask your County Agent for an ac- 
count book and find our for yourself 
whether yu are farming at a profit 
or a loss. 



Barn Ventilation — Are the walls 
of your barn covered with a coating 
of white frost in the morning? If so, 
it is an indication that the ventila- 
tion is poor. Pure air is just as im- 
portant to live stock as good food 
and water. Consult your County Agt. 
on proper barn ventilation. 



The Veterans of Foreign Wars of 
the United States, a secret and fra- 
ternal organization, which was 
founded in 1899, ami v.- hose mem- 
berahiu is limited to veterans who 
have served overseas in time of war 
in the Army, Navy or Marine Corps, 
has now a State Department, with 
Headquarters at Lexington, in the 
McClelland Building, and new Posts 
are being organized thruout Ken- 
tucky. Gen. Lloyd N. Brett of Wash- 
ington, D C, who retired from the 
army after forty years of service, 
and who holds a Congressional Med- 
al of Honor and several other decor- 
ations, is at present Commander-in- 
Chief. Col. T. L. Huston, who owns 
a one-half interest in the Yankee 
Base ball team and ball park, was 
the Cuiiimander-TrrCtrief during" "the 
term of i'J22 and W>2? The National 
Encampment was held in Seattle in 
1922, and in Norfolk this year. Next 
year it will be held in Atlantic City 
and Kentucky veterans plan to have 
it held in Louisville in 1925, which 
will bring about thirty thousand dele- 
gates to that city.* 

There are at present three strong 
Posts in Louisville, two in Lexing- 
ton, one at Corhin, iddlesboro and 
other cities and towns and it is the 
intention of the State- Department 
to organize one Post in every coun- 
ty in the State, as throughout the 
north and west the V. F. W., has the 
largest paid up membership of any- 
veteran organization in the United 
States. It is the only one that ad- 
mits to membership veterans of all 
wars in which the United States has 
been engaged. Ten veterans who 
served overseas in the World's War, 
the Spanish-American War or Phil- 
ippine Insurrection can sign an ap- 
plication for a charter and secure a 
Post for their county. 

All veterans of this county inter- 
ested should communicate at once 
with R. E. L. Murphy. State Com- 
mander, Veterans of Foreign Wars, 
Lexington, Ky. 



ANOTHEK CENT AD- : 
DED TO POOL ADVANCES 

Re-opening of Receiving Plants Pott 
poned to January 7th Became 
of Wat Weather— Check. 
To Ba Sent Growers 
Who Have Deliv- 
ered. 

Because of the continued wet [ 
weather and the soft order of tobac- 
CO as a result, the Burley Tobacco j 
Growers' Co-operative Association 
has announced the postponement of ' 
theN re-opening of the receiving i 
plants from December 31, the dat • 
decided on at the closing for the hoi- ' 
idays, to January 7th at the same j 
time a new schedule of advances to ' 
growers, increased one cent a pouni . 
on each grade above the advances ! 
previously determined upon, except 
on the N. G. grade, was announced-, 
Growers who already have delivered 
will receive checks for this increase 
as soon as the checks can be issued. 
Twenty thousand growers Have d^- , 
livered their cron, Secretary H. Lee 
Earley reports. | 

The postponement was determined 
upon as a move in the Interest of the 
growers as a whole, as the soft ord >: 
of the tobacco m hand renders it 
liable to damage and consequent loss 
to the growers President James '". 
Stone, in making the announcement 
said : 

"We have decided to postpone re- 
ceiving tobacco after the holiday., 
-until January 7th on account of th" 
continued wet weather and the soft 
order of tobacco. We have received 
a great deal of tobacco and unless 
attention is given it in its presenrt 
condition it mav be damaged and 
the growers suffer as a consequence. 
The receiving plants of the associa- 
tion, therefore, will be closed for 
another week, which will give time 
properly to Iook after the tobaco 
received and protect it from possible 
injury due to weather conditions." 



UNK>N. 

Andy Holtzworth has a new Ford 

COUpc. 

Prof. W. P. Gullet t spent the holi- 
days at his home. 

Mrs. Belle Jones spent Surd-.-- 
with Mrs. Fannye Utz. 

Mrs. Ada Bachelor i isited her 
mother at Erlanger, last week. 

Mrs. Grace Pope and children call- j 
ed on Mrs. Anderson .'.unday after- 
noon, i 

Misses Hazel and Helen SeTWCI , 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 

l.enrie Eddins has been q>>it-'' ;ll 
for several days. r 

Edward Rice was taken suddenly 
!ii ... f Satui' ay afternoon. 

J. L. K..? had a fine Jersey milt h 
cow to die Kit Saturday night. 

Leonard Hewett, of Cleves, Ohio, 
was a visitor to Burli.igton, Monday. 

fhe merchants of Burrmgton nil 



spent the week-end with Dr. and Mr3. report a splendid business dt ing the 
O. E. Senour. j holidays. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Baker anJ ! Geo ^^ Jnd mle gon> of Con . 
Jesse Kelly spent New Year's day at bU were visitors to Burlington 

Leslie Sullivan's. Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Felthaus of 
Erlanger, spent the week-end with Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Davrainvil:- 
relatives at Union. have moved to their residence we:u 

Mrs. J. B. Dickerson visited with^f town. 



her sister, Mrs. J. R. Williams sev- 
eral days last week. 

Circle No. 2 of the W. M. S. will 
meet with Miss Eugenia Riley Thurs- 
day afternoon, Jan. 10th. 

Miss Anna Mae Bristow visited in 
Covington with her cousin, Mrs. Ben 
Mosley, several days last week. 

Mrs. J. T. Bristow entertained i^i 
Sunday Miss Eugenia Riley, DoretW^din 
and Ralph Barlow and Wm. Town 

,-MiM Edna Barlow and Volney 
Dickerson were quietly married la-;t 
Thursday evening at the Baptist 
parsonage by Rev. Garber. 



J. O. Bonta and wife entertained 
Sunday, a number of relatives from 
Cincinnati. 

Born, to Howard Huey and wife, 
of near Petersburg, on the 28th of 
December, a girl. 

Elmer Kelly and wife entertnired 
ite a number of their relatives at 
ner, last Sunday. 

Dr. Duncan, wife and daughter L: 



fiici'ds in Burlington. 

L. C. Scothorn, the Idlewild mer- 
chant, was among 



visitors to 



Mr. Lynn Frazier entertained Sun- I'urlingtoo, Monuday. 



day Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Bristow, M . 
and Mrs. Ben Mosley, Mrs. B. L. 
Norman, Miss Lillian Bristow and 
Mr. L. H. Voshell. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Garrison, Mrs. 
Nannie Conrad, Mrs. S. C. Hicks, 
Mrs. W. M. Rachal, Jr., Miss Lillian 
Bristow and Mr. J. L. Frazier were 
guests of Mrs. Ben Norman one day 
last week. 

Miss Eva Smith had as guests last 
Friday Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Utz, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ezra Blankenbeker, M«. . 
and Mrs. Ben Riley, Mr. and Mrs. 
Geo. Barlow and Mrs. Voleny Dick- 
erson. 



LEGUME <?ROPS DEVELOPED 

BY NATURAL LIMESTONE 

Usv of its natural limestone re- ! 
sources has greatly assisted St. 
Charles, County, Mo., in developing 
ft* legume crops from a very-small 
acreage to over 't0t<l#<' —res of clov- 
ei, 1,000 acres of> alfalfa and e**-"» 
sive plantings of soy beans and cow 
peas in 1923 according to reports 
to the United States Department of 
Agriculture, hese are especially im- 
portant crops to St. Charles fanners 
as dairying is one of their principal 
industries. No limestone was being 
used in the county and practically 
no clover or alfilfa grown when ex- 
U n-ion work wis begun there in 
1018. That year the agricultural ex- 
tension agent secured the coopcr-t-. 
tion of about 40 farmers in using! 
lime on acid soil as u preparation for ' 
growing legumes. 

Successful demonstrations of the 
benefits of lime have „. greased eadi | 
year and community limestone crush- 
era for utilizing local limestone Save] 
been installed to supply the lime. 
In three year's time, four crushers • 
had been established and this year 
11 have been in use Since 1920 ov- ' 
IT .5,000 tons of lime have been us.'d 
in the county annually and up to I 
September 1 of this year 3,000 tors, 
have been applied, providing for .i l 
considerable increase in the legume | 
acreage. 



RABBIT HASH. 

A heavy rain fell here Sunday 
night. 

Mrs. Handy Ryle and family 
spent Sunday at Roy Ryle's. 

Lewis Craig and family spent 
Is inc. day at S.J. Stunners'. 

Whooping cough arni chicken pox 
■um onioVinjcs i>? »hjiJ neighborhood. 

W-J are j^ lad to hear that Martin 
Williamson is able to be out again. 

Several tobacco growers have de- 
livered their tobacco and received 
g< od prices. 

Christmas is over and the, children 
ar? very sorry to think that school 
begins again. 

Mrs. Annie Ryle entertained th.- 
yWng folks with a dance and party 
Saturday night. 

Mrs. John Ryle is entertaining h- r 
ni.thcr. Mrs. Mamie Stephens, of 
K:sa>j- Sun, Ind. 

Hube rt Clore and family spe.it I>lof - Stott :il ■■♦upper during the hoi- 
Sit uj day it Mrs. Clore's father's Mr ! 'days. 



J. ■('. Conrad, of Florence, sold his 
farm to a Covington man. one day 
last v. fk, for 1 19,000. 

Se far as we have h ea rd , e v e ry - 
body in and around Burlington, had 
an enjoyable Christmas. 

The County Clerk was kept busy 
i&st Saturday afternoon issuing li- 
cense to automobile owners. 

Rufus W. Tanner, the auto repair 
man, of Florence, was a business vis- 
itor to Burlington, Monday. 

To really cultivate your own brain. 
keep in touch with those who have- 
more brains than you have. 

If 1923 was a good year for you 
you should not be satisfied until you 
have made 1 924 a better one. 

Out of about thirteen hundre 1 
nogs listed, only about fifty have se- 
tt it d licenses by th'-ir owners. 

Last Sunday being the fifth Stir 
day there was no pic-aching at eith 
ar ihe Methodist or Baptist church"*. 

There ha no? beer much doing n 
the way of real estate deals in th-s 
pan M the country for 'some time. 

-T < >h ii Elslager and wife, of Cin- 
cinnati* spent the Christmas holidays 
w.a her mother, Mrs. Rebecca Utz. 

Wallace Rice, of Idlewild rVeigh- 

horhood, spent Sunday with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs Edward Kice her . 

W. R. Davrainville and wife c- 
tertained Rev. W. W. Adams ami 



I N THE PUBL I C EYE 



U. S. TAKES STEPS TO ASSURE 

ITS BINDER-TIWNE SUPPLY. 

In recent years the United States 
Department of Agriculture has been 
giving considerable attention to the 
problem of an adequate supply of 
binder-twine fiber for the future, 
particular attention being given to 
the study of plants which can be 
grown in the insular possessions of 
the United States. The Philippines 
are looked upon as the principal 
BOttrce of binder-twine fiber in our 
insular possessions, although some 
henequen and sisal may be produced 
in Porto Rico and the Virgin Islands. 
The department has been doing co- 
operative work with the Philippine 
bureau of agriculture on sisal and 



and Mrt. L. L." Stephens. 

Mi'f Elizabeth Cook. Lou Wi' ; - 
iamson and Wm. and Clifton Steph- 
ens visited Mr. and Mrs. Lavino 
Stephens, Saturday night and Sir - 
day. 

Irene Scott. Wilma Scott, Ruth 
C. rlyle Harry Carlyle, Raymoi. 1 
.-\eia, Paul Acta and Wither Ac- 1 
i ent a few hours with Helen Clor >, 
Sunday evening. ' 

Hubert Ryk and wife, Filmore 
Ryle and wife, Willie Stephens and 
wife and CJatt-nce Ryle and wife -ill 
dti ed with Mr. and Mrs. L. L. Steph- 
< ' • Christmas day. 

Mrs. Harry Acra, Mr. and Mis. 
Thadie Ryle and daughter, Raymond 
Acra, Paul Acra, Willie Acra Irene 
a»'d Wilma Scott and Helen Clor,-, 
spent Thursday at Robt. Kite's at 
Barksworks, Ind. 



maguuy and abaca hemp. Accbrding 
to the department, it is entirely pos 
sible that the ultimate solution of 
our binder-twine fiber problem will 
be an increasing substitution of 
nbaca for henequen in the manufac- 
ture of binder twine. During the 
past year large quantities of this 
fiber have been used for the purpose, 
but if this fiber is to be produced as 
cheaply in the Phiippines as hene 
quen is produced in Yucatan im- 
provements must be made in the 
abaca industry. 



WATERLOO 

Mrs. Gus Ryle spent several days 
last week with her children. 

Miss Madelene Kelly spent sever '1 
davs last week with Mrs. Elmer Jar- 
rell. 

We are very gh"i lo hear tint 
Liijah Per.dry is better at this writ- 
ing. 

Miss Edna and Erma Feely speut 



B. ",'. Campbell and. wife and .. 
lady friend of Walnut Hills, Qhin, 
were visitors to Burlington, last 
Saturday. 

To our subscribers, advertisers 
and correspondents and everybody 

else We wish a happy and prosperous 
New Year. 

B. E. Aylor expects to build, in thj 
spring, •' rive room bungalow on hi- 
baby farm adjoining the new Par': 
Addition just north of town. 

Clifton Roberts, Waller Blown 
and Jerry Fowler, of Covington, 
spent Saturday night and Sunday 
with relatives in Burlington. 

Albert Schwybold, one of our 
good.friends of Florence, was a vis- 
itor to the county .seat Monday. He 
made this office a pieasant call. 

Miss Euuie Willis, who is a nurse 
at ti'e Good Samaritan Hospital, Cin- 
cinnati, spert the Christmas holida\s 
i with her mother, Mrs. Eunie Willis. 

This part of the country was vis- 
ited by another heavy rain last Sun- 
day night, accompanied by loud 
peals of thunder and vivid Iightni'U'. 

Mi'ton Souther aiid wife, of near 
Idlewild, and Mr. and Mrs. Charle? 



Sundav with Mr. and — Mrs: — Jake 
Fleek. 

Miss Betilah Kelly spent Wednes- 
day night and Thursday with Miss 
l.illie Louden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Cook enter- 
tained the young folks with a dance 
Wednesday nite. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kite had as 
their guests Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Hood 
and family Sunday. 

Miss Nellie Lawrence of Lexington 
spent several days lust week with 
Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Kite. 

Mr. and Mrs. Emmett Louden an I 
little son Emmett I^ee, Jr., spent sev- 
eral days with Mr. and Mrs. Leomer 
Louden. 

Mr. and Mrs. Saui Pope sou and 
daughter, and Mrs. Chas. L. Kelly, 
spent one day last week with M r. 
and Mrs. Ezra Aylor. 

VERONA." 

By reading three chapters, six 
days in the week and the on Sum- 
dny, the Bible can be read through in 
a year. Glad to have you unite 
with us, m reading it through this 
year, reading one chapter each da> 
in the New Testament. 

J. l>. Hudson, Verona Ky. 

If you could convert our bun-bull 
teams into n standing unny congress 
would not ht-Hitutv to vote scads of 
funds (or prvpurMrrdnrsa. • 



St ■] hens, of near Bullittsulh. 1 , wer ■ 
Sunday guests of Mrs. Lorena Crop- 
per 

Mrs. C. C. Roberts, of Covington, 
spent from Saturday evening unt 1 
Tuesday with her brother and sisters, 
W. R. Rogers and Misses Sallie and 
Tlizabeth Rogers. 

P. 1 . Neal, of the Hathaway neigh- 
borhood, will ha\e a sale of personal 
property at his residence on Janu 
ary 12th. See adv. in another col 
unm in this issue. 

. Mrs. J. H. Jockey entertained th.- 
children of the Methodist Sunday 
schoolat her home "Breezy Bluff,"' 
last Saturday night. A delightful 
time inras enjoyed. 

Mrs. J. H. Dinn and little daugh 
ter, Jessie Lee, of Hebron neighbor- 
hood, were visitors to Burlington, 
last Monday, and made the Recorder 
office a pleasant call. 

Members of the Farmers Union 
Ironi different purts of the county, 
held a meeting in the court house, 
la.> I Suturday afternoo.ii at tfhicb 

bus i n ess of Importance was tron« 

•tied. 

In spite of the iucleimitts weath 
er, a large crowd utended the se'< 
of ihv pergonal and real property f 
th* lata B. R. Stephens ut Uubb.. 
I'li-h, on the 2 1 * k ... «>,-, v 

tl i g sold for good p rites 



FLORENCE. 

Mis- Dorothy Flagle, of Cineinna- 
: , is visiting Mrs. Albert Fisk. 

lute Bradford wife and son spent 
Wednesday at Owen Bradford's. 

Mrs. Carl Swim spent a few d 
last week with friends in Cynthiar.a- 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hampton sj.er.t 
Xmas day with friends in Falmouth^ 

Mrs. Lizzie Bartell is visiting: her- 
brother, John Tanne' and wif--. eC 
Gunpowder. 

Henry Clore wife and niece, oC 
Alabama, spent Friday with WiUim 
C'ant and w'.fe. 

Geo. Swim and wife and Carte 
Swim, srent Wednesday with Mr. an* 
M''s. John Swim. 

Mrs. ('has. Craven and daugl/er- 
Nelta, spent Monday with Mrs. Ardfc 
Lucas and daughter. 

Miss Flora Mae Pei>h;im was th& 
g.iest last week everj night, with hec- 
c.).:.-n Mrs. Ora Lalle. 

Fitzhugh Tanner and wife sp^nt 
Xmas day with hoi father, Mr. Geo.. 
Stephenson, of Union. 

Mr. and Mrs. Llewellen Aylor of 
Burlingti.n pike, entertained several 
friends at dinner Suf .ay. 

Mrs. Guy Collins, of Crittenden, 
is visiting her son William and wife, 
and Mrs. Will Goodridgo. 

Mrs. Bradley Bayre and Ewo chil- 
dren of Covington, spent Friday witfc. 
her aunt, Mrs. Ed. Sydnor. 

Miss Lucille Wilson of Union, 
-pent the latter part of the week.- ' 
guest of Mrs. Owen Bradford. 

Mrs. Ed. Pane, of Co\ ingtoTi, wax 
calling on Mrs. Will Busby and Mrs. 
.V b'-rt Lucas Saturday night, 

Mrs. J. H. Garber and two littlc- 
iatv.'htei-, o r I'nio:-, -i>rr»l Saltrday- 
afternoon with Mrs. Ed. Sydnor. 

Mr. and M s. C, W. Myers enter- 
tained Xmas day !. K. .hompson and 1 . 
v if<\ and J. P. Crouch and wife. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Sydnor and Miss. 
Anna Carlton spent Xmas day with 
Sam Sydnor and wife, of Covington., 

Charles Clarkson and wife enter— , 
tained his brother John and wife, of 
Covington, at his home on Burling- 
ton pike. 

Chas. Popham wife and two daugh- 
ters, spent Wednesday with Elbert: 
Drinkenburg and wife on Burling- 
ton pike. 

Quite a large crowd attended the 
I 0. 0. F. supper Wednesday evening 
and quite a nice little sum of money- 
was realized 

Emw*^ Baxter and- «f--v:!y, of 
Reading, Ohio, and Rev. Elmer Lo- 
cas, of Bellevue, spent Xmas dajr 
with Mr. and Mrs. Arch Lucas. 

Miss Minnie „Ryle and mother, of 
Shelhy-st., entertained Bert Scott; 
:.T.<; wife and son, of Waterloo, and 
Miss Myrtie Stephens, Sunday. 

Mrs. C. W. Myers entertained the> 
Woman- Missionary Society of thes- 
Baptist church at herhome" last 
Thursday. Quite a crowd was pres- 
ent. 

The members of the Christian 
church entertained their pastor. Rev. 
! an and wife, after srvices Sun- 

day afternoon, with, a chicken din- 
ner. 

Chas. Tanner wife and family m<£ 
ReV. C. C. Tanner wife and son, 
Charles Wintield. of Petersburg, 
spent Christmas day with Mrs. Lucjr 
Tanner. 

School opened Jari, 2nd. The boys- 
and girls have enjoyed quite a long 
vacation, but the beM ?oon will be- 
heard 1 again tailing tnem all to come) 
to work. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur McDu'fy, of 
Paris, pass* d through here Saturday 
to spend the holidays with her par- 
ents. Angus Tanner and wife, of Pt. 
Pleasant. 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Fisk enter- 
tained one day last week Frank Kirk- 
patrick wife and daughter Miss Vir- 
ginia, of Covington, and son Alberts 
of New York. 

Albert Busby and wife entertained! 
Sunday at their home on Shelby-st^. 
Mr. and Mrs. Will Busby, Misses; 
Florence and Ethel Marquis and Miss; 
Arch Marie Lucas. 

There will be a patriotic service 
held at the Florence Christian church. 
Sunday Jan. 6th, 1924, at 2:15 p. 
m. Rev. H. C. Runyan will preachu. 
You are invited to attend. 

Mr. and Mrs. Leslie' SorreH enter- 
tained Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
Anderson, Carl Anderson wife and 
daughter, and Mr and Mrs. Eli jah 



iaal license fee is urged, with an in- 
crease in the gasoline tax, which 
woeid cause payment according to 
ike aae given the car, gasoline being 
a tree Index. 



Miss Margaret Leahy, known as 
the most beautiful girl in Britain, 
was chosen from 80,000 contestants. 



Ifee plight of 'he taxpayer seems 
certain to receive sympathetic atten- 
dee at the session. Among the ex- 
pressions of a desire to do some- 
thing for this unfortunate individual 
ia that this unfortunate individual is 
that of Senator Henry S. McElroy, 
of the Fourteenth Dstrict, who says: 
"While we all seem united in the 
leaire for better schools and better 
roads, I trust we may have the same 
united desire to work out a progru n 
that will relieve the unhappy condi- 
tion of the burdened taxpayer, for 
without relief to him neither the 
caaae of good roads nor of good 
schools will meet with much enthus- 
iasm on his part. With him economy 
in the administration of the State's 
affairs and lightened and equalized 
burdens of taxation is a consumma- 
tion devoutly to be wished. 



Lady Aberdeen has accepted the 
Chairmanship of an all-woman pub- 
lishing firm, which has been organiz- 
ed in England for the purpose of 
publishing books and periodicals of 
particular interest to women. 



In wearing a beard, which now is 
regarded as much out of fashion, 
King George is but following the 
example of his father, the late Ed- 
ward VII., who was the first British 
sovereign to wear a beard for nearly 
300 years. ' " 



Samuel W. Adams, of Covington, 
who ia considered certain of election 
as Speaker of the House, has given 
ao expression as to what should 
guide the Legislature in its dtliber 
ations. Mr. Adams says "The ques- 
tions of taxation, good roads and 



Forsaking a lucrative medical prac- 
tice in New York City, Dr. Helen G. 
Gibson now is on her way to India, 
where she plans to become a mis- 
sionary teacher. Dr. Gibson's decis- 
ion to engage in missionary work 
was made suddenly while she was at- 
tending a conference of women phy- 
sicians a few weeks ago at Atlantic 
City, in the course of which one of 
the speakers referred to the urgent 
need of capable teachers in India. 

A brother editor says that "our 
sins may not find us out, but our 
neighbors will." Speaking from ex- 
perience, wt present*. 



NOTICE 

All persons are hereby notified *o 
secure their auto and dog licenses 
bwfere^^HH'ftry 10th. After that date 
I will be compelled to enforce the 
iaw against nil delinquents. 

B. B. HUME, 
Sheriff Boone Countv. 



At a meeting of Hebron Lodge No. 
761. F. & A. M., Inst Thursday night 
the following officers were elected 
for the ensuing year: C. W. Riley, 
W. M., H. W. Rouse, Senior Warden, 
S. M. Graves, Junior Warden, W. B. 
Graves, Secty., ManliuM Goodridge, 
Trees., W. W. Goodridgo, Sen. Dea 
con, H. L. McGlasson, Junior Dea 
con, and R. T. MrGlasson, Tyler. 

Old Santa didn't stay long, but he 
did a lot ot goou a win 



I Stephens and family, of near Bur- 
lington. \ 

W. E. Busby and wife of the Bur- 
lingfon pike, entertained on Christ- 
mas day Albert Lucas wife and twe> 
daughters, -Jessie and Alice Sayre- 
Lucas, and Misses Ethel and Flor- 
ence Marquis. 

Several from here and near wer» 
present at the Sunday school enter- 
tainment Xmas eve., at the Baptist 
church, .which was good. The chil- 
dren performed their part in an e«- 
.ellent manner. 

y'lorv than half at ihe children of 
chool age in Ciha do not receive 
any sdwe ation at »H, nreord i n g to at 
lesaage from the President of the 
rl public to the Congress. It is esti- 
mated that more than 1 l'000 ne<r 
lassroom? are neded to provide- 
' laces for these children. Many own- 
is of buildings have o ered free* 
lassioom space to Boards of educsv- 
lon .uid additional classes will tie? 
installed M early as possible. By the- 
provisions of a law passed in July, 
litSS, it la now possible to reined j ia» 
Hurt the great shortage of teurhersv 
«huh hus been one of the greatest. 
problems in Cuban education. 

Frank Davrainville and wife, f 
Newport, were guesta of W. R. laarv 
BMati '-• ma4 futmly, fanf Sunday e*~ 

suing, 



" 



UMaaiu i 11... .mmmmmtmmmm 



•AGE EIGHT 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



TOMORROW IS NOT YOURS i RESTRICT IMMIGRATION 

Tomorrow is not yours. 'I'hi' 1'u- , 

ture does not belong to you. 

Man has the crumbling moment 

in which to dream or do and the re- 
cord of a year is only the aggregate 

of all of them. 

There is none worthy of the name 

of inn who does not wish to make a 

better word in the yea r whose gat e 

way has just luenpassed than He 

did : :\ Ifce one which ended when the 

dock struck twelve. 

No woman but wishes to achieve 

more; in the majority of instances 

not in her own person-but in that 

of a husband or one who may be- 
come her husband, or of a son or a 

brother or a father. 

Business success may be the goal 

in view, but wheuier the gain sought 
be material advantage, or if it be 
moral growth or spiritual enrich- 
melnt — whether it be the gathering 
together in barns or laying up in 
heaven — the task of today must be 
done today: it cannot be done to- 
morrow. 

Opportunity is of the moment, not 
of the future, it is the duty immed- 
iately at hand no matter how hum- 
ble. Opportunity is not the myster- 
ious opening of a hitherto concealed 
door, but is the thing that needs to 
be done now, the doing of which 
is progress. 

More men fail of success because 
of neglect of the duty which con- 
fronts them than for any other rea- 
son. The task is esteemed beneath 
their talent; too mean with which to 
soil the hands; or the good to come 
from it is not deemed sufficient re- 
compense for the effort. Thus one 
opportunity after another is neg- 
lected. 

Dreams of large tasks with larger 
rewards take the place of strength- 
ening performance, and when the re- 
cord of another year is made up it is 
as unsubstantial as the preceding one 
— or less so, for as purpose weakens 
from day to day from lack of ex- 
ercise, so it does from year to year. 
The man who would crown his 
life with success must strive earnest 
ly. Each day must be the epitome 
of a life of effort, and each hour 
and moment the epitome of the day. 
He can build for the future only 
with todays material. He cannot use 
it when it- has become yestwrJ.,.., :'<. 
fui then it will have departed from 
him. He must "act, act in the liv- 
ing present." — TheTe* is no other 
time for it. 

The man who would do better in 
the coming year than in the last one 
must begin today and do what is be- 
fore him as though it were the last 
work of his life and he had but this 
day in which to do it. He must do 
his .best with it, for only by doin.u 
eachT*skwell is perfection reached 

or appro ximJrtetL If each day's work I of a certain family of her relatives 
is done in this wa>Kand in this spirit j living in one of the larger cities, 
the record of the year will be sat- j who years ago were contemptuous of 

country towns. These cousins used to 
come out to visit this lady in her 



One of the most important meas- 
ures to he decided by Congress be- 
fore June next, is that restricting 
immigration. It is the most im- 
portant question before America to- 
day. Debts can be paid, even though 
a generation must be starved to do 
it; frontiers can be corrected, even 
though ars must be fought for the 
purpose; but the racial composition 
of a given country and the complica- 
tions arising therefrom are there for 
all time. 

The two most important consid- 
erations are first, the well-founded 
belief that an immigrant population 
does not so much augment as re- 
place an existing population where 
the incoming type has a lower stand- 
ard of living. The birth rate of na- 
tive Americans has fallen steadily in 
those portions of the country where 
immigrants are most numerous, and 
immigrants have replaced native 
American workmen. 

The second consideration is a pop 
ular belief that the population in a 
country like the United States can 
expand indefinitely. This is true up 
to the limit of food supply at a giv- 
en state of development. Based on 
past experience the population of 
the United States will be 200,000,- 
000 within the next "hundred years. 

There are now some 35,000,000 
foreign born and their children in 
this country, nearly 8,000,000 of 
whom have taken no steps to become 
a part and parcel of the American 
people, and several millions of oLhers 
who belong to that class designat- 
ed rry General Pershing — as" those 
who "attempt to decide American 
questions for a foreign reasons." 

In this country are printed some 
1,200 newspapers and periodicals in 
12 different languages, with a tre- 
menduous combined circulation. 

Our work of assimilation will not 
be complete until these conditions are 
remedied. The' man who attempts to 
shape American questions to foreign 
standards, and to settle them upon 
the basis of beneficial results to some 
foreign country, cannot be a good 
American citizen. 

Whoever comes from abroad to de- 
grade the American level of intelli- 
gence of physical, mental or moral 
life degrades every honest, natura- 
U7fri /^iti-ron % n d every native born 
citizen as well. 

Secretary of Labor Davis insists 
that every immigrant should be ex- 
amined at the port of embarkation, 
and the Commission of Immigration 
insists that steamship companies 
must be curbed in their reckless dis- 
regard of law. 



DESPISING THE COUNTRY 



A lady was speaking the other day 



isfying — perhaps better than satisfy- 
ing, an incentive to higher things in 
the one to follow. 



SOLDIERS BONUS AND TAXES. 

Notwithstanding the attitude of 
leading Democratic journals, the 
leaders of that party have pledge! 
the party repi-esep tap v^t .;» con- 
gress to support a solder's bonus hil, 
as against Mr. Mellon's insistent 
warning that taxes cannot be re- 
duced if the bonus bill becomes a 
law. 

Democratic statisticians and lead 
ers have produced estimates to show 
that Mr. Mellon's plan of tax re- 
duction really means a reduction for 
those best able to pay a tax, and in- 
dications now point to a measure 
that will relieve the small salaried 
and business man, and perhaps in- 
crease the surtax, or restore the sur- 
plus profits tax to help pay the bonus. 
It is held that the marvelous increase 
in dividends, extra dividends and 
stock dividends during the past year 
among- industrial corporations, to- 
gether with the fact that most of 
these dividends are invested in tax- 
exempt bonds, indicates that the 
present surtax cannot be held as a 
burden on b t isin e s B i 

Mr. M lions asserts that the bonus 
will require an average of 1225,000°, 
^00 per year during the first four 



years, and a total in the long run of 
about $5,000,000,0000. Several Con- 
gressmen and Senators pro pose tfl 
insist on some of the foreign nations 
paying their debts, the interest oi 
which will pay this bonus. 

Congress has adjourned until .Jan- 
uary •'!. Meanwhile the various "in- 
terests" will bring every pressure to 
bear to force their desires to the 
f'ont. 



country home, and theyt:;! a super- 
cilious air in regard to her surround- 
ings: They made fun of the villagers, 
and appeared to feel that people who 
lived in country towns were very 
much behind the times. They seemed 
to think that to keep in touch with 
modern life it was necessary to live 
in or near large centers. 

It is an interesting fact that of 
the younger members of this family, 
one has just married a country girl, 
and another is about to do so. This 
shows the changed point of view. 

This change resulted after this 
family began to go out in the coun- 
try, first as summer visitors. Then 
they became attached to county 
scenes, and lived more or less of the 
time in country towns for a period 
of years. 

This closer contact with country 
life led them to alter their view of 
countrp people. They discovered the 
solid worth of fh* rural element^, 
their earnest depotion to work, their 
intelligence gained from much study 
and thought and discussion in clubs 
and other organizations. 

A lot of tfye. society people in cities 

(fritter time away in meaningless anJ 
aimless social life. Meanwhile the 
country folks are as a rule earnest, 

I induntrious, a n d anxious fur Sel f lm- 



provement. There are of course plen- 
ty of country people who are not 
progressiv e , and just spend their 
life in ruts. But the idea that peo- 
ple have to live in large cities to get 
in touch with modern life is entire- 
ly exploded, and the country towns 
ate just as wide awake today 
place and probably more 



as anv 



so. 



Th. 



CARRY A LANTERN 

The stinRy farmer was scoring 
the hired man for carrying a light- 
ed lantern to call on his best girl. 

"The idea," he exclaimed. "When 
I was courtin' I never carried 
lantern; I went in the dark.'' 

"Yes," said the hired man 
'•| nd look what you got." 



no 



sadly, 



Before going to war, the Germans 
drank toasts to "Der tag." The gen- 
eral opinion is that they ^ot tagged 
all right. 

Claimed the American boy has no 
power of concentration, but many of 
them seem able to concentrate their 
minds on their best girls. 

NOTICE 

The annual stockholder meeting 
and election of the Hebron Deposit 
B»~ "be held T-..J. _ January 
Uth, between 8 and 12 a. m. 

CHAS. RILEY, Cashier 



trend of design in radio ap- 
paratus is toward the furniture, and 
away from the box design, toward 
completely inclosing not only the 
mechanical and electrical parts of a 
radio receiving set, but the acces- 
sories, such a> batteries, wires, and 
loud -peak.-,, no that the whok «n4t 
can l,e self-contained rather than 
spread (Art over the tabl* 
SOUS DartS of the room. 

In the early days „f radio 

sockets, rheostats, condensers, coils 

and other parts were spread out over 
■ ,al ; 1 "- '"' »tt*cbed to ■ bread 
board. The next development was 
'he pane] idea, wherein the various 
parts were assembled 

panel. Later this 



or in var- 



the 



on a movable 
panel w* aslsntb. 
'•« in »' »>ox, bin in each Instance the 
batteries and other accessories were 
noi housed completely 
receiving ati 



within the 



'he nun have 

i>\\ It 

the) serv< 



oui.i ,,r the 

■ lien 

glorious Hup- 




COLONIAL HOUSE 

Many Unusual Features Found in 
This Design of Home. 



WOOD OR STUCCO EXTERIOR 



This Type Can Be Built on Wide or 

Narrow Lot — Curving Portico Over 

Entrance Qlvoo Pleasing 

Touch to th* w*>ele. 

By WILLIAM A. RADFORD 
Mr. William A. Radford will answer 
questions and five advice FREE Or 
COST on all subjects pertaining- to the 
subject of building-, for the readers of 
this paper. On account of his wide 
experience as Bdltor. Author and 
Manufacturer, he is. without doubt, 
the hiahest authority on all these sub- 
jects. Address all Inquiries to William 
A. Radford, No. 1827 Prairie avenue, 
Chicago, 111., and only inclose two-cem 
stamp for reply. 

The charm of the Dutch Colonial 
style of architecture Is undeniable, and 
while in this case some llhertles have 
heen taken with the accepted form of 
door and window treatment, the result 



? i n_ i 5 , "J — r !' H 

r-- ^>: - ' r - J!t--fcz ! j-z l | - rf^r" 1 - z\>z 4 - 



these serve are practically ns large as 
:1ioiitIi (lie walls had heen carried 
straight up. 

1 low nst airs the entrance lels us into 
the reception hall, with the staircase 
lending Itself to, decorative handling. 
iOie eau secure authentic Colonial 
staircases, fitted for the carpenter's 
pulling together, that permit a good 
choice of patterns, und one of these 
would make the reception hall a place 
o f re al d ls t l iK tlvn, with- oo unreason- 
able outlay. ,„., . 

To the right of the reception hall 
is the living room, with fireplace, and 
good blank wall spacing for the plac- 
ing of larger articles of furniture ef- 
fectively, and for the proper hanging 
of pictures. Off the living room is a 
small room which could be used for 
den, office, library or sewing room. 
There Is a downstairs lavatory adjoin- 
ing Its partition wall, and In the case 
of a large family a door could be 
opened into the lavatory ^rom the den, 
permitting the latter to serve as an 
extra bedroom. 

There is a rear entry, reached from 
the reception hall, through the house, 
and opening on a rear pergola porch. 
On the right side of the first floor the 
dining room and the kitchen are lo- 
cated, and we want you to note the 
fine, large pantry, with Its provision 
for work-table right under the win- 
dow, which will save the housewife 
many steps. 

Upstairs we have three bedrooms and 
a bath. One could urrange the par- 

D,N. 



ts% 



»K3 



:KX»KJC«iQ3KXSKXSRX8:! 

FORD BATTERIES 



Si 



S$15.50 

- Guaranteed One Year. 

Don't fail to give us a trial, for wc have won- 
ful values for your money in all size batteries. 

Recharge Battery Repair 








^DlNl 



Dining Rm 



Porch 




ft 



Dempsey Motor Car Co., 

ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

Phone Erl. 70-L 



KC»Kr=2R305KJtKXSKXXX55&a 



C. Scott Chambers 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

OF 

SERVICE, TENDERNESS 
AND ALERTNESS. 



s-W« 



First Floor Plan. 



'!■ 



Printed 

5tatiopery 

AT THIS OFFICE 



for business people. 

for professional people, 
tor farmers. 

for every one who wants 
to be considered up to 
date and going strong 

ENVELOPES, LETTERHEADS, NOIEHEADS, STATEMENTS 

— — , mmtm 




Second Floor Plan. 



Is not disastrous to the stood effect of 
the whole, us well might have hap- 
pened without Intelligent diRcrimlnn- 
tlon on the pert of the designer. The 
curving portico over the entrance 
helps to Justify an architectural 
dandling which might otherwise be 
questioned on the score of fitness, and 
gives a pleasing modern touch to the 
whole. 

Observe bow this style of architec- 
ture sdapts Itself to the varying slxe 
of lots. You could use the Dutch Co- 
lonial style la the wide lot site abown ; 
or It could be used on a narrow lot, 
u ud letting the narrow face the atreet. 

The exterior Is stucco; wood siding 
could be used, If desired. The finish 
should be preferably white. Red cedar 
shingles or prepared shingles or roof- 
ing, In any of the popular stains and 
colors, would make a comhlned ex- 
terior effect very pleasing. 

Observe how th« design while less 
ealng the < utile footage of the house, 
still lends Itself to ample apaclng for 
the second floor rooms. We get s dor 
raer srrangemeni of windows for the 
nl etoey, but the roams which 



titlon walls to get four bedrooms on 
the second floor, If desired. 

A louvred wlndou helps ventltaiw 
the attic, and keeps the house cooler 
in summer. 

A word about the Interior furnish- 
ing of thin house might be apropos; 
It should be In keeping with the sim- 
plicity of the design. One would not 
expect overstuffed, mssslvely designed 
or carved furniture In this dwelling, 
however much Its Dutch creators 
might hsve been Inclined thereto. No, 
we ought to confine ourselves to the 
simple, dignified American Colonial pat- 
terns, such as Windsor chairs, Salem 
type dialog furniture, and quiet, neu- 
tral timings for walls and drapes. 
Sheraton and Chippendale reproduc- 
tions would go well, also, as furniture 
for this home. After all, the simpler 
styles of furniture are better, and we 
grow to live more simply and dignified 
In the real neighborly way when our 
home la so furnished that It neither 
crestee enw in ihe hesrts of friends 
mining In our own clrrle, nor affronts 
those s nests wbo may be less wail 
favored «ltn ibis warld's goods. 



GAir 



Cincinnati Daily Enqui. 



/T 



AND— 



The Boone County Recorder 



YOU CAN GET 



both lor $5.00 theYEAB 

Send Your Subscriptions to the 

BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 

Burlington, Ky. 



ARE YOU A READKR OF THE 



RECORD! R? 



If Not Try It One year. 

gejTOo.Ct Ball to MS***) All Th» Ads In I hi* |«««js»,- 
,♦.♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦##♦♦♦♦♦♦#♦« »«MVMMwMMMIM|S)*M 



urn 



■LttA 



m^mmmmmk 



Vol. XXXXVI I I I 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Established 1875 BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY" 10, 1924 



.50 



i ei 



e&; 



No 12 



WASHINGTONJOMMENT. ! 

A great deal of caustic comment 
is printed regarding the proposed re- 
strictions of immigration, registra- | 
tiorj of aliens and the attempt to se I 
cur*i;ualii"» .-^::..r than quantity v f \ 
incomers from the old world. Their ' 
argfirments, boiled down, usually 
reaa "America should hold out .. 
welcome to all; the country is big 
enough for all; we are all sons and 
daughters of immigrants; immigrants 
made this country; we need immi- 
grants for labor; to restrict or reg- 
ister is Czaristic, not American." 

It is true we are all "sons and 
daughters" of immigrants; it is true 
that the immigrants we have had 
have done much to develop this coun- 
try. But as times change, so must 
methods. When we needed pioneers 
farmers, laborers, tillers of the soil, 
we received the best Europe had to 
oger. Not often does such an op- 
portunity come; a new country, a 
new freedom, land for the asking. 
Of course the yeomanry of Europe 
seized the chance and the land, came, 
went west, grow up with the country, 
helped make America, America. 

But today good land cannot be 
had for the asking. The pioneer days 
are over. American civilization has 
Krown complicated. It takes more 
than willing hands and a stout heart 
ti succeed here now. There must be 
a measure of education as well. 
Meanwhile, Europe is an impossible 
place for the diseased, the ignorant, 
the uneducated, the vicious, to live. 
The best equipped have none t >o 
easy a time; the worst quipped want 
to get out — out anywhere — but es- 
pecially "out to America." 

We still need, want and welcome 
good men and women, who can and 
ao become good Americans. But the 
time has passed when we can get 
them enly by opening wide the doo>\ 
The door must be shut, to keep out 
those ho hurt, not help, the nation, 
and only put a little ajar for that 
thinning stream of the best kind of 
men and women, who are able .0 
take advantage of the modern op- 
portunities of modern America, as 
their forebears were able to take 
advantage of the opportunities of 
American pioneer. 



THIS CHANGING COUNTRY 

The remark, is often made, thi ( 
this country is sure to go through a 
great change in ideas, owing to the 
change in character of the popula- 
tion. It is pointed out that a large 
part of the ~"« : ve Americans ha.v 
very small families, many having 
either only one child or none at all. 
Meanwhile recent immigrants wfu 
can't speak English and have not 
become Americanized, are apt to 
have families of five or six or more 
children. 

The result was seen at the army 
camps during the war, when about 
one fourth of the young men were 
more or less illiterate. 

Vet it has to be remembered thai 
many of the newcomers are so glad 
to get a free country and eager tc 
benefit by its advantages, that the- 
seem to enter into the spirit of the 
new world betterthan many of the 
old native stock. But the natives of 
this country must be very genorcmr 
to the newcomers and give them the 
chance to learn and adapt themsclv-s 
to their new surroundings which 
most of them eagncrly seek. 

COUNTRY OPPORTUNITIES 



OUTSIDE GROWERS 
GIVEN MORE TIME 

i 

Directors Leave Book Open Until ! 

'Furll^r Notice, After Learning 

That Bewteen 2,500 And 

3,000 Have Come In 

Since Re-opening 



EDUCATION IN LIMELIGHT 



Pr«jj»o*»- • •» Aboition of War, Re- 
moval of Unemployment. 

John Adams, professor in the Un- 
iversity of London, believes that ed- 
ucation .-done ca" eliminate the un- 
ei.idoymtnt problem so pressing i>i 
L'nglar.c: and which, periodically af- 
. fects the United States. He 'says: 

"Education must stress the devel- 
opment of intel'igerce, not more in- 
tellect. That is why we are suc- 
cessful in our new- beginning in vo- 
, oational education. Six trades allied 
to the rarpente- trade are taught the 
toy for two year:; then two trades 
least congenial U him are dropped. 
Gradual elimination and concentra- 
tion on one trade for the last two 
years really vts the boy not only for 
work with his hands but intelligence 
to go out and build business for him- 
self. 

"It is my earnest conviction that 
education will undergo a great 
change to meet our difficulties, and 
in doing so will bring a utility and a 
blearing to mankind unguessed at in 
our present procedure." 

Br. Augustus O. Thomas, Com- 
missioner of Education in Maine, and 
President of the World Federation 
of Education Associations, believe* 
that education alone can make wa- 
impossible. He says nf this idea 



Some young men rush off to thr. 
cities claiming there is no satisfac- '< 
tory business opportunity in io' 
country towns. If they are not in- 
terested in farming, they may say 
that the chances offered them ir. 
rural business are not big enough to 
satisfy them. , 

Young men who take that attitude 1 
must be ignorant of the fact that 
many men are making a large sue- I 
cess in country town enterprises to- j 
day. Many country stores by liberal 
advertising, have built up a trade 1 
j extending far beyood their owp town ' 
, and county. They draw automobile 
visitors from a radius of many mile-'. ! 
The country town store can de busi- j 
ness at less expense relatively than 1 
stores in large cities, hence it is in : 
a position to make low prices. If it ; 
will tell the public about those low j 
prices, it will find that it can draw ! 
a trade a ong distance. | 

TV young man who is anxious to ' 
si-.eeed in business should not light- 
ly imw over the chances offered in ! 
ruch enterprises. A good many men, 
after making a success in one store, 
have bought out others in the same 
line in other towns, and have bu ; lt 1 
up groups and chains of such enter- i 
Arises. 

Probably in the future there will | 
be more manufacturing in country 
districts than there has been in the | 
past. Labor costs are high in tho ! 
cities, owing to high cost of living 
conditions. Many firms have ma.lj 
a success oy clr.sing their city fac- I 
tones, and gcinr into some count -y 
district, where their help could live j 
less expensively, and hence be bet- 
ter off with ower wages than is paid ■ 
under the expensive conditions of 
large .\ry life. 

The young man who keeps his eyes 
wide open con find plenty of busi- 
ness oppoitun ties in :he rural dis- 
tricts. He must expect to work hard 
but he will have to do that anywhere 
to make good. 



Directors of the Burley Tobacc , 
Growers' Co-operative Association, 
in regular session at Lexington Jan- 
uary 2, adopted a resolution keeping 
the books of the Association opei 
for new members until further a - 
tion by the board, when they learn- 
ed that since the books were re-ope > - 
ed between 2,500 and 3,000 members 
had been added to the Association 
-bringing an average of an acre and 
a half of tobaeco each to the organ- 
ization. 

The field service reported Quit 
some good sized crops had been sign- 
ed up, one in Fayette county, of '10 ! 
acres, many others of five to ten J 
acres, but most of those who ha v.- ! 
joined the Association have signej 
up a: nyerags of an acre and a half 

j and the average throughout the .a.; 

I sociation is close to three acres to 



THE SERVICE OF THE COUNTRY 
TOWN 

In the social structure of our gr^at 
nation, the country towns are tne 
most- influential element and decid- 
ing factor. They are the very- 
foundation of its life. 

They perform certain services, 
quite as vital relatively as those 
which the heart performs for the 
human body. 

Some people have said that gre.t 
cities are the heart of a country. 
It would be more appropriate to call 
them the stomach, consuming some- 
thing produced somewhere else. The 
country towns are the heart or the 
origin fro which all energy proceeds. 
When the heart stops, the body stop*. 
So when the country towns sl,<p 
functioning properly, the country 
stops. This truth is not always ap- 
preciated. 

The country towns must lie ken: 
running efficiently, just as a man 
must see to it that his heart actio'.i 
'■ good. If there is a decline in 
country life, the whole nation mti.-t 
suffer. Rural Institutions must '.. 



MRS. EUGANIA DLYTDE. 

The citizens of Burlington warn 
grieved when the announcement woe 
made last Saturday morning, Jan. 5, 
1924, that the spirit of Mrs. Eugci.; 
Blythe had passed to the God who 
gave it. Her death occurred at bur 
home, the Boone Hotel, after beinj; 
confined to her bed for the past fot;t 
weeks with cancer of the stomacl , 
although she had been in falling 
health for the past two years or mo. • 
the was able to be up and about un- 
til about one month ago. 

She was born in Burlington F.-'i- 
ruary 21, lx.V>, and was one of «•!••■.- 
en children born to Edward am 1 



- r^"' "* ■ — "" J n "* — kUUt — I M B B i 

'With the spread of education, the 
fact that the people are able to ac 
cept the impact of the public press 
and understand and interpret ;t 
with a greater world consciousness 
makes it desirable and necessary 
that governments have a definite 
foreign policy which the people who 
make up the state and are themselves- 
the governing body must know. Pub- 
lic officials today must take the pe >- 
pie into their confidence in every- 
thing but those things that are fo.- 
the time being not for other nations 
to Jcnow. 

"International relations must be 
on, the justice of the cause. Open 
diplomacy and no juggling with jus- 
tice between nations anymore than 
«n»ng people must be the accepted 
ruJK r 

mis is the plan df the National 
federation of Education Associa- 
te*" for peace through education. 
v2? " Cmn make war impossible 
uT .!* 1 ?* "»-P»«cJ7*arried forward 
byvfcU the couiftrteVof the 'world, is 
the only thing which can definitely, 
an4 that in some third of a century 
at the very quickest, make war ft 
utter Impossibility." 

The cost of living shows a small 
but steady increose, and the pur- 
chasing power of tho dollar a cor- 

'Tln!? d «* rr *"«- As compared 
w^lh It* 14 tho dollar is now wort'. 
0O.6 sent, -about 40 p or cent b«| w 

iSSHtm M th "' th " W 1 - »' «"«' 
« uited HUL. are letter off than the 

'"• «f «nv oher nation in thi. 
v'ortd brvau,. moat uf th „ n , h 
iii* dollar 



FORMING NEW HADITS. 

Making New Year resolutions was 
once a matter taken seriously by 
many people. It was considered L 
very favorable time for people to 
swear off from indulgence in both 
great and little vices. 

While the majority of folks who 
tried to abandon bad habits there al- 
ways have been some through sucn 
resolves have h een abl 



the grower, it was said 

A committee from Scott county, 
Ky., which represented the county 
local there, appeared before the 
board. A. L. Ferguson, Anderson 
Brown and Everett. Marshall were 
the members of the committee and 
Mr. Ferguson and Mr. Brown, who 
spoke briefly, declared their confi- 
dence in the officials of the associa- 
tion and their ability successfully t> 
conduct the business of the associa- 
tion.- 

Perrv Minor, of Owen ennnty, r ep- 
K ; ciiun K the growers of his county, 
made practically the same statement! 
recalling his experience in sellin > 
some tobacco in Lexington in 1920 
at 3 cents a pound in discussing the 
advances now being paid to the grow- 
ers on the delivery of their crops 
The total membership in the associa- 
tion, as reported by the field ser- 
vice, was 117,754, with between 1,000 
and 1,500 contracts still out which 
have been signed but not delivered 
and therefore arc not counted in the 
total. 

The financing and grading ami 
other problems of the association 
were discussed fully by the members 
of thv board and approval given to 
steps taken in the detail work of 
preparing for the marketing of the 
crop, including the closing of the 
plants until January 7 because or 
the wet weather, which is estimated 
to have saved the growers thousand 
of dollars damage that otherwise 
would have been caused to their 
crops. 

Director of Warehouses Ralph M. 
Barker reported receiptsat capacity 
until the close December 21 and the 
grading was declared more uniform 
than at any previous time in the 
history of the association. 

Resignation of Director Reub< n 
F. Offutt, of Georgetonw, and the 
election of Clarence C. Graves, of 
Scott county, as his successor until 
the next election of members of the 



maintained in .all t! 



ffectivem 



they ever had, and in many respec 
they need greater vigor, 

VALUEJND tax I 

Practically every engineering mag- 
azine and highway bulletin has re- 
cently contained some comment or. ! 
a statement given out by John E. i 
Walker, former tax adviser of (lie 
tinted States Treasury, which indi I 
cates that in 1921 the general tax- 
payer's dollar in America contrij- 



• — te — attain 



board marked the final session of 
the Board. Mr. Offutt has been em- 
ployed by the association in tho 
warehouse department 

Reports on a roll call of the direc- 
tors indicated that the growers gen 
erally are satisfied with the advan-- 
es being paid them and with the geri- 

I eral situation, save in two or three 

1 counties of the district. 

The "dumping" situation was re- 

j portedas well in hand, since the de- 

'• cision of the court of appeals of 



mastery of their own lives ': Kentucky upholding the " "Binghan 

It is a great thing when a man' J ™l Tt "° ^^ tr ° ubIe is ex " 
n A „_j „ . n •' pected from that source 



uted only' 5 1-3 cent to the cost 
building highways. 

Details of the method employeu j 
by Mr. Walker! in arriving at rtns 
conclusion were not made public. ". 
It is supposed, however, that they 
were on a correct basis, since his for- 
mer position as tax adviser to the 
United States Treasury would, givu 
him access to data not available ( 1 
others. His announcement, however. 
conies as a surprise to even many it 
those actually engaged in ro&?l 
building. 

In Kentucky the funds derive ! 
from the three mill tax, or the sin- 
gle source of general taxation, are 
approximately 12 per cent of the to 
tal amount expended on roads an- 
nually. This is really a small co. - 
j tribution from gcgneral taxation, 
I when it is taken into consideration 
I that at least 40 per cent of the cost 
I of constructing modern highways 
. noes for what has been termed "per- 
; manent construction," or building 
; that portion of the road that does 
1 not deteriorate rapidly under actu;.l 

traffic. 
j This permanent part of the ro.iJ 
I buiding is really what adds the lar- 
j gor portion of increase in valuation 
to abutting property, and that Iocat- 
i ed within reasonable distance from 
j the new road. 

Conclusions reached from sound 
' economic reasoning indicate that gei- 
I eral taxation should bear the burden 
: of constructing the more permanent 
part of the roads, and leave the 
; cost of constructing and maintain - 
ing the surface to taxes derived 
i from those who use the road. Prob- 
I ably the most equitable method of 
I doing that is through a gasoline tax, 
and a reasonable license tax on au- 
tomobiles and trucks, fixed after 
taking into account the relatively de- 
structive effect of the two. 

From what was stated above, the 
general tax applied to road buildir.g 
in Kentucky falls far short of pay- 
ing for constructing the permanent 
features of a road. In the November 
1922, issue of the Road Builder, it 



j w a o ohown t ha t during thu fiscal year 

ending June 1922, the following Two men were once asked what 
I sources contributed to the State ! financial investment paid them the 
1 Road Fund in the per c e nt a ge s indi- ' Dt ' s * dividends. 



Susan Fowler, all of whom hav- 

I passed away excepting one brother, 

I C A. F owl e r, and two sisters, Mi>. 

Martha Hawes, of Burlington^ and 

-Mrs. s. f\ T.il-y, 0* Clearwa te r, Ffe 

Eugenia & Fowler was married ;j 

Jerry l . Blj the Dec. 16, 1 j69, wh 1 

pa.< c-n to the greal beyond abet»l 

1 ;, hi ;,••:■!■.- ago; There •.••;■,■ no , .■ 
' : '1 it. if.,- ; M- n; v ., ,. 

I :; R member <,i any ehuivn, al- 
'■- ■ ■■" *as a kind hearted chris- 
tian woman and a most chant. 1. i< 
neighbor. 

1- uncial services were conducted uf 

2 o'clock Monday afternoon at thf 
home by Rev. \V. \V. Adams, of the 
Baptist church, after which her re- 
mains were taken to Odd-Felon 1 
cemetery, just east of town, wheri 
they were laid to rest by the side nf 
her husband. 

Besides her brother and sisters sh%> 
is survived by several nephews and 
nieces, all of whom have the Sym- 
pathy of a host of friends' in the • 
sorrow and grief. 

Undertaker C. Scott Chambers, . .:' 
Walton, had charge of the funeral 
Arrangements. 

WEATHER BUREAU SAYS THERE 
ARE NO EQUINOCTIAL STORMS. 

In both Europe and America thero 

is an old belief that a severe storm 
— the so-called "equinoctial" or 
">-.!i,ino..uul cale" ;> doe about tl.- 
date of either equinox, that is, Marcn 
21 or September 22; or, more par- 
ticularly, about the date of the au- 
tumn;.! or vernal equinox, The fa!'.- 
icy of this idea consists in identfy- 
iiiK any storm that occurs within •. 
week, nf sev eral weeks, of the equin- 
ox a~ the equinocti al storm. Stat'? 
lies show that-:?..:< is no maximum 
oi storm frequency, either in tlv- 
country or in Europe, close to Hie 
date of either equinox. Of tours •, 
in the lung run storms do occur 
about these dates, just as they occu: 
at all other times of the year. No 
reason why storms should be especial- 
ly frequent at the equixoxes is knov n 
to meteorologists. 

In the United States the belief ; >, 
the equinoctial storm as an even: 
of regular recurrence has perhapJ 
been fostered by the fact chat West 
Indian hurricanes are most common 
during the late summer and early 
autumn. Occasionally a severe storm 
of this character sweeps up our At- 
lantic seaboard, doing a jrreat deal 
of damage and attracting general at- 
tention, if it happens anywhere 
near September 22, the event is sure 
to be heralded as "the equinoctial 
.-torm." 

Uncle Add Robbins, 9£ who has 
been quite poorly since the death of 
his wife, which occurred week befor<> 
last, was moved from his home > 
Burlington to the home of his son- 
in-law, John Bachelor's, out on th • 
Burlington and Florence pike, last 
Thursday. J 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 

" _^r^. Z2i 

Members of the Boone County 
rami Bureau met in mass conven- 
tion at their headquarters in ''ttr- 
linton, last Honda; and wound up 
last years barirress and elected offi- 
cers for thi Fuing year. 

I ■ - r ' •"•" " ir a nice lunch con- 

j ' ' "K ol hoi coffee, sandwiches, 
!-s, cheese, apples, etc., was 
1 served and greatly enjoyed by all 
• present. 

■ 'Ihe lack of interest shown by the 
{ farmers in their organization during 
I the past year La to be regretted, and 
J if they hope for the organization to 
( grow it will be necessary for them 
i to meet reg ularly anri get their heads 
I together and spend a little time in 
making plans to sell and buy what 
they need. 

The only hope for the farmer is 
through co-operation. There is no 
reason why the farmer should not be 
tile most independent people in the 
yorld, as the world depends upor. 
1 •••! nr a living, but instead they 
Biiow a Few middle men to come be- 
tvvevp them in bo f !i buying and aell- 
This should not be and the only 
• 1. . > avoid i; Is for them t 



together in one greal 
and protect themselves 



h 



'> stand 
brotlu-rhoofl 



is a demand for dwelling 
houses in Burlington. If some of 
oi p enterprising citizens would get 
busy and build a few cottages, we 
think they would have but little trou- 
ble in rinding tenants for them, due 
to the actions of some of the young 
men and ./.d bachelors who have been 
keeping the rt-adr warm with their 
a ton going and coming. And, as this 
U l.e p Year, wo expect the County 
f; ik to be lipt busy issuing mar- 
tbHgv lueaJMV ihe next 12 months, 
ai'd hou.-e. will be in great demand, 
for the newly weds, 'tis said delight 
in "keeping housed and "boss" the 
Whole business. We heard an old 
maid say a few days agro, "this is 



leap 


ye 


ar, 


and 


you 


mav 


look 


for 


some 


till 


'if 


(loir 


g bt 


fore 


the 


year 


roils 


by 















Notwithstanding the short time in 
which it was advertised and the bad 
weather, a fair sized crowd attended 
the musical and reading at the Bur- 
lington Baptist church, last Wedncs- 
uaj night, given by the young ladie? 
of the I'ctershm-K Christian church, 
and Mr. Hariey Sm J *b, of Lexington, 
and everybody present was de- 
lighted with the entire program. 
Ehese handsome young ladies, tt 
which there were eleven, are sweet 
singers and the Burlington people 
will be glad to have them ma. c 
another call. Mrs. Albert Stephens 
at the piano furnished music for the 
occasion. Rev. R. H. Carter was in- 
strumental in presenting this pr »- 
gram given here, and he also assise 
ifd v. ah the program. 



BOTH ARE BEST 



The Ruilev. Tobacco Association 
last week announced a one cent ra'se 
per pound of tobacco which took 
effect Monday, when the warehouses 
re-opened after the holidays. The 
grow (is who have delivered their to- 
bacco will gji the benefit of this 
raise. The larmeis have the righ*-, 
plan to mark"t their tobacco, and 
.-hoiid stick to the pool. If there are 
any >veak places, they can be remed- 
ied as the pool grows older. The 
Hurley Association can not but suc- 
;■*". d, because it is based on fairness 
and justice, and eliminates the mid- 
dle man's profit. Under the old way 
of selling- tobacco on the open mar- 
; ket, the market fluctuated, and if a 
j grower sold on a low market, he 
lost his yenr's profit. 



mind and conscience are the 
plete rulers of his life, and 
able to make his habits take 
place as the servants of his 
The folks whose habits rule 



com- 
he is 
their 
spirit, 
their 



Discussion of the prices paid W 
the 11*21 crop and of the probable 
return for the 11)22 crop pledged to 
the association revealed the fact thr.t 
the actual return to associatiop 



cated : 



mentality are like a team of runaway JL" 

Jhey m . y „ . blt „',£ ^^JEK.*" *.. paid ,„ 



* — ^ «t «»u, c tv; (.ear 

along the road without smashing any 
thing, but a man's brain and will 
power are unhappy passengers be- 
hind such unruly beasts. 



HOME READING CLUBS 

The fact that people may be lo- 
cated a long distance from great 
public libraries that supply all the 
new books, does not prove that they 
can not have access to the best new 
literature. 

If 20 families will join and pay ir 



Raymond W. Hall, of Kansas City, 
Mo., was present and reported tho 
situation in that state in which th« 
growers are marketing co-opera 
tively this year for the first time tv 
satisfactory. 



tax. 



Sources 
Motor license 
Federal aid 
Donations from cities, coun 

ties, etc 

, ,8 mill tax (general tax 1 . 

I Gasoline tax 

All other sources 



I One, without hesitation, stated 
P e rcentage ; that the most profitable investment 
of Road Fund 1 he had ever made was the price he 
paid for his license to wed. 



A GOOD PLACE TO BUY 

Selmar Wachs, 606 Madison Ave., 

Covington, Ky., is offering his stock 

of fine clothing, of suits, over coats, 

at extremelp low prices. Now is the 

-... j»... «„u pay in . time to buy your clothing, and you 

J1S 1° $5 ea , ch • P* ar » ^y can ' will find that Mr. Wach's stock i « 

the cream of the cur™, .w com po 8 ed of nothing but the belt 



The other, a single man, with 
„, j e qual promptness insisted that his 
14.^ 1 best investment was the price he 
_ j , I P aid for h ' s home paper. 

067 ' K B ° th are right * and both ar * Dest » 
Thus it is seen that the general I l W \ th P rofoiInd homage to worn- 
taxpayer is contributing a relatively ' anhood we - v,eld the palm to the wife 
small percentage to road buildin* j -J* lo - valt >' *»nJ devotion remain 
when the benefits accruing to him a man to the t>nd of his d ays. 

j through the permanent features of I T . he n,an wno is happily married 

is. rich.Jieyond comparison. Wealth 
pleasures, everything is secondary to 
the wife of his heart. 



highway construction are eveua-ted. 



get the cream of the current liter 
ature, and probably all they will 
have time to read. It is a very easy 
matter to pass the books and maga- 
sines along each week from om- 
member of the club to anothe- 
Some of the best informed and mo«» 
up-to-date people in Kentucky ar- 
folks who live in small country towns 
but who have formed reading clubs 
to unite in purchase a „d distribu- 
tion of good literature. 



If she is a good woman (and most 
, of them are) she will make a bet- 



During the paat 17 years the fed 

'••I ' ••«( iMpMton have destroye.i 

niort that, .. MO.UOO whole carcaasc. 

aid mm than li.,000,000 parts of 

UHUtta, Thti. rfoM not indudr 

mail and , .muses d.s(ruy* I 

latf aii'hui itlva 



and you will find that his prices an' 
the lowest. Satisfaction is guaran- 
teed. Mr. Wach has a arge trad- 
in Boone county, and his customers 
should take advantage of the low 
prices he is now offering. 

A WORD TO THE WISE 

Merchants should remember that 
the buying public look through the 
advertising column- of newspapers 

to .earn where bargains may be had 
If your name ami business f„,i„ ,„ 
Hppear in your local pap,.,-, natural 
ly the other fellow" geU th. I 

mu that >ou a th a n e h w wtmhl 

bsMi foil but told the people . t 

tha bargains you had to off. 4, 

Word to Um wine 11 rtumelent 



HOME TOWN TALKS 

What does your home town mean 
to you? 

Is it just a place where you eam 1 V" r man ot him > {or >t is impossible 
your bread and butter, and whicli ; 
you could give up without a qualm 
of regret if you could make more 
of that bread and butter somewhere 
else? 

Are your townspeople just casual 
acquaintances, whom you arc inter- 
ested in BWcaVM they may b». „ ,\. 
to help you in a money way'.' 

Or are they frir-nds, aajocloied 1 
with y«.u in the common uni of I 
building up a heme town, t,e,| ((> v „ u j 

b) common relation In a eomni nitv 

llf« which Iihs heen u help .0 

DO \ ..u (eel ties of loyaltv t« this 

common ^ 

1 , iia 1 



any normal man to live amidst 
the refining influence of womanhood 
without responding in some degree 
to its attraction. 

He even furnishes her the home 
paper, which she prizes so much 
When she has finished her ta^ks of 
the day she finds pleasure in read 
ing its columns. It is there the learns 
of what other women ..t the eon: 
Riuaity are doing, of hew the dul 

dun are progtessmg m ln , 
'' 'be good work the , 
doing to keep the 

n ti>- ti on 1.. 
uiul ei 
thai are of 



The average persons pays but lit- 
tle thought as to what the new year 
may bring to them. True, we can 
!(.t loo!: very far into the future, but 
no harm can come of planning some- 
thing worth while. If we made • 
mistakes during the year just past, 
perhaps we can make amends for 
them during the year HHM. Briefly 
speaking, let us give to the world 
the best there is in us, and be thank- 
ful for the many blessings we have 
1 had given to us. 

Mr. Wm. Vokoleke, of I't. Pleas- 
ant neighborhood, a member of the 
American Association of Variable 
Star Observers. Harvard University, 
Observatory, waa eeg4*tcred as 
sociatc member of the American As- 
sociation for advancement of science 

at the University of Cincinnati, 

where the annual association held its 
annual meeting from Dec. 27, 1923 
to dun. 1024. 

Boone county is hatching some 
enthusiastic radio bugs, who are si - 
ting on late at night listening in on 
what is going on in different parts of 
the United States, be aide 1 getting 
other valuable tniaranation being 
broadcasted from .\II seetloni of the 






■ had a very opui 
V < -\ little feed h«, 

1 I v ihe ti.rmt.rr. 

|f0 uf 1 he ii»«w yea? 

1 and 1 uuxid pani**- 
niit to g«t in- 



'ho 



—* 



■asssV 



mm 



— — 



mmm 



7 



* ,r w> 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



PACE ttv 



NONPARIEL PARK 

Mrs. Henry Holdworth has a axe 
• f tonsilitis. 

Gilbert Smith h;^ been croft* W .* 
the past week. 

Geo. Scott made a business trip to 
Burlington, Sunday. 

Cliff N'ormnn, ot Covington^ snont 
Thursday here ith fi iends. 

M. (i. Martin and wife spent New 
Year's day with relatives at Waltim. 
Mrs. Owen Bradford has for her 
jrue.it Miss Lucille Wilson, of Union. 
Mrs. Cora 1/aile bad as her guest 
a girl friend of Brfanger, the past 
week. 

Mrs. Lullan Aylnr and son were 
guests Wednesday of Mrs. L. 1'. 
Aylor. 

Miss Marie Dorse y lost her family 
hers* last week from old age — 25 
years old. 

Miss Mamie Robinson, of Rich- 
wood, was the guest last week of Mis-- 
K'va Keaaktr. 

Harvey Mitchell and wife return- 
ed home ofter spending the holidays 
here with relatives. 

J. T. Baxter and family entertain 
ed at supper Sunday night J. R. 
Meinger, of Covington. 

Robt. Houston returned home af- 
ter a few days visit with relative.; i 
in Covington, last week. 

Misses Mary and Kathryn Bauers | 
entertained some girl friends from 
the city, New Year's day. 

Mrs. Mamie Cahill and children 
-|u nt Tuesday with Mike Cahill and j 
family of the Pixie Highway. 

M. G. Martin and wife attended 
the funeral of h*-r mother's tinele 4' 
Highland, Wednesday afternoon. 

Lweis Houston wife and son Rol - ; 
ert, spent Tuesday evening with Jn.i I 
Meiman and family, of Erlanger. 

Miss Aieen Chambers, of Walton., 
was the guest last week of Mrs. ! 
Frances Kenney, of the Dixie High- j 
way. 

A 4 .iss N'. Hie Scott, of Walnut HilU, 
wts the truest of her parents \\".v 
Yjiir's day, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph W. I 
Scott. 

Miss Jane Scott returned to he.-! 
college at Villa Madonna Sunday af- | 
ter spending the holidays with her : 
parents. 

Mr*. J.Li' ho - - Renaker and daugh- | 
trr Franei.-, were week-end guests of] 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Franks, r )f i 
Mt. Zion. 

Miss Mabel Tanner, Kev. Cecil ; 
Tanner and family, spent New Year's 
day with their parents, Chas. TgnncT j 
and family. 

Dr. T. B. Castleman and wife and ■ 
Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Lucas attend- ' 
ed the theater in Cincinnati, Wed- 
nesday evening. 

Mrs. Joseph Surface returned *o 
fief home after a delightful visit last ' 
week with her mother, Mrs. Eli Sur- 
face, of Devon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Rouse and 
son and Mrs. Emma V. Rouse, of j 
Cincinnati, spent Tuesday with Mrs. 
Ben Luck's of Florence. 

Dr. T. B. Castleman and wife and ] 
Clarence Carpenter will leave this 
week for St. Petersburg, Fla., where 
they will spend a few months. 

Joe Scott and wife entertained at 
dinner New Year's day Miss Nellie 
Scott, of Walnut Hills, Miss Agne<r» 
Scott and Joe Scott, Jr., of Union 
pike. 

J. G. Renaker and wife and Paul 
Renaker motored over New Year's 
day and spent the day with Rev. 
Wilford Mitchell and wife, of Mt. 
Carmel, Ky. 

Miss Helen Osborne entertained a 
number of her friends with a party, 
Saturday night. A number from Cin- 
cinnati attended and a most enjoy- 
able evening was spent together. 

The many friends regret to hear 
of the serious accident Wednesday 
of Mr. Geo. Goodridge falling on 
the ice and breaking his hip. Dr. 
Souther, of Cincinnati, was called. 
At this writing he is getting along is; 
well as could be expected. 

The many friends here were sur- 
prised to hear of the wedding oC 
Miss Edna Barlow, daughter of Geo. 
Barlow and wife, of Union, and Mr. 
Volney Dickerson. They were mar- 
ried at the Baptist parsonage by Rev. 
Garber. Her many friends here wish 
them much joy through life. 

J. G. Renaker and wife entertain 



UNION. 

Honor Roll of Primary and Intel- 
mediate Grades of the Union (iraii- 
c<l School: 
fclightb Grade — 

Dotetta Barlow. , 

Sixth Grade — 

Lucile Wilson. 

Leroy Bachelor. 

Lloyd M a rs h . 

v ; ' t h Grade—* 

Ijissing Huey. 

Richard Spegal. 

Fourth Grade — 

Pauline Shields. 

Virginia Jones. 

James Bristow. 

John G. Marshall. 
Third Grade — 

Harry Gltnn Dickerson. 

Mable Wilson. 

Marv Belle Bristow. 

J. M. Huey. 

Joseph H. Jones. 

Pat,sy Huey. 

Marie Head. 

Everett Prather. 

Second Gra3e — 

Charlie Kelley. 

First Grade— ^ 

Allen Kelley. 

Harold Barlow. 

GUNPOWDER 

H. F. Utz went to Burlington on 
business last Friday afternoon. 

A cold wave struck our ridge la.si 
Friday night, and the thermometers, 
registered four below at some places. 

Mrs. J. W. Rouse, whom we r •- 
ported on the sick list has not im- 
proved any since our last rrport. 
and her condition has become rather 
serious. 

A Mr. Schwartz, who is driving a 
truck for the Latonia Dairy Com- 
pany, stoped with this writer to warn 
one morning last week and discover- 
ed one of his ears were frozen. Wfl 
have one consoling feature we can 
all have ice water to drink. 

John Edger, the little son of B. A. 
Rouse and wife took sick very sud- 
denly at the home of -iiis grandfather 
and is still there, and his illness de- 
veloped into a case of pneumonia. 
He is getting along very nicely at 
the time of this writing, but is not 
able to be removed to his home. 



HOPEFUL 



DEVON 



Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barlow male (Too Late for L««t Week) 

b business tri,. to the city, Friday. clarence Groger and Wade Ed- 

M;ss Gra Robbins spent New wurt , s are apendinK a short time ;., 
Vpsrls dfly \ ut Miss Rosa Barlow t ne sunnv south. 

The thermometer registered tei Here is wishing the dear old RE 
degrees below here Saturday morn CORDER and its many readers a 
m B' very happy New Year. 

Miss Myrtle Be-mon is visiting !icv j Miss H attie L. Riley has for her 
sister, Mrs. Lloyd Weaver, of Bur- guests th is eek, some relutives an 1 
....j^on. Trends from Louisville. 

Win. r;.«rlotte Bradford nttenc.e : j Mr and Mrs T j Hut9en 8pent 
the dance at Geo. Clarkson's of Un- { Christmas day with Mrs. Annie Ken 
1011, New Year's night. j ney Mnd 8on RoVj of Beaver. 

Mrs Chas. McDonald, of Covm*- 1 M .^ WU ] Summet and son Chas. 
ton, *per,i Wednesday with her par \ haye purc hased property near Louis- 
en ts, Mr. and Mrs. James Gardener. J vilit) and moved there lASt week 

Mrs. II. L Tanner has returned! Mr . and M rs. Albert Miller, of 
home after spending a delightful | Covington, were guests of Mr. and 
vfc« of .cveral days with relatives .n Mrs Vance P. Marquis, Thursday. 
** c,tv Wm. Woodward and Sons Garage- 

Corey S. Acra left last Tuesday for „ t this place adds much to our town. 
Cropper, Ky., where he is teaching w e wish them much success in their 
school, after spending the holiday, t urines*. 

with his parents, L. C. Acra and wife. Miss Ella Mae Kenney, of Villa 

Madona, spent the holidays here the 
guest of her parents, Mr. and Mr: . 
Lawrence Kenney. 

Mrs. Frank McCoy was the week- 
end guest of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Val- 
langingham and family, of Sadie- 




,r$r^*'/?>»**m£* *gur&it** 



START THE 

NEW YEAR RIGHT 

By buying your Groceries, Seeds and other Supplies^ 
from Hill's Quality and Service Store The saving 
will we worth while. 



FLICKERTOWN. 



Mrs. Clyde Akin was on the sick- 
list last week. 

The children of Henry Jump ha\,- 
whooping cough. 

Mrs. Bernard Sebree visited h •:• j " !,e - "burning home Monday morn- 
niother, last we»tt. j lng ' 

Clvde Akin made a business trio ' ■**■ and **?; Luc,en R - vle an ' 
to Aurora, Saturday. ' \ children, and Mrs. Mariah Roacho, 

Master Lloyd Bruce was quite sick ! of Co,d s P r,n KS, Campbell county, 
last week, but is some better. 1 * eW! RUests recently of Mr. and 

Miss Neoma Beemon visited Alice Mr *; T - J 1 H " tse11 ' 
\hite, Saturday and Sunday. | ,. M >". and Mrs. Bren Cchadler an 1 

Master Leslie Voshell and Leslie '■ 1,ttle daughter Ruth Agnes, of (V- 
Sebree's two bovs have whoopin? IM K ton - visited their parents, M-. 
tfU .„h and Mrs. Jos. Sehadler and family, 

Back water made its appearance Saturday and Sunday, 
here last week, up as far as the As!.- Mr. and Mrs. Vance P. Marquis 
bv i<:i,ige. entertained delightfully on Christ- 

' Herbert Snvder entertained witn "•■ eve - a nu,nbt ' r <> f relatives and 
an ovster soup at his brother James fnends from Ludlow, Winton Place 
Saturday night. Cincinnati and Covington. 

The thermometers around here ,-»*■ and Mrs - Wm - Perpy 'elebrat- 
registered from 4 to 8 below zero ed their s,xt,eth marriage anniver- 
(iuring the cold spell. ■■*» «•* Years da >'- These J?rand 

Foster Hensley wound up the 
lutchering for this season one day 



Nobetter Coffee 

A TRIAL CONVINCES- 

There's irreKlHtibile magnetism about this Coffee— mag- 
netism that makes new friendshipx nnd increased sales. 
Coffee- lovers, and even hard-to-please people, who insist up- 
011 something exceptionally good, have found am! are finding 
theirsource of supply; for we're bound hard and fast to the 
time-tried conviction that QUALITY (actual drinking quali- 
ty) is the standard by which this blend should be judged. 

Pound 35c 

Four or More Pounds Sent Parcel Poit P»W. 



HAVE YOU TRIED OUR NEW FLOUR 
WINTER 
PA TENT 



GEM 



FLOUR 



BARREL- 

2-98 P"«ind Bags Delivered to your 
Station for 



$6.00 



many happy returns of the day 

Robert Perry gave his friends a 
surprise Christmas eve. by getting 
married. The bride was a charming 
young ady of Covington. They have 
our best wishes for a happv married 
life. 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Bristow 



ed with a supper Thursday night. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lou Olliver, of Coving- 
ton, Mamie Cahill and children, Mike 
Cahill wife and daughter Minnie, 
Clem Olliver and wife, Miss Eva 
Renaker, Miss Mary Whitson, Mrs. 
Chas. Scott, Jerry Conrad wife and 
daughter Mary, Paul Renaker, Lon 
Renaker, R. T. Renaker, Jack Ren- 
aker. A most enjoyable evening 
was 'spent together. 

VERONA. 

Farmers have been making good 
headway preparing their tobacco foi 
the market. 

Mrs. J. B. Cummins hab been quite 
poorly with a cold but is improving 
at this writing. 

Rev. and Mrs. A. K. Johnson, it 
Latonia, spent New Year's day with 
Mrs. J. M. Powers. 

Rev. Harry Day, of Louisville, fii;. 
ed his appointement at New Bethel 
church last Sunday. 

A. C. Roberts has been confined to 
his room for the past ten days wiih 
a cold, but is able to be out again. 

The oyster supper at the Graded 
school building last Friday' was well 
attended, and pronounced a success 

The Graded school opened last 
Wednesday after being closed for 
the holidays with a good attendance 

Stiffens Roberts and two sister* 
Katie and Kva, spent the 27th ul , 
with tbetr sister, Mrs. Mattie Ran 
*om, of Verona. 



LOWER UUNPOWDER 

Everett Judge and wife are the 
proud pa r ent s of a baby boy. 

Several children in this neighbor- 
hood have the whooping cough. 

Oth Hubbard and wife gave the- 
young folks a dance Tuesday night. 

Ketureh Sbmkie has returned frori 
the Good Samaritan hospital grea*- 
•y improved. 

Clyde Clements wife and children 
were visiting Lennie Hubbard and 
family last week. 

Mrs. Maud Satchwell broke thru 
the floor of a porch and bruised her 
ankle con>ideiably, recently. 

It would be rathpr di cult for one 
to determine just where the Ohio 
river bed is now, owing to high water. 

Miss Mary Hodges, of East B<.-nd, 
entertained Hamilton Hi School last 
Tuesday evening with a social, which 
everyone greatly enjoyed. 

Dr. Ryle on his last visit found 
Miss Sheryl Ryle of East Bend some- 
what improved and now allows her 
to sit up a few minutes each dav. 
We hope she may soon be entirely 
well. 

Manly Aylor while trying to mur- 
der a rabbit broke his nose, which to- 
gether with the backwater which at 
its present stage will not permit one 
to cross Gunpowder bridge, is caus- 
ing him considerable trouble. 

The two year old son of Raymond 
Setters and wife, of Big Bone neigh- 
borhood died Thursday, Dec. 27th. 
Finding that he had swallowed a 
knife, the parents ruhed him to a hos- 
pital, where he died, and was burie I 
Dec. 29th. 



last week, when he killed his porkers. 

Miss Hazel Akin, Alice White, 
Wilbur Snyder and C. J. Akin and 
wife entertained with parties daring 
the holidays. 

Wanted to Buy— Two bred Ches- 
terwhite gilts. Anyone having same 

lor sale address J. W. White, Bur- j and pj/.thor. Mrs. Dixon entertained 
lington, Ky^ p T>. j. State price. j Thurs^r.y Mr and Mrs. Ben 81*=™™, 
B. F. Akin and family, James ' Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Fagin and chil- 
li. Snyder and wife, C J. Akin and j dren Stella Elizabeth and Mash > 
wife, Mrs. Julia Beemon and daugh- Howard Bristow. 

ter, Neoma, Mrs. Clyde Akin and son 1 Mr . Trank McCoy, Mr. and Mrs. 
Lloyd, dined with J. W. White and , j ame8 \ V . Bristow and little daugh- 



BIG BONE. 

Mrs. Price and sons have purchas- 
ed a new Ford sedan. 

The small children of John Binder, 
Jr., have whopping cough. 
— High water hon most all o f — on— 
friends cut off ^rom our town. 

Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Miller have a 
lariio installed in their home. 

James Jones, of Chicago, is with 
his parents for a two week's visit. 

Wm. Huff, Jr., and wife are re 
joicing over the arrival of a ba'.y 
boy. 

Mr. Purdy will resume his school 
duties much to the delight of his 
pupils. 

Clifford Moore and sister spent 
Saturday night with their sister Mrs. 
Coiner Carroll. 

Henry Story returned home Wed- 
nesday after spening the holidays 
with relatives in the city. 

G. W. Baker entertained several 
of- -his— friends from Bearer with 
music Thursday evening. 

Chas. Jones, who has been con- 
fined to his bed the past week, 's 
some improved at this writing. 

The Modern Woodmen hsd is 
their guest Deputy J. H. Latham 
and their neighboring lodge, and n 
nice lunch was served. 



CARD OF THANKS 

The relatives wish to extend then- 
heart felt appreciation to all the 
friends who tendered their console 
tion by deed or word, and especial 
ly desire to thank Rev. Adams for 
his fitting remark*, the Mingers fo- 
their Hervices and Mr <\ Suo't 
Chambers for hi* tftcianl nut hod of 
oonducting the l»Ht riles ..1 m,„ i 
r. Blythe. 



family, Sunday. 

HEBRON. 

A Fiery Cross was burned here 
New Year's eve. 

Mrs. C. G. Smith, of Cincinnati, 
spent last week at her home here. 

On account of so many of the 
pupils having whooping cough, there 
has been a small attendance at 
school. 

The little son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Luther Rouse, who had pneumonie, 
is very much improved. 

Edward Baker wife and daughter 
were the guests of her mother and 
sister New Year's day. 

Bessie, the little daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. Jones, who had the 
whooping cough and pneumonia, is 
improving. 

Sunday school every Sunday at 2 
p. m., instead of morning as it has 
been the past several years. Every- 
one welcome. 

There was a small attendance at 
the annual congregational meetiag 
at the church last Saturday owing to 
the cold weather. 

A group of Hebron farmers held a 
meeting with County Agent R. J. 
Matson at the Hebron Deposit Bank, 
last Monday evening 1 nd organized 
a Community Program of work. 
Plans were laid to do some definite 
things which will b» of interest and 
value to all farmers. Mr. Matson in 
arranging to bring several special- 
ists from the College of Agriculture 
during the spring and summer. 



NOTICE 
To Delinquent Memtun of Brw^r. 



Mutual Fire and Lightning In- 
surance Company: 

Members who owe assessments ar« 
hereby notified that unless such as- 
sessments are paid within the next 
thirty days legal steps will be taken 
to collect same. By order of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

F. H. ROUSE, 

Secretary. 

The cotton market went up in New- 
York and so did the price of under- 
wear. Weather note: The tempera- 
ture will continue abnormally high, 
making wool underwear unusually 
uncomfortable. 



ter, Mary Frances, and Mrs. Perry- 
Dixon, spert Sunday with Mr. and 
Mr.~ Ben H-istow and Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard M Fagin and family 

Miss Hattie Lee Riley entertained 
the patrons delightfully Xmas eve. 
with a literary treat, and Santa 
Claus treated the children to candy, 
nuts, etc., from his bag of gool 
things for good girls and boys*. 

PT. VlEaSANT. 

Mrs. Estella Starcher and daugh- 
ter, Sara Virginia, have retu,rn"d 
home after spending the holidays 
with fr.onls at Clifton, Ohio. 

Mrs. Geo. Heist and son Frank and 
wife, spent the New Year with Mr. 
and Mrs. C lyde Barlow and family, 
of Estill county, Ky. 

DR. GORDON McKIM RETURNING 
FROM WEST, AFTER OPERATION 

Dr. Gordon F. McKim, prominent 
Cincinnati surgeon, is on the way 
home after undergoing an operation 
at Tacoma, Wash., several wee! s 
ago. Dr. McKim was operated on 
by Dr. Horace Whitaker, former 
Cincinnatian, and is recovering satis- 
factorily , according to dispatches 
from Tacoma. 



SEEDS. SEEDS. SEEDS 

WRITK AND (JET Ol It PRM F.SON 

FIELD SEEDS 



BEFORE YOU BUY. 



Northern Kentucky's 



I LEADING GROCERS 
j AND SEEDSMEN. 







m 

ill 

\m 

i 
5 
1*/ 



VUL CANIZ ING. 

Complete line oi Goodyear, Goodrich and Kelly- 
Springfield Tires and Tubes, good Grade of Auto- 
mobile and Tractor Oils and Greases. 

Auto Accessories kept •■* etock. 

GEORGE PORIER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 







The Reds may not like it because 
America refused to recognize Rus- 
sia, but we can get along without the 
Reds and Russia both. 

Hairs Catarrh 

%M^ ut% m%^ n will do what we 

niecuciiie c i^ n f Qr u- 

rid your system of Catarrh or Dea/nest 
caus e d by Ca t a rr h. 



SmU *7 Jruggith far **t 49 y—r$ 

F. J. CHENEY &. CO.. Toledo. Ohio 



FARMS 



129 acres, good house, barns and 
outbuildings 1 % miles from town. 
$12,500. 

114 acres on pike, good house, barns 
and outbuildings, splendid loca- 
tion $10,600. 

72 acres en pike, well fenced and 
watered, 1 V4 miles from town, two 
story house with basement, good 
barn and all outbuildings. This is 
a bargain $7600. 

52 acres close to town, splendid lo- 
cation, Urge barn well fenced, and 
land in good condition. $2500 cash 
balance to suh purchaser with 6 % 
per cent interest. 

A. B. RENAKER. 

ilurlington, K. 

...v tt 



Raw Fur Wanted 




Trappers friend 24 years. No lot 
too large— Nuf 8ed. 

HERBKKT KIRK. 

Burlington, K.v. 



NOTICE. 



I have at my stable* the good sad- 
dle bred stallion, Young Rill, 5010, 
A. 8. H. R.. property of the United 
Slates Government. Young Hill is 
h i.roven sire of high-clasH saddle 
colts, and will make the seasou of 
18*44 at the Krlanger Fair Grounds. 
ArraiiKeinentH may be made for 
breeding by j»ui>1s ihk to 

.1 T. RAFFKRTY, Local Agt. 
Fair Grounds. Krlangei. Ky. 

!l 2t Phone Krl. 186. 



FOR SALE 



An importunity of a lifetime mx 
Ral«tl|fb Heifers age X tnos re om- 
yenr; revUteretl »ml traiiMferrable 
pries »4UI IN), or will kk'I aluglv. 
H II KYI.K A HONH.Graat. K> 



Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Jan. 12th 

"The Lion's Mouse" 

ALL STAR COMEDY: 

"So This Is Hamlet" 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 

Friday Ni^ht, Jan. 11th 

CHILDREN 10c. y ADULTS 25c 
War Tax Included V> Hi Begin promptly at 7:30 




GREAT 



Reduction Sale 

NOT A MAKE BELIEVE BUT AN HONEST 
TO GOODNESS SALE. PRICES REDUC- 
ED ON ALL 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS 

Msoklnawt, Cost Swostars, Pullovort, Kmo 
Pants and Corduroy Goods. 

If you are in need of clothing take advantage of the bar- 
gains we are offering in this aale. 



Selmar Wachs 



605 Madison Avenue, 



COVINGTON, KY. 



J^m 



Sheriffs Sale for Taxes 

Notice is hereby given that I will 
on Monday, February 4th, 1924, it 
being County Court day, between 
the hours of 10 o'clock a. m., and. 
3 o'clock p. m., at the court houso 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County 
and Schuol taxes thereon, and unpaid 
for the year 1923, and the penalty, 
interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of the 
property see Tax Commissioner's 
books for the year 1922 at the Coun- 
ty Tax Commissioner^ office in the 
Couit Houso. 

B. B. HUME, 

Sheriff of Boone County. 

Amount of Tax 
Belleview Precinct 

Pape, Eunie est., 1 town lot $4.77 

Bullittsville Precinct 
McNaugbton, Ida. 265 acre* $207.47 
Carlton Precinct 

Hillis, Val 1 town lot $10.75 

Constance Precinct 
Humphrey, Lewis H. town lot $15.3.3 
Humphrey, Mrs Ruth, town lot $3.9!i 
Ruff, Henry 1 town lot $11.7c. 

Schuc, Jos. n. r. Vs acre $3.00 

Florence Precinct 
Cole, Mrs. Eldora Z>M- acres $65.08 
Gorres Alfred n. r. Lot No. 22 $4.53 
Geirach, E. H. 7 acres land $129.33 
Kramer, Jno. n. r. lot No 68 $3.61 
Meyer, L J. n. r. lot No. 124 $4.08 
Stephens, Ben Est. town lot $4.9!) 
Swim, Allen n. r. lot No. 21 
Reliable Lmbr. To. lot No. 
ton-Boone 

Hamilton Precinct 
Walton, Oliver 30 acres land $16 il 

Petersburg Precinct 
Edwards, Claude town lot $15.8'i 

Gordon Henry n. r. town lot $16.27 
House, Grant town lot $12.31 

Rand.ntl Heirs 97 acres land $231.38 
Shinklo, Fritz 4 acres land $13,06 
Swine, Sarah Est., 12-a land $21.8? 



BOONE CO UNTT RECORDER 



$4.51 

7 Ken- 

$3.70 



A chapter of the Eastern Star was 
organized Saturday evening, last. 
The organization was under the sup- 
ervision of the Walton chapter, and 
about thirty members from that 
chapter were present and instructed 
the seventeen members of Burling- 
ton chapter. Mrs. Jno. L. Vest, of 
Walton, was the representative of 
the State Chapter and she was as- 
sisted by a number of other mem- 
bers of the Walton chapter. 

The Walton members deserve 
great credit for their nerve in ven- 
turing out on a 32 mile drive with 
the mercury hovering around 10 de- 
grees below zero, and their efforts 
were greatly appreciated by the Bur. 
lington members. Those being iniat 
cd into the order were: 

F. H. Rouse. 

Thomas Henslev. 

D. R. BIythe. 

Dr. K. W. Ryle. 

Karl Botte. 

R. E. Berkshire. 

Geo. A. Porter. 

Mrs. D. R. BIythe. 

Mrs. L. T. Utz. 

Mrs. E H. Rouse. 

Miss Elizabeth Kellv. 

Miss Ruth Kelly. 

Mrs. Thomas Hensley. 

Mrs. Edna Eddina. 

Mrs. K. W. Ryle. 

Mrs. Carrie Botts. 

Mrs. Geo. A. Porter. 

Miss Elizabeth Kelly and Mr. F. 
H. Rouse had previously been elect- 
ed by the local organization as 
Worthy Matron and Worthy Patron 
respectively, 



PACE 



«r-*..WVe* i *»V 



►"•>■♦.*-»-.#..•,.. 



COME TO 

& Stc 

JANUARY- 



Clearance 



Union Precinct 

Kt-nrferiy, .1. W. n. r. 20 acres $11., I 

Verona Precinct 

Hnpemun. Pearl n. r. 11 acres $!>.i:', 
Napier, ('has. n. r. 10 town lots 

112.-01 
V al l an din gham, K. K. n. i. rt.s acTei 
_J n »d $15.11 

THE PEOPLE ARE TO BLAME 

Responsibilliy for high tuxes was 
■ laced squarely upon the people by 
a writer in a current publication. 

This is a fact that has long been 
recognized by students of taxation, 
but one which too many taxpayers- 
are not willing to idmit. 

The great trouble with so many 
who pay the taxes is that they re- 
gard them as a penalty. They tak» 
the attitude that they are being pen 
alized for living. 

Anyone who has ever".»dde even 
the most superficial study of the 
question knows that the taxpaye.- 
himvlf can control the situation i.' 
■e will join forces with others of 
like opinion. 

After all, l.ixes are the cheapest 
thing on the market in this j :v of 
v igh pricc3. In most communities 
approximately three-fourths ..f the 
mcr.cy expended from the public cof- 
fers is for roads and schools. 

It's about time that the poople who 
do most of the complaining should 
take stock of what they are receiving; 
in return for the taxes they pay. 

We wonder if the averarre man 
can .-..nd his son or daughter to coi 
leg* i or one-'enth of what h • j ays r.. 
Taxes lor the support of \i,e schiojs 
in the taxing ir ii where ho »',(.. 



DRUNKEN DRIVERS 

Drunkenness is bad enough under 
any circumstances. 

But drunken automobile drivers 
should never be tolerated. 

Drunkenness that can harm no one 
but the man himself is one thing and 
drunkenness that is a menace to all 
who use the streets and roads is 
wholly another thing. 

That is a problem that we do noc 
often confront here, but it is one to 
be considered and one which should 
be dealt with summarily by officials 
charged with the responsibility of 
upholding the law. 

Sentiment against drunken auto- 
mobile drm-rs, who are nothing short 
of potential murderers, is rapidly 
growing and it needs to flourish in 
order that lives may be saved. 

People who are beginning to rc- 
e«tJ the man who drives an automo- 
bi'e while under the influence of in, 
to.vicants, as a dangerous enemy of 
society and one who should not be 
tch rated. There is no other view 
that may be taken of him. 

He is as dangerous as a majmc 
freed on the streets of any commun- 
ity with a loaded revolver in his 
hard. 

Maniacs are not allowed on th<3 
streets under any condition ; yet men 
who make of themselves maniacs for 
the time being become even more 
dangerous**^ -.:„, get behind the 
wheel of an automobile. 
„ The time has passed when they 
should be permitted to escape with a 
light fine or a small jaiJ sentenc •. 
Because they are fortunate enough 
to escape k'lling anyone does not 
make the offense against law and or- 
der any less. 

T}iis type of criminal must 5f 
dealt with harshly, just as the law v-. 
tends the man who makes and sells 
liquor should be dealt with. 



SPECIAL BARGAINS IN 

Muslins, Cotton Batts, Blankets, Hosiery, Table Da- 
mask, Knit Wear, Outing Gowns for Men and Wo- 
men and numerous other items which space in 
in this ad will not permit us to mention. 



Come In. You will Not be Disappointed 

The Luhn I Stevie Co. 



(IXCORPORAMED) 

THE STORE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY. 



27-30 Pike Street, 



Covington. Ky 



PUBLIC SALE 



j Father Bill's 
Homecoming 

f By CLARA DLLAF1ELD 

4....... 

i . 1923. Western Newspaper Union.) 

"Well, I'm sure I hope you'll be 
hnppy with Tom," sighed Mrs. Ma- 
glnnls to her daughter, Clnrn. "My 
experience of married life wasn't a 
happy one, but there may be men 
better titan j-out father, though I 
have my doubts of it. 

"For five years I couldn't call my 
soul my own. Ron ring and rnrapnging 
about the house, he was like a bull 
In a china shop. No, he never laid a 
hand on me. If. he had I'd have killed 
him, and he knew It. 

"Short of that there wasn't any- 
thing too bad for him. Shouting and 
swearing at rne day and night—-" 
"Why did you stand for It, mother?" 
"Stand for it? Because I knew my 
duty as his wife, I remembered the 
vows I'd taken at the altar. Then hr 
left me. Who'd he leave me for? 
You don't suppose I'd demean myself 
by finding out, do you? I was thank 
ful to be rid of hitn. Thut was 
15 years ago. You don't remember 
your father, do you, Clara?" 

"Hardly at all," said Clara. "But 
Tom Isn't like that." 

"All men art like that If you give 
them' their head, Clara. But, thank 
Heaven, I've learned my lesson. I'd 
never be the slave of any man again. 
There was Dennis Simpson, wanted 
roe to get a divorce and :::.. . *$tn, 
but I wasn't taking any. No, Clara, 
and that's why I say I hope you'll be 
happy with Tom, but 1 have my doubts 
of it." 

"Poor Mother!" sighed Clara, kiss- 
ing her. 

And yet the faint memories that she 
had of her father were happy ones. 
He had never been unkind to her. He 
had ridden her on his knee, he had 
bought her toys, pven when he was 
In liquor he bad never laid violent 
hrnds on her. She wondered secretly 
whether her mother mightn't have 
been a little hit to blame. 

I'oor m other 1 And poor father too! 
Anyway, there was no use crying over 
It now. Fifteen years bad elapsed - 
- 1 - " ': '.!<-- ' . -' the • 

parlor floor off his feet, and there 
was no likelihood that he would ever 
be seen acain. 

cried 



"What's that? 
startint.' up. 
"Soineb • \\ ■ r 



Mrs. Masinnla, 



fh 



C 



•\ i r stoppe 



ihK; 



How rm u 
-f th>'.' 

We w .rider if Mr. Aver.uv Citpsen 
eoilrl no oil I £,ed build hinv\->lf a sv-- 
U rr> of loads Mich asw e have to.l-'.y 
for i. -. •rifting ; nd business, vith thi. 
Worry he pa;..- h : new roads and 
for the maintenance of tke-old ones. 

True there may be cases of incom 
petency in office and unwise expend 
iture of public funds, but in the 
long run, taxes are ahont ivh«t th " 



taxpayers make them. 

LIMABURG 

Many people around here have 
colds. 

3frs. Virginia Rouse ha* been veiy 
ill the past week. 

Mrs. Lizzie Rouse has been veey 
ill the past week. 

Mr. Shelby Petti t spent Sandfly 
with William Utz and family. 

Miss Elizabeth Dean is the guest 
of her sister, Mrs. J. P. Brothers. 

Miss Rostta Glass stayed Wednes- 
day nighl with Miss Mildred Gaines 

Miss Susie Utz spent Monday with 
*et„ grandmother, Mrs .Sarah Brown. 

James Brown and wife spent New 
Year's day y with her mother at Flor- 
ence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Gross entertain 
<^d the young folks with a party last 
Monday night. 

Miss Mildred Sehawart:-. is spen •!- 
ing a few weeks with Mr. and Mil 
Arthur McDuxy, of Paris. 

'Mr. and Mrs. James Petit t and 
daughter are spending a few days 
with Zack Pettit in Covington. 

Mr. and Mrs. Whitcomb and fam- 
ily spent Now Year's day with her 
mother, Mm. W. H. Creain, of Cow. 
ington. 

RAfte. putting away the Chnstman 
card list carefully so you can't And 
K next Xmas, bring out the old New 
r*«« rosoliilinna *r,l dust them off 

K' - It trwv «lll fit (Ha yMr 



EVERYBODY'S BUSINESS 

What's everybody's business is no 
body's business. 

That has been the rule of life eve? 
since the well known Heck was n 
pup. 

And as long as everybody pays n> 
attention to nobody's business and 
nobody pays attention to everybody" 
business, ihore will continue to b • 
high tax rates, ine ciency in gov- 
ernment «nd all of the lesser attend- 
ant evils. 

The feilow who kicks the loudest 
about the way things are being run 
is always the last to volunteer *.> 
help, or even offer it constructive 
suggestion. 



who is so engrossed with his own 
affairs — which consists of the gentle 
art of making money — that he never 
has time to think of his own com- 
munity or the welfare of others. 

Other types Kg see daily, engaged 
in this or that hobby, wholly obliv- 
ious to what is going on about the-« 
They never give a thought to th-r 
betterment of things about them. 

The beginning of the new year is 
a time for being optimistic. If there 
is any trace of pessimism left in our 
systems, we should throw it off be 
fore stepping on the 1924 platform. 

While we are turning over our nev 
leaves, we should all resolve to make 
the new year better by devoting a lit- 
tle less time to our own affairs and 
I little more in the service of other;: 

The public good deserves consul- 
cation from every individual. Let's 
:ake a resolution to reseat a little 
time for that duty durinMbe nev 
year and never refuse whenwc ar- 
-ailed upon to do something that we 
don't huve to do, but which will V 
or the betterment of the whol< 
community. 

Homer Gordon, a former weil 
known citixen of Hebron * neighbor- 
hood, but who has been making his 
home in San Francisco, Cala., for 
icveral years, sends a money 'orde- 
for past and future subscription. Me 
"•ays. "I am always glad to see th» 
ORDER. II is just like a lett-r 
from home." 



I will offer for sale at public auction to the highest bidddr, at 
my farm on the Richardson Pike, l mile east of Devon Station 

Saturday, Jany. 19th, 1924 

The Following Property: 

My entire Herd ot Cows, consisting of 11 Good Holsteins, 7 of them with calves by theii 
sides ; Jersey Cow, 4 Holstein Heiters, 2 Holstein Bulls eligible to register ; 2 Big-typt 
Poland China Brood Sows, registered; 20 Poland China Shoats eligible to register; Top 
Spring Wagon, Rubber Tired Buggy, good condition ; set Buggy Harness. 1 Mowing 
Machine. Chickens, seme Household Furniture and many other articles. 

TERMS OF SALE 

All sums of $10 and under, carh: over ttlaT nnionnt a credit of nine months will be giv- 
en, purchaser to give note with b] pj tv< d icci i. y beiore removal of property. 

At the same time and place I will also offer tor sale my Farm, same being in twe 
tracts— one tract ot 58 acres and \he other of 65 acres. Buildings are new. This tarn 
is situated one mile from Dixie fggfcwujr. 1 eurs made known on day of sale. 

W, W. WOODWARD. 

Horrace Pelley, Auct. Sale o begin at 12 o'clock a. m. j 

IAL E WIL L BE HELD IN BARN 



Mr«. Mftglnnff went and opened it. 
A m.tu, muffled up to tiie ear.-, was' 
He came in sheei>- 



outs'.de 



stand 

Nhlv. 
i j 

"I'.iil !" cried Mr* Mn<:fnnis. 
"Hello!" responded Maplnni*. "Why. 
i this must ho (Mara. Well, well, how 
I you've (crown !" 

He took off his overcoat and sat 
down, and Mrs. Maginnls mechanl- 
' rally vent through the performance 
I of ant king him h <;;p of tea. 

"Well, old woman, I've come back." 
Mid Maginnls mildly. "I've decided 
It- settle down now I'm growing old. 
I'm ei'ine to work tomorrow at the 
faeloi> ." 

Mrs. Mairinnis turned upon him with 
savage flercene**. "And do „von think 
yon can leave ine'Tfor 15 yenrs and 
then tome hark th«t way?" she eried. 
"Fifteen yeur* I've sweated and slaved 
to keep myself and daughter, and 
never a penny out of you all tlii*» 
time! Vmi ma take yourself out of 
my house — niy honfle, honirlit anil paid 
for .'" 

"Oh. moiler!" eried Clara, 
"lie silent, ehikl. I'll be no man's 
slave itjraln. You ijet out of here. 
Bill Mairini.js:" 

Hill Maginnls rose up weakly. "Oh, 
very well, mother,*' he said. "I'll g<i — 
yes. I'll go for sure. I guess you're 
right. I only thought you might he 
wiiliug to let Bygones be bygones." 

His meekness infuriated her the 

more. "Itysrones?" she cried. "Y'es, 

i they have been bygones, haven't theyT 

j Fifteen years, and never eared 

, whether »vf lived or starved. Oh, you 

, Boaster! Get out of here, I tell you!" 

Bill gwirag around, the light of bnt- 

I tie In his eyes. "Ah, It's the cold- 

• !• hearted woman you are!" he cried. 



POULTRY ASSOCIATION WILL 

PROSPER THIS YEAR 

At the Annual Meeting of the 
Boone County Poultry Association 
heid last week, the following officers 
were elected for the ensuing year: 
Leonard Kite President; E. G. Step! 
tn«oa Vice-President; Mrs. B. E. Ay- 
lor Secretary and Mrs. Kirb Tanner 
Treasurer. The following Vice-Presi 
dents were elected from the differ- 
ent districts of Boone County in an 
mdeavor to better distribute tl.e 
vork of the Association over the 
'ounty as a whole: Scott Smith, Ve- 
•ona; L. I.. Weaver, Union; Mrs. O. 
C; Hater, Hchron ; and Miss Flor>« 
^rnoTd, Petersburg. The Executive 
Committee for the next year will He 
is follows: Roy Lutes, Teat Tanne*. 
8. T. Kel.yl Chester Tanner, H. L 
Tanner, Mrs. E. K. Witham and Mrs 
B C. Graddy. 

It is the hopes of the managem.-i t 

'hat this year the State of Assocta- 

on will become the largest Poulrv 

'lub in tthe State of Kentucky. Ufcl 

'P»r the largest organization had 100 

members. Another organization 

*old $2,r>00 worth ol eggs and chick- 

ens. If the people of this county 

will get behind this organization 

hat is already on its fee^ ami goin» 

**• can do that well and more. Latt 

vear 13,000 eggs were sold and 8Q0 

"ttmg, were put out on the Pullet 

Return Plan. This year the Pullet 

U-turn will be handled in a little 



different manner not yet definitely Long-headed men are nover sho~t- 

decided upon. Orers for 20,000 eggs sighted. 

are already in the hands of the Sec- R«,i„ a ,.„„ *v; »u . L 

■•*»._ i Brains is one thing: that can t be 

rttary ' syndicated. 

If there is anyone in the county It was a wet Christmas in ro-. 

wtth Purebred poultry who has nn way8 tJun onc . 



joined the irganization thiss is the 
time to do so. Send in your nam.- 
to the Secretary or to the Farm Bu- 
reau Office, Burlington and help put 
Boone county at the top of the lad- 
der. 

R. J. MATSON, 
County Agricultural Agent 

Sun-dried oysters are a commcr 
article of food in Mongolia. They 
are sold either loose or in wreath 
form, spitted on rattan, and circled, 
after being dried, for hanging in 
stores. They are not so palatable 
as fresh oysters, and are eaten dry 
or stewed. 



In an Oriental newspaper which 
devotes part of its space to English 
appeared the following advertise- 
ment: "Mooka Sing and Co. Custo- 
mers sending orders will be prompt 
•y executed." 



re- 



A housewife in Washington 
cently wore a pedometer while doing Hr y*» 
her work and found that by . befe, ' 
■ rr.njcement of her kitchen she 
could nave m ,e th a ,» 54 miirm uf 
needless travrl in a y M , 



Men who do work, as a rule, never 
have to "do time." 

Nobody likes a kicker, but he gen- 
erally enjoys himself. 

The good die young. That's Un- 
reason there is so much evil in fto 
world. 

Congress has plenty of blocs, but 
some one is always-pushing the play- 
house over. 

The English guinea was so named 
because the gold from which it w; s 
made came from Guinea. 

Normal men prefer beauty in w. 
men to brains, a noted authore.- 
says. But they don't all get it. 

The water wagons have gone o I 
of business. But there ought to b 
some way that a fellow can •wei~ 
off. 

Seven fott ball players at the l 1 
iversity of California reeenth look 
ed against a powerful tractor, actr 
»IIy pushing it hack for a loss. 

iy« Ford daMrtad the 

masses when 1\e came out foi I 
idtte Well, if itN true, it, a dowi. 

right •ham*, heeause the mass- >* 
""' "-nty the ilchest man in the 
world 



'If you'd ever loved me I'd never have 
left you. It was beeause you didn't 
have any love for me that I couldn't 
stay. You think you're acting so fine 
and proud, but I tell you you're the 
meanest specimen of a woman rhat 
erer crawled on God's footstool I" 

"Oh, father!" eried Clara, afraid 
that he would strike her mother, who 
had shrunk back under the fury of 
her father's denunciation. 

"And If It wnsn" for the gel," shout- 
ed Bill Maginnis. "I'd bust your house 
about your ears befire I went." 

He swuna toward the door. His 
wife tottered forward. 

"Bill!" 

"What's that':" 

"Bill, darllmr. e«n't we let bygones 
b* bygone*? \M'» forgive and foe- 
get" 

Ten minutes larer, cooing at his 
side, she said: 

"It does one good to hear a man's 
Tolce In the house again." 



Old Melodies in Demand. 
Old-time melodies are beginning te 
regain at least a part of their former 
popularity, although the music stores 
cling to Jar-z. To supply this demand 
• group of song "saleamen" has 
sprung up They can be seen all orsr 
town on Saturday afternoons. Kaeh 
"salesman" baa an automobile eon 
talulng a hand organ or a nhnaogrnpli 
and does a thriving business with 
"Mother of Mine" mid other old time 
favorites Crowds gnfh*r around am 
the music "hawkers" dispose of men* 
copies to pleated patrnaa. New I'ora 



Ijl ISJHUI 

. '.miMi r« i.'iiu exploited: 
, ,,mi .! in - n higher |i'.f -i-rit :!ut' 
tannin than the famous Austria! 
and South African wattle bark. 



IS 

iti 

-.1 



The avcragr weekly earning 

men employi-d in faetories in 



< 11 
NYw 
York state are about twice as high 
as those of women workers, aeeare- 
ing to a report of the State Depart- 
ment of Labor. 



When 
they 

Klrfps 

Balsam 




rsmmm 



\ steamship sendee for direct 
freight shipments between Chicago 
and Manchester is proposed by I 
company which has been formed in 
England. Sixteen vessels will be «n- 
gaged in the service. 



The Presbyterian church is askiti 



ill 



n e 




religious and civic organizations 

ii. *\ .i d-ir.Kton, February 13 
: .."il ii, -• i^aii ; campaign for na- 
tional i."'- 1 ..'. or. ; ( > brittg all motion 
pctu.' i ".i .' i .■ !!■•• under federal con.- 
rwil. *_1 

Willi the new Brotherhood of Lo- 
comotive Engineer Trust Company 
organized labor now has four big 
banks in New York -some 21 in the 
United States. Labor i> beating the 

r 



armer hi 
though th 

labor doe: 

During 
Christma s 

was 



this important business, 
farmer needs it more than 



the two wei ks pi 
the Federal Ban k 
reduced more th: 



Id >-' 



serve 

000,000, the coins being employed af 
Christmas gifts, This is the !arge?t 
pole! withdrawal For this purpose ev 
er recorded. Ninety-nine per cent of 
it will be back in the vault- b 'tore 
ihe month is over. 

The American Association for t'.< 
Advancement of Science will submit 
a new world-wide calendar to th- 
League of Nations. Each month un- 
do] the plan would consist of 23 
days or Tour weeks, the thirteen.:!! 

run" 
5ol." 



The shipments of stocker and feed- 
er sheep and lambs into the Corn 
Belt through markets show an in- 
crease of around 300,000 head fro. a 
August 1 to November I. This de- 
creased marketing of native stoc'; 
may indicate either an expansion <>i 
the sheep industry in the Corn 
\v holding back ewes and ewe lam.; 
or the possibility of an [Hcreasc>I 
marketing of native stock this win 
tcrj in which latter event the Covij 
Belt marketings will be larger tha i 
above indicated. 

The movement Trf feeding sto 
both into the Corn Belt and in 
Western areas was earlier this year 
than last and the movement durire 

November showed a sharp fa „ off. 

The weight of feeding lambs was 
probably about the same in all areas 
this year as last. 

'Ihe indications are that the sim- 
ply of fed sheep and lambs for 
slaughter e r>,v,i "<>' from areas that 
usually ship to Corn Belt markets 
during the next five months will hi 
omewhat larger than last year but 
that the supply in the areas shipping 
to the Pacific Coast markets will b.- 
smaller. But since there are always 
considerable numbers of ambs pu„ 
an feed after Dec. 1, if this numbe: 
his year shows a marked falling o'f 
• »" total market supply of fed stock 
from now to -lime 1, may Be no. lar- 
ger than it was last year. 



msertei 



00 



betwee 

■wii as 



month to be 
and July and 
There also would 
on Dec. 29, not 
particular di 
would be th fi 



• . • I I ■ : ' ■ 

' 1'l.ii. :\ St-.'. 

the war-strid ' n 

peat) i;;.;ions, ii. 
tudenfs of Ru 
•though it is these 
greatest aid is needed. Incidents 
might be mentioned that there 



The t>tal farm value of the princ-i 
pal fifteen crops in Kentucky, includ- 
ing apples, laches and pears, was 
$2O5,!>OOjO0O 1923 compared I i 
? - iOO,328 f 0O0 in 1922, an increase of 
approximately $5,572,000, or about 
o per cent as shown in the annual 
December summary of acreage, pu 
(lucTion and farm value of crops, pre- 
pared by the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture in co-operation 
with State Commissioner \V\ C. Ban- 
na. The acreage of the state s 
twelve principal held crops, not in- 
cluding orchards, was ii, 837,000 acres 
in 1923, or not quite 2 per cent ler.s 
than the 5,937,000 acres of those 
crops in 1U22. Increased total crop 
compared to 1922 is shown by 
crops of corn, oats, barley, 
beat, potatoes, sweet potatoes 

»rgO sirup; while decreased t - 
>p value is shown by wheat, 
ibacco, all hay, clover seed, ap- 
ples, peaches and pears. 

Tobacco was the state's most val- 
uable 



value 



hue 
and 



Friends of Senator Oscar W. Un- 
derwood who have undertaken the 
work of sounding out sentiment in 
behalf of his Presidential Candida- y 
are elated over recent reports from 
many quarters and sources, showing 
an unmistakable increase of strength 
for Mr. Underwood in the impor 
tant northern and eastern Static. 
From the West also have come grat- 
ifying reports. 

With these favorable indications, 
the feeling which has found expres- 
sion among some of the political ex- 
perts to the effect that Mr. Under- 
wood would be "the hardest to noi i- 
inate and the easiest to elect" of all 
the Democratic candidates has given 
way to the conviction that the Ala- 
!\ima statesman now occupies a com- 
manding position with respect to the 
nomination as well as the election. 

The preliminary canvass of the 
Underwood committee has disclosed 
no evidence to support any serious 
apprehension that he will be at a 
disadvantage in the North becau-e 
of his southern residence. His more 
tan a quarter of a century of leaJ- 
ership in public affairs has given 
him a character and a following that 
knows no geographical liminations, 
his friends points out. 




II is for Violet; curtseying she's seen; 
'-^-J Her manners are polished enouc 



lough for a queen. 



Find two other polite person* Left tide down, alone edf e of skirt, tower rlfht comar dova 

llonr shoulder . ' 



C. H. Y0UELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Prices. 

Burlington, Ky. 
Phone Burlington 65 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

In my new office 

devoid Place, Florence, KV. 

Teeth extracted painless. Bridge 

and Plate Work a Specialty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



|it < .«.+. ■♦■«■». »■■»-»-«>■■«>.■»■ « »■■«,.» a ■ ■ ■ |ii| n »ji »it. B 



With the High 
School Cla»»ica 



ti 



crop in 
$ ^ 2. 03(5. 



!,..ti- 



■earc 



oeing 
m th* 

> . i 



THE POWER OF ADVERTISING.! 

Very interesting illustrations of 
the power of advertising are given 
in the sale of certain agricultural 
products, which previously had been 
raised in greater quantities than th<? 
market demanded. As a result prizes 
had previously fallen to an abnormal- 
ly low point. But with £Ood adver- 
tising campaigns, demand has been 
brought up even with supply, and the 
Crop marketed at a fair priee. 

It might be said that the consum- 
er (I'd !int benefit, as prices we 



By MARGARET BOYD 



■» 4.M"». » • i ■ h «ii» m » h mi m u t 



« " •■■»■♦■■•■■•'■• ■• i 



HOW THE EARTH YAWNEr 



bill 



m t - n ii speci 

■ua and G-. rniai 

two nation 

"y -t 
arj 



several millions of childenhhd Cgtjp 
several milions of children in the V. 
K who should he provided with 
proper facilities for a common 
school education, at least. 



2fi !,;'im1,himi [b , was 
230,1 90.U&9 lbs., dark types 
Kentucky's total tobacco 
tha: j was 525,0.00 aero which 

146,250,000 lbs,, of which 223,600.- 
000 lbs. was barley and 222,6T>O,0OG 
lbs., dark types. 



Lira 

an 1 

102'. 

acreage 

iroductd 



Of 
•v, 
in 



President Coolidge asserts that our 
"i>a.t In the World War cost the na- 
tion $40,060,000,000. We have paid 
ST 8,000,000,000, leaving $22,000,- 
000,000 outstanding. Against this 
debt we have foreign notes of hand 
for about $11,600,000,000 including 
the Great Britain settlement. I: 
Ihis were all paid or secured, it 
would leave us with $10,000,000,- 
606 more deht than when the war 
started. Surely America paid both 
m men and in money hut we hav? 
yet to realize cither materia 
'dial benefit to th< world. 



we 

1 or spu 



cost. This sums up the report of 
Henry E James, State inspector an 1 
Examiner oi 1 i: inve. ligation of the 
State Bu*r.' oi Health covering two 
yea'-s. Ihe report wan made pub- 
lic l-y Mr. .".lies under date of Oe- 
cember 28, 1923. 

''J can say that no other depart- 
n.r :t of thi Ttate shows more efh- 
cient management or more economi- 
cal expenditure of money" he 
tii i 
I'.y, 



eon- 
s. Discussing the work of the 
•nic Laboratory, Mr. James said 



raised through the «J.crtising. Vet 
ii i profitable in the long run for a 
imi r t • buy staples below the 
' ■ ; ' [UctiOn. In such a ca.-:-, 
producers would be driven out of 
tin business, much wealth would he 
lost, communities would suiTer, and 
eventually prices would he estao- 
lished on a much higher level to 
make the production pay. 

Advertising is equally powerful in 
stimulating retail trade, but it never 
works to raise prices even tempor- 
arily. The following are some of the 
motives that load business men fc'j 
advertise: 

1. A belief, that owing to their 
special enterprise and study of tho 



'Jhio has a prohibition law tho; 
stakes it unlawfu l to transport liquor 
into the state for a personal bever- 
age, lines up to $1,000 with ir.; 

TKisonment are possible for posses- 
ion of such private- stocks, Th.. 
state prohibition commissioner an- 
nounces thai he proposes to insu.v 
'.hat Cleveland will be bone dry dur- 
ing th" Republican National con- 
••riOtti nevt Jutie. But next Jun« 
* * long way off — and there are 

Vays and means of securing the note 
K-AaS during certain ceremonies. At 
leat, the 1,000 delegates and ten or 
fifteen thousand prospective shouter- 
«re nejt worrying. 



Comparative statements of tho 
COal of public health work in other 
States indicate that the work in Ken 
tucky is as adequately done as in a.'.y 
other StaJ" more .so than in most of , 

them and at the lowest per capital" "~ r « is . thej have a line of goods a 

little below average market values. 

2. Ability to get hold of special 
lots for ow prices, which can be 
turned over to the pubic at similar 
low figures. Advertising makes ft 
easy to work off such lots promptly. 

3. The necessity created by spec- 
ial conditions, to work off goods ftt 
a sacrifice so as to get in fresh stock. 

■i. The conviction that by draw- 
ing more people to a store, it can 
operate at less expense for the busl- 
nes- done, and thus can afford to 
1 make low prices. 

These, and other motives lead peo- 
ple to advertise, and they all tenci 
to create conditions favoring low 
pi-ices. 



i; e 

<' I V 



i UtrV.1 

".ai'f/e-el 



P f(v 
amount f o cu 

pr •'■■■■'. ;it ioi f( 
i'<ai:).." 

Kentuck} V 

\i 'lvuli.-i* v hi 



the laboratory aloue 

I the lowest ordin- 
•lnr services woul.i 



th 



s ta 



i'lina'trn 
the ins 



entire ap- 
Bo'ard of 

against ( i- 
lector char- 



ade-need a> very e tiVetive, he found 



COST OF A MILE OF ROAD 

People are prone to think of roads 
standardized structures which 



Eess than $K t :>UU,000 was approp- 
rutted last year for expenses entailed 
in eniorcing the 18th Amendment. 
During the fiscal year ending June 
30, the Bureau turned into the U. 
S. Treasury more than $5,000,000 
collected in fines, r - penalities, et:. 
This did not include perhaps as much 
more collected in local and state 
courts. Prohibitionists insist that the 
expense saved by the closing of jaPs 
and similar institutions has amount- 
ed to considerably more than all the 
first cwst, to say nothing of the many 
■ifllions of dollars that have founJ 
their way to savings banks instead 
•f cash registers behind the bars. 



According to all reports some 1,- 
•00 or more prominent Washington 
D. C, citizens and government of- 
ficaas had a very close call for a 
decidedly blue Christmas when a 
rertain decoded list of bootlegger pa- 
trons, secured in a raid, was pastel 
•n and on to some mysterious pla«v 
where the light of day is not per- 
mitted to penetrate. Somebody "on 
the job" deserves and no doubt will 
receive a reward more substantial 
than any Carnegie medal. The Dis- 
trict of Columbia is governed by a 
"council" of Congressmen and it is 
doubtful if Centre,,* rMn jj |M j ( j m ^ 

during this brief but turbulent se'.s 
sion to bother with nueh trifles. 



to hu.v been cm. eluded at a cost of | - snou M be produced at so much per 

mile. The problem of highway con- 
struction costs is not so simple as 
that, by any means. How mucn 
should a mile of highway cost? That 
is as easy to answer as the abstract 
question — how much should a house 
cost? 

Before even the ablest authorities 
can determine how much a mile of 



one per eent of tile COSt in som^- 
states. Mr. James also found that the 
bureau ef V'tal Statistics was coi- 
ducte d in ii low er salary basis thpn 
i:i at:;; other State. 

Outstanding among the achieve 
ments of the board according to the 
report, las been the progress in pub- 
lic health work carried on by th- 
pubn. health schools, conferences, 



county health 



clinics ■„< \ all-time 
deoa'tiiKiits. 

The Jiii-p^ctor and Examiner sug- 
gests to the Governor, to whom he 
ndJies-ses his report; that the Legis- 
late re gradually ioe.ease its year T y 
appiopr'ation until every county tr- 
ibe State ha? at: all-time health ot- 
f'..". 



(Boston Globe) 

A revivalist preacher, at all times 
forceful in his language, his religion 
being of the "shirt-sleeve" order, 
had taken for his text, "Vanity." To 
point his moral, he said: 

"Now, if there is a woman in the 
congregation this morning who 
didn't look in the mirror before com- 
ing to the meeting this morning, I 
want to see her; I want her to stand 



up!" 

A single woman arose and stood 
with meekly downcast eyes. To de- 
scribe her in a kindly way one 
would say she was homely. The re- 
vivalist rested his earnest eye's upon 
her. 

"Well, Heaven bless you, sister," 

he said, "it certainly is a nitv vou 
didn't." * y 

Veon'iin. M thin M I Oil to the m ■ | 
can In- cut with present dav miulioi 
<-ry. 



road should cost they must be pro- 
vided with a vast amount of infor- 
mation with regard to where tha 
mile is to be located, the volume of 
travel it will receive, the nature of 
the soil upon which it will be buil ., 
the type of loads rt will be called up- 
on to carry, etc. 

The State of New York has just 
competed a four-mile stretch of road 
along the Hudson River at a cost of 
$175,000 per mile. Unquestionably, 
it is orth it. The State of New Jer- 
sey has spent $80,000 per mile on 
the construction of certain sections 
of the Lincoln Highway which carry 
an immense volume of traffic. It is 
worth it. The old macadam road re- 
placed by the new construction was 
costing the State $14,500 per m'le 
a year for maintenance. The Lin- 
coln Highway Association spent $65.- 
000 per mile for the paving on the 
"Ideal Section" in Indiana. It is r. 
very economical paving for the traf- 
fic it is designed to carry. Often the 
most expensive pavement is cheap- 
est in the ong run. The public should 
understand this. — Highway Engineer 

and Contractor. 

* ^^^^ 

For 200 years Holland has been i 
leading factor in the cocoa induntr". 
To-day Amsterdam alone has 18 fae"- 

t one* engaged in the manufacture 
of cocoa and rhocednte. 



(© by Marg-aret Boyd.) 

" . . . death, a necessary end." 
—Julius Caesar. 

Suppose science could today cheek 
nil death, then all growth, too, would 
cease: for nil growth Is at the expense 
of life. As Hollunel expressed It: 

Ufe evermore is fed by death. 

In earth and sea and sky; 
And that n rose may breathe Its breath. 

Something must die. 

Or s upp ose death were abolished for I 
man alone. In a century or two there ' 
would not lie space on the earth's sur- , 

face to accommodate all that lived. ] 

Re-nan, in weh-oming Pasteur to the; 
French ac ad e my, said: "Death, ac- ; 
cording to a flinught admired hy M. 
Llttre, is hut n functlein, the last and 
quietest of all." Then he added, of his 
own belief: "To me it seems odious, 
hateful. Insane, when It lays its cold 
blind hand on virtue or genius." 

Singularly enough, this last sentence ! 
Implies what has seemed to various 
men to be one of the chief reasons 
why death Is "a necessary end" of our 
existence here. If death were not to 
strike down genius, it might soon be- 
come Impossible to limit the human 
race to tbla sphere. We have an in- 
ventor, for centuple, who has mas- 
tered the laws of gravitation, and en- 
abled men to fly ; we have another In- 
ventor who has enabled men to com- 
municate with each other over long 
distances without wires; and we have 
a scientist who seems to be at the 
threshold of a knowledge of the origin 
of life. The minds of all these men 
are filled with knowledge that they 
cannot communicate to anyone else, 
cannot coniinunienfe to anyone else. 
Suppose these men were not to die — 
what might they not reveal to us! 
What might they not accomplish for 
usi Similar reflections led Willis to 
write, decades ago : 

. . . were not man to die. 

Ho everi- loo mighty for the narrow 

sphere. 
HuiI in i"il time to brood on knowl- 

(•iIrc here. 
Could he hut train hi« eye, 

MiKht he hut wait the mystic word 

and hour. 
Only his .Maker would trnnscend hia 

power. 

Earth has i-o mineral strange 

The illhmt.i hi.- iitr no hidden winj?-". 

Water no quality In covert springa, 
And lire no power to change, 

Seasons no mjratery, and stars n* 
spell. 

Which the unwMUn* soul might not 




F. N. Kassebaum & Son 

(E1KITS i B 4R8LB 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8toch on DtopUv 
to defect from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 



RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Covers and Open 
Door Curtains for all make of ears. 



FURNITURE, BUGQIES & WAGONS 

Reupholstcred, and Celluloid 

Light* Replaced. 



THE HERDING INSTINCT 



— It it natu r al f o r animals uf — ntr 
kinds to flock together. Hence hu- 
man beings flock together in towns 
and cities. The lower animals show 
a kind of instinctive sense in such 
matters. Yon do not find the here's 
of animals gathering in too great 
numbers in any one place. 

But human beings somehow seem 
to have less intuition. Hundreds of 
thousands gather in great city cop- 
ters where there is not food and 
work enough far all. As a cons • 
quence many must live on a very 
narrow margin of subsistence, and 
be deprived ef many comforts and 
necesssities of modern life that they 
might have had if they had remain- 
ed in the country towns that the 
majority of them came from. 



Colorado this year produced 500,- 
000,000 pounds of beet sugar, ot 
enough to supply every man, woman 
and child in the United States with 
more than four pounds each. 

A Rat That Didn't Small Aftar 
Baing Dead for Throe Months 

"I iwm It m 4tad three months." write* Mr. J. 
fiykwlN. J ). "I ww lhimr.it rviryiliy put Mima 
Kit-Snip behind a l«rrel . M out h» al t rrwarda. my 
wife looked behind the barrel. There It waa— dead.") 
IUU>uap talk In three eiaee for iSc 63c, ll.il. 
Saint and gua ra ntee d by 

I) It. BlvMie, Rnrlhigton, Kv. 
(lull.iy A Petnt. Burlington, ky 



This was it stretch of the excoHon 
unit or highway between Tokyo am 
Yokohama. Then eanie the earth 
quake, and tne solid ground whs bred; 
en intei gaping e-husins often in:in.> 
fi-et deep. In VofcoHaiha ;unl else 
where the sir-face of the ground sud 
de-lily sunk hi least three feel ; tin 
faces of mountains wen- split wttl 
great cracks; Islands* like the beaufl 
ful Osltiniii. sunk below the surface 
of the water, and other IslaneLs were 
thrust upward from the depfhe. 



RATSNA p 

f. V KILLS RATS *^ 



Better Than Traps For Rats 

Writea Adama Drag Co., Texas 
They aay : " RAT-SNAP la doing the work 
and the rat undertaken are aa buay aa pop 
corn on a hot store." Try it on your rata. 
RAT-SNAP la • "money back" ruarantead 
sure ki Her. Cornea ready for dm : no mix- 
in* with other foods. Cata and dogs won't 
touchit. Rata dry up and leave no emeu. 
Three adzes: 8Bo for one room: 65c far 
house or chicken yard : 11.26 for barna and 
out boildmaa. Start kuUna rata today. 



Peoole I 



ho use the 
lassified 
ads in this 
paper profit by them. 
The little ads bring quick 
results. What have 
you for sale or want to 
to buy. The oost is too 
small to consider. 



J. C. GORDON 
Superintendent of Schools 

OK KOONR COUNTY 

Will be in his office in Burlington 

the first and second Monday and 

the third and fourth Saturday 

in each month. 



Gulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R.^BIythe, Burlington, Ky 



FARM FOR RENT. 



My farm In Bullittsville neigh- 
borhood is for rent to a good ten- 
ant tor the year* 

Mrs. Lorena Cropper, 
Phone 167 Burlington, Ky. 

ARISTROCRATS WHO MUST 
WORK 

A. considerable number of de- 
scendants of aristrocratic families of 
Europe, thrown out of lofty position 
by revolutions, are in this country 
working- at ordinary and some times 
menial occupations. The man born 
into nobility or great wealth, but 
forced to do manual labor, needs 
philisophy to support him in the ex- 
perience. 

But if American democratic prin- 
ciples are good, the experience will 
do him good. He will develop gyi.i- 
puthieft he would never have felt hi 
his old life. And if there ia any 
advantage in an uiiatroeratic de- 
scent, aa many claim, his heritage of 
character will show itaelf in the 
eournKe mim! gSUtlttfaai with whi*h 
he wil' adjust himself to the hareler 
contacts of life. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 

Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by c4dver- 
tising. 



N. F. PENN, M D 

Covington 

Ky. 



We Test Eyes Right 

and 

Make Classes That Fit 

a? 

Reasonable Prices 

WITH MOTCH 613 MADISON AVE. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

TAKE YOUR COUNTY PAPMR. 

READ YOUR 

COUNTY PAPER 
$1.50 The Year. 

Sabeerlbr for the Rr">BDF° 

..a,—,. — -i. ■■ ■■■— .. ■ ■ ■ ■Sj i| 

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE. 



Notice is hereby given that all per- 
sons indebted to the estate of B. W. 
Nelson must pay same to me. All 
persons who have claims against said 
estate must present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. 

COLIN KELLY. 
Admr. with the will annexrd. 



■aa 



BJPP 



_^H^_ 



100NE COUNTY RECORIER 



page mm 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 

Published every Thursday 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



Korrign Advertising Representative 
■_ THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION^ 

Entered at the Postofflce, Barling- 
ton, Ky., as second-class mail. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 
Furnished on application. The 
value of the RECORDER as an ad- 
vertising- medium is unquestioned. 
The character of the advertisements 
now la its columns, and toe number 
of them, tell the whole story. 



The Recorder Stands For 

BETTER FARMING, BETTER CI1 

IZENS, BETTER HOMES" 



This and That. 



It will be a year of plenty to those 
who help themselves and keep what 
they get. 

It is one thing to have brains, but 
quite another thing to know how to 
n?e them. 

There are a lot of good people in 
this town, but just how near to the 
top are you? 

The politicians should realize that 
they can't mend their fences just by 
fitting on them. 

China buys more bibles than any 
other nation in the orld — about two 
millions annually. 



If people want to construct a good 
home town they must use some tools 
other than hammers. 

Many of the boys can't keep up 
v ith the girls in their studies, but 
they can beat them in base ball. 

Start your boy right, and if there 
is anything in him he will travel the 
rest of the way on his own merits. 

1924 promises to be a bang-iij. 
jrood year for the business men who 
advertise. But so was 11)23 also. 

It is a mighty fine idea to tarn 

over a nejw leaf, but people do not 

Rave to wait until January 1 to do it. 

f 
Begin right, stay right, and you 

will end right. % Of course the other 

fellow doesn't do it, hut why not 

\wii7 

Don't begin the new year with :» 
grouch. Smiles will make the time 
seem shorter, sweeter and more pro- 
fitable. 

If yon do it a little better today 
than you did yesterday by tomorrow 
you may be doing something worth 
while. 

Some people will spend two dol- 
lars worth of gasoline on bad roads 
just to avoid a dollar's worth of 
taxes. 

Throat trouble is said to be com- 
mon now, owing to the. difficulty peo- 
ple are having in swallowing their 
taxes. 

Many enterprising children now 
have all their Christmas presents 
broken, and are ready for their 1921 
supply. 

One of trv most strenuous form; 
of track athletic activity now wit- 
nessed l« keeping track of the rui.i 
i uitn< is. 

Krom the way that Congress works 
i: might be judged that they were be- 
ing paid by the day instead of by 
the piece. 

One test of good January 1 resi- 
tlons is found in the question v.he'h- 
( i people's bills arc all paid up by 
February 1st. 



:• oi..e peopk set m to 
pditiea! eo'iventidf) i "i 
tiie man ior v\ hoi. t he 
!■'■ tl e 1< L'dtsi. 



think thai the 
rid nominate 
galleries hol- 



; or.:e people talk of hanging t'v 



THE RELIGION WE WANT 

The prime test of all "osophies," 
all "oligies" and all "isms" is this: 
Does their acceptance make the re- 
cipient a better mnn or woman? 

Dr.- I'hann.Ng ence said: "It does 
not mattt r so n jeh what a man be 
hevtts. as how ho believes it." 

We want a religion not merely of 
creels ru* cf conduct; a religion that 
s.ift.-ns the ster md givo.t gentleness 
to the \«'ce, that checks the impa- 
tient ws >•! ui I husty reb ,ke. Strange 
is it not, that one should save all hi.-t 
indifference, im-i.tience i nd ill ten - 
per for thoso nearest and dearest, 
while he feels h.'mself tound to be 
perfectly civii, courteous, genial, 
t) a mere Ptrt rger? 

We want a ltligion not merely for 
tho thurth and the Sabbath, a re- 
ligion that yo'i leave at the church 
door as you pass from its sacred 
precincts after the Sunday evening 
s?rvicc, a religion for the prayer 
meeting and public profession. 

We want a religion for the home; 
one that keeps the husband from be- 
ing cross if dinner is late; one that 
keeps the wife from being cross if 
the husband is late to dinner; one 
that converts the honeymoon into 
the harvest moon, and makes the 
happy home like the eastern fig tree, 
bearing at onc» the beauty of its 
tender blossoms and the glory of its 
ripened fruit. 

We want a ieligion not only for 
the bo:re but for the workshop, thi 
office, the bank, for legislative as- 
semblies, for courts of justice, for 
marts of trade Wt ..„„, a religion 
which liberates mankind from th.; 
curse of selfish greed a::d false econ- 
omic system.;; one tint applies tho 
goiden ru'e to the practical affairs .^f 
every day life. 

Brotherhood has been preached 
from the pulpit and platform fo:- 
ajres and yet we are no nearer its 
practical realisation today than when 
it was proclaimed from the hitl 
slopes of aGllilee by the gentle Naz- 
arene two thousand years ago. 

If you would serve your brothe'-, 
eliminate selfish greed and cons> 
crate all your work to the better- 
ment of mankind of your fellow ma-i. 
'I n" serve Cod consists in 
mankind. That is 
your sacrifice to 
Eternal Cod. 

We wani a religion for the enti' 
life; ttne that will mase me stinjjgc 
mor« radiant ; one that wifT glorify 
the commonplaces of everyday lif. : 
one that will smooth the rough pli- 
es and make daily life broghter, bel- 
ter, more joyous. 

Russell II. Conwell said: "Try *,t 
bring more of heaven into the world. 
Don't worry about your admittance 
into heaven, but put your whole BOt'l 
into the effort to set up Christ's 
kingdom here." 

Be a goo i man and you will be a 
good citizen. Be a good citizen 
and you ar« preparing yourself for 
heaven. Yen will never be saved by 
creed or by v'carious rite, but by do- 
irg wed your .simplest duty. ' 

From the fourteenth to the eight- 
eenth of January there will be heli 
in Chicago, the greatest exhibition 
of road machinery, materials and 
methods evtr staged in the history 
of ro: ■.{] making. 

It is difficult to estimate the im- 
portance of such a great exposition, 
eith' r from the standpoints of the 
road uuil h?r or the road buyer. The 
intimal.. contact thus made possible 
between maker of machinery and 
maker of material tan not but aid 
both t do better work. The bring- 
hj lot ether of so many different 
ways i,t road making must be of ii - 
calculable value to the road buyer, 
the county and State engineer, th.' 
ro.id sjpervisor, and the taxpayer. 

But perhaps the greatest bene!u 
ftcm this mutual contact of the for- 
ces ttbjvh are behind the good roads, 
s in the laying before the country, 




TURN ME OVfcR 



i 



aqoi. sado\j veijisaiuAi 



&*<•*•> *>A . 



- Trcds W&fra They All Trade 



WE WISH ALL OUR 
FRIENDS AND CUSTOMERS 




A VERY 
HAPPY NEW YEAR. 



. ifiAT boy d( you rs i rv, 
£oll*2£e siudyxnd for any, 
particular profession S 




r^^Vf 




We have a DeVoe Calendar and Weath- 
er Chart for you free. Come in and 

• get it. 



serving 

your offering and j 
the Infinite an i ! 



Rasping coughs 
quickly stopped 



KM *,DE of just the medicines 
' th^t the best doctors pre- 
scribe for a couph — combined 
with the well-tried healing and 
i;.-"ihirig powers of pine-tar 
• v.iriev — nothing like Dr. Bell's 
Pirtf-TSi Honev to quickly stop 
coughing, lo >sen phieem, ease 
brcitthing, and overcome throat 
dryness. Pleasant to taste, too. 
Keep Dr. Dell's on hand for all 
the family. 

All druggists. Fc sure to get 
the genuine. 

OR. BELL'S Pine-Tar Honey 



We hope to be as well remembered in 

1924 as we were in 1923. 

WE THANK YOU. 



Kansas Kream Flour. 



Arcade Flour. 






GROCER <&■ SEEDSMA/V 



WHOLESALE— "Covington'* Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18-20 West Seventh St. 

Phone, ouih 33 5 .„d 336 COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 



J 



Drfess'y Crepe Overblouse 



red flag over the White House, but j tne magnitude of the effort involved 
there is no room fhr anything but an d -showing forth to the world 



the stars and stripes. 

Some people claim that automo- 
biles are not as safe for driving. -pur- 
poses as horses, but anyway they will 
stand without hitching. 



out into the country for winter 
sports, often make considerable spjrt 
for the observant natives. 

One profitable New Year resolution 
that the business man can make, is 
to use printer's ink a leetle more lib 
erally than he did last year. 

The kid who used to be satisfied 
with a bright new copper cent for 
Christmas, was probably expecting 
a $2.50 gold piece this year. 

The people who can't remember 
where their Christmas gifts cams 
from, are now having trouble writ- 
ing their letters of acknowledgment. 

The girl* would conisder it per- 
fectly ly-flp.'J ■/.,. aek the men to Mart 
pf tt-tii durng t rnp Year, if that 
was the ;.>oct e» ivi. "it >vay to do th<» 
ioli. 

The Leap Year custom recognizes 
the fact that there are plenty of old 
"bachelors who' would be glad to get 
Married if some one had the courage 
to ask them. 

Some people think war will never 
re abolished, and about 125 years 
.'go a lot of peopki thought the world 
would always do Its traveling on 
•e roarhca. 
The suggestion is reapoetfuliy 
wide i hut the name ol the Confreaa 
i»{ tin 1'nited Stales <>( Ameru-i 
rid 04 cuanged to the Wadhrng 
I' bating #« ctftv. 



what progress has been made in the 
hard surface highway idea. 

Twenty years ago, before the au- 
tomobile was more than a toy, tl.e 
road idea was dead. "We didn't need 
roads. The roads we had wee 
borne of the ctty people who com e | g nnH gnnngh, T» spend mono;, 

roads was foolish. The railroads g&\ u 
all the transportation necessary 
Roads were merely an expense, r. 
luxury, not an esset!" Such argu- 
ments were common. There were n.> 
road builders, there was no road 
buiding industry. Today there ar ■ 
thousands of engineers, hundreds of 
firms making hard road building ma- 
chinery and products for hard ro*d 
making, and there is not a State un- 
interested in modern highways, n >t 
a county which isn't talking good 
roads, not a farmer who does \ t 
realize the need of them. 

This great road exposition is a re- 
flection of the times, and the senti- 
ment which is behind roads; luud 
roas, the sort of roads which mini 
mize tc hauling cost and give .he 
maximum of speed and intercom- 
munication. 

The road exvosition at the Colts 
eum in Chicago, is more than an »- 
hibit; it is a monument to the mod- 
ern idea of transportation. 



Prof. Pheyney, of the University 
of Pennsylvania, and president of 
the American Historical Association, 
advocates the elimination of all pa- 
triotic color or propaganda in our 
lOhOOl history text books. Crrtai.i 
educators mom determined i<> elim- 
inate all patriotic inntiment connect 
cd with the revolution against Bna 
land. 



"Do Rats Talk to Each Other?" 
Asks Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 

"I Rot Dvc caki-s of Rat-Snail ami thr\-.r pieces 
arnunil feed store. Got about halt a Aax :. dead rati 
a day (or two solid week*. Suddenly, they tot fewer. 
Mow we haven't soy. Wh'i idldtbem about K.it- 
Pnap." Rats dry up sod ltavc au sui'-ll. 1 Lice 
Hits; J5«., 05c. $1.25. 

Sold and guaranteed by 

Galley & Pet tit, Burlington. Kv. 
I). R* Blythe, Burlington, Ky. 

The twentieth anniversary of the 
first airplane flight was fittingly cele- 
brated by the epochal cruise over 
Cincinnati and Dayton, in an air- 
plane equipped with a Crosley radio 
receiver and a high-powered ampli- 
fier, by means of which music broad- 
cast by W L W was heard on the 
ground, thousands of feet below. The j 
plare was pilote I by Jack DavV, \ 
who also operated the radio recc-iv- 1 
ipg set. 

This successful experiment, eon j 
ceived by Powel Crosey, Jr., Pre^-' 
dent of the d'osk-y Manufact-ir'':: 
C ompany , v,as c-irr : ed out most su.- 
cessfuly **. 1 1 « I shows f< what extent 
the airplane ar d the radio may 'i.- I 
used in all kinils of 'vork. The con 
li'iaion of these l\\ c great forces ol 
science, makes a sort of mod* n 
Paul Revere out of thi aviator, but, 
instead of spreading warnings, i* ■•■ 
radio set with its amplitier, sent forth 
music to the crowds of inton 
Listeners on the highways below 'i'hi< 
i'! a iiiay be U^ed in the future to 
supply music to marching throng.- 
throughout the city, for with a flci r 
of airplanes, ttaipped with radio 
receiving sets ;nd amplifiers, it will 
be nossibk- to fly t\er the heads o r I 
the marchers and send forth a flood 
of maitial music t':.et will keep the 
paraders stepping. Then, too, the 
Crowley ario-equip perj airplane cou'd 
bo i:st'(i to spread information and 
d ; ". •• •! • s to people who might be 
marooned in floods, isolated fro?:: 

c outside world by some calami*v 
and other missions of mercy. Time 
alone will tell of the uses to which 
such a piece of odern apparatus wi'l 
be utilized. 

The simplicity of the construction 
of the airplane controls and the tun- 
ing of the radio receiver, made :r 
possible for the aviator to perform 
this modern miracle of the air. The 
airplane is the JN-4 type and the r-i- 
dio receiving set, is the regular Cros- 
ley Model X J, with its tuned radio 
frequency amplification circuit. In 
this successful experiment, 6-voP 
tubes wore used and the amplifying 
device, hwich sent received music to 
the crowds below from the plane 
contained the Crosley Sheltran trans- 
formers. The aerial was strung 
around the wings of the plane and 
the receiving set was grounded to 
engine. The large amplifying born 
was placed in the exhaust system of 
the engine, permitted the amplified 
radio concert to be heard celarly h 
those listening, thousands of feet be- 
low. 

The American Federation of Labfl 
on the basis of its last report, bad 
lost well over a fourth of the n\o\ i 
hershlp it had enrolled in Unit). 

Last year Ontario produced mo 
fiOO.OOO pounds of factory ebl 

..it of ■ total of i'U,(>:iit,uo() pounds 
for the whole of Canada 




REDUCTION of TAXATION 

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION PROVIDED FOR 



Copyright, IMS, by National Budget Committee 



Silk crepe, in two colors,: started this 
dressy overblouse Oh Its bright career 
smd new style features contributed to 
its triumph. They appear in the nar- 
row vestee and treatment of ornamen- 
nil stitchery find embroidery which 
elaborates the desijrn. 



I 







MENTHOL COUGH DROPS., 
for nose and throats 

Give Quick Relief; 




* i 



cause many case*' f constipation. 
flatulei.ee. heacsxhe-ausea. bad 
breath, sleeplessness and emacia- 
tion. 
FREVS VERMIFUGE 

is ■ • «tf. old- 1 ••!> ionr.i «m'd« for 
worm*. In u»« for over seventy- 
five roars. 

30 cents a bottlm 
•I your dealers, or sent bjr mail oa 
receipt of price 

E 4S.FREY m 
Easb t SaadhMS Sa Dsstl 

Bahunota. Md. 




N proposing a 
general rcdue-' 
tion of Federal 
taxes Secretary 
Mellon declares 
that the people of 
the country should 
receive the benefits 
of the substantial 
reductions which 
the revenues of the 
Government are 
now sufficient to 
justify. The Presi- 
dent in his message 
speaks of relief for 
the people, of giv- 
ing every home a 
chance, of lifting burdens that weigh 
most heavily upon the poor. A 
fair inquiry is, then, the extent to 
which the reductions proposed do 
inure to the benefit of the people. 
How widely will they be distrib- 
uted and in what proportion are 
the remissions to the several 
abilities of the beneficiaries to pay? 
An examination of the table pre- 
pared by the Government Actuary 
to show the estimated results of 
the proposed revision discloses 
that the income taxes of 13,124.600 
individuals with incomes of $1,000 
to $6,000 will be reduced by 
$°2.750,000 during the year 1925. 
The Government will take another 
loss of $52,100,000 on the income 
taxes of 55830 individuals whose 
incomes range from $6,000 to 
$10,000 a year. In other words 
more than 65 per cent, of the relief 
from income taxes which it is pro- 
posed to grant will be enjoyed by 
individuals with incomes of $10,000 
or less who will constitute more 
than 93 per cent of all the indi- 
vidual income tax payers. Accord- 
ing to these estimates income 
taxes to the amount of $72,285,000 
will be remitted to the 324,000 indi- 
viduals whose incomes range from 
$10,000 to $100,000. That is to say 
32J4 per cent of the oposed in- 



_^ Income V 

•43,fj93.3SZ07B 



1 



WL 



t%t/ 



Balance\ --,-- 
.9 335.681.63^ 

WHO IS GOIHG TO Git 

THIS BALANCE Pi^ Whe » 1 
"to analyze 



come tax relief will 
go to something 
over 23 per cent 
of the total 
number of indi- 
vidual income tax 
payers". The re- 
maining $4^65,000, 
or a |htle more 
than 2 per cent of 
the proposed relief, 
will go to the 4,865 
individuals having 
incomes of $100,000 
or more. 

we come 
lyze the fair- 
ness of these pro- 
posed reductions in the light of the 
abujtyof the several classes of indi- 
viduals to pay income taxes, a diffi- 
culty arises because there are avail- 
able no detailed estimates as to 
what would be paid in 1925 provid- 
ing no changes were made in the 
present law. Some illumination may 
be obtained from the definitive 
figures for 1921, the last to be fully 
tabulated, although in those tables 
the segregation of classes differs 
somewhat from that made by the 
Government Actuary for 1925. 
These figures for 1921 show that 
individual taxpayers having in- 
comes of from $1,000 to $5,000 paid 
only 12.9 per cent of the total in- 
come taxes for that year. Those 
^« e ^ ng incom « from $5,000 to 
$10,000 Pai d 9.57 per cent of the 
total, and those receiving incomes 
?«J, rom $ 10 -°00 to $100,000 paid 
49.42 per cent of the total leaving 

Tvii pe T. ? cnt t0 bc P aid by the 
£,ps individuals, or .03^ per cent 
of the total number of individuals 
paying income taxes, who received 
incomes in excess of $100,000, 

Making doe allowance for the 
different bases of computation, it 
would seem-a-fair conclusion that 
the proportionate distribution of 
the proposed tax remissions is just 
and reasonable. 




Established 18S6. 



"I Got Real Mad when I Lost My 
Setting H«n," writs* Mrs, Hsnns, 
N.J. 

" WTien T went into our barn and found my best 
setter dead I go', real mad. One package-o] Rat- ' 
Snap killed *tx big rats. Pourrrr raism should ass 
RaloiMp." Cmw! in cake?, no mining. No smell 
tromdeadrats rhireniarv Prices. .We, 65c. tl.JS. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

1>. K. »>i., .lie. rtui-lingMin, Ky. 
liulle.v AP-iti t. Burlington, ky 



FOR SALE 



' urn' >>i forty s«'V*-n aor»»«> on lb'- 



'<!• Il 

h.i- 
Ittlta 

Slid 

nn 



pis •- ii nr hi uiHiuirK, Ky ; tr<><»i ' 

• .nil isll ii •o- , -»*Hry nut Inn id- ! 

• Ifciru- liuhM; plenty oflmii i 

> it i r. A li.-mii ilnl h.. iiif I 

I Dl'NSON. 

It f P Ft.. r ».iii-.., Kv 



Begin The 

NEW YEAR 

RIGHT 

Opening a bank account is the n.cst practical 
beginning. Adding to it givt?s you a cemfc-t table 
end satisfied teeling of security. It also si'tniuietts 
your energy and insures your future, if you con- 
tinue in the same way. This bank invites jcu to 
become a depositor and 

GROW WITH IT 

Boone Go. De>pcsit> Bank 



I-i ..Idit on to the United State*, 
Canada tud Itsly are the only rout, 
known in which it is bcsiwi-.l 
helium might be obtained in commt'i 

I untitles. 



Burlington. Kentucky. 



Subscribe For The Keren tier 



$1.50 per year 



. 



PAGE 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 




AW.WHATSTHEUSE 



ThHE nAPPEftS OP loDAI MAY BE 

all RtcjHr eur They're The. 
most* UNT»OV 



ByL.F.VanZe!m 

® Woim Newtpaper Union 



CH AUNT FANNY / 
I'VE LOST MY Q\>\6 P 



Guess Felix Was Right ' # 




Thai the iloone County Poultry 
Association i- gaining quite a repu- 
tation away from homo is shown 
from the following taken from Far- 
mers Home Journal, Louisville, Ky: 
"The Boone (' uu'y Poultry A-sui - 
iation is an active organization and 
has heen of inestimable beri'elt ti- 
the poultry industry of that sectirn, 
as .rtay he seen from the followin g 
brief outline of it -> work in 1923: 

"Forty-four special breeding peiia 
were established. The association 
sold 13,000 eggs for cash and put 
out 3r&40 on the Pullet Return Phn. 
At their poultry show early in De- 
cember, a total of $600 was given in 
premiums. A splendid entry of ex- i 
cellent birdggresuited- More than S"' ' 
culling demonstrations were held in i 
different parts of the county las; 
year. 

"All the work of the Poultry A:,- 1 
s»ociation was done under the super- i 
virion of their former county agen:, j 
W. D. Sutton, who ras been etupiov 
ed by Hopkins county for 1924." 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 



There was a 
•irt Monday. 



attendance 



Gel your dog tax and save further 
trouble with your dog-gone dog. 

Ber! Berkshire has been laid n,i 
for several days with a severe cold. 



There was very little husitn's 
transacted in the county court Mon- 
day. 

•lames Rullock, of near Heluo'. 
was a business visitor to Burlingtor., 

Tuesday. 

This being Leap Year, the young 
ladies and old maids are rehearsing 
on the fox-trot. 



Representative Samuel \V. Adams, 

who was unanimously' chosen as J 
Speaker of the House at the Demc- 
cratic caucus at Frankfort, Honda,, 
was born in Boone county 50 year., 
•age. After completing the Boone j 
■eour.ty schools he attended tin- Ke< 
College of .!-■'" ->» fw» -/». where n, 
graduated in 18*8, He wa* <'• ■•■ 
Representative from Keutdrf"coum> 
in 1902 ■,.() !i'f|J4.. Us stayed awni 
!r '' ' : '•' nfcfr.rl until the session 6 
IUwU and \ ; • again elected for th< 
it.'.l tessicn. Mr. Adams is metric; 
■ n.. lives ai Erlanger, and has quit) 
an wrfaenaive law practice at the Ken 
'on tountv bar. 



Seymour Wilson, of 
cesville, was a busines 
Burlington, Tuesday. 



near Fran 

i visitor l) 



Albert William, the little son of 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Weaver, has been 
quite sick for several days. 

R. H. Stephens spent several days 
last week, with his hrother, B. C. 
Stephens, in Rising Sun, Ind. 



C'J : 



Petersburg, 



.- 
Fla 



-j^^ 



whei 



'*«*lt: 



iirht 



-pemi the remainder of the wii 



TRADE IN CARS FOR SALE. 

1916 Ford Touring Car $ 

1916 *' " •' ' ■ 

1916 " •' " 

1917 '. 7.7. 

1917 " '" " 

1917 " " " 

1917 " " " 

1919 " " " 

1917 Roadster 75.00 

!9 17 5o!oo 

«*« 85,00 

191 9 " 175.00 

1922 200.00 

1918 Coupe 125.00 

Smith-Form a Truck 100.00 

Ford 1 Ton Truck 200.00 

Cheurolet Touring 490 59.00 

1919 Nakland Sedan good condition $ 350 00 

The above cars are bargains we are trying to get room to 

store new cars for spring. 

C. W. MYERS MOTOR CO, 

Florence, Kentucky- 




ter. 



The Ohio river after reaching a S<J 
foot stage began to recede Mondav. 
The high water caused many of those 
living along the river to leave their 

•>» ; homes. 

The fiscal court was in .session I — ! — — 

Tuesday and passed on the delir-1 B ." *' Stansifer, one of the young 
<MH'nt tax list presented by the ! ous ' ness men of Walton, was among 
flthenn*. The court appointed a I thosc in attendance at court, Mon- 
<ommirt< ■<■ to investigate the feasi- j day ' and ne '"ade the Recorder office 
t>ihty of getting gravel from the a P ,easa nt call. 

river to ^thp ToaiiR within a few | — — 

miles of the Ohio river. All persons j The W »U« of W. B. Norman, of 
wgofcave done road work and hav Walton . Thomas Corcoran, of Bui 
not been paid are requested to pre- 1 1,ttavi,,e - an <* Mrs. Eugenia Blythe, 
cent their claims to their magistrate j of Burlington, were probated in fie 
ai °i''«?. I county court Monday. 



v.»S /m'V^ 8Tate in t*»l AH P er sons who have War Savings 

urlv! \°/ N 7 E ' Ridde " last Sat-I Stamp* series of 1919, should tak, 
Z* J« Set fire t0 the car- 1 them to their bank or the rWoAce 

Ihl ™ f l00 . nn ff- L The s, »oke filled I for redemption as the interest eeas- 
v i ™M nd a,s0 the roorn in whi-hied on them January 1, 1921 
Mr > and Mrs. Kiddell were sleepinr ' 



FOR SALE ETC 
mtity") 



For hardware and paint for youi 
new house, see me. Hope Conner, 
Florence, Ky. 

TURKEYS FOR SALE 

Toms $8 and $18; Pnlleta $6 and 
$8; Guineas, Tic. Mra « E. AyWr, 
BurlingtOB, Ky. 




Coughs that 
hang on— 

Break them now before they 
lead to more serious trouble. 
Dr. King's New Discovery 
stops coughing quickly by 
stimulating the mucous 
membranes to throw off 
clogging se- 
cretions. It 
has a pleas- 
ant taste. AD 
druggists. 



HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 



BUCK JONES IN 

"The Footlight Ranger" 

Lupino Lane Comedy "THE PIRaTE" 

Admiaaion 22 Centa, Children 10 Centa 

War Tax Included 

PUBLITSALL 

Having sold my farm, r will offer for sale at my resilience, 3# 
miles south of Union, Ky., on the Hathaway Tike on 

r&feSi Jan. 12, 24 




WANTED 

Tenant for 1924. James Bullock, 
Burlington, Ky., %. D. 8. 
olOjan — 2t 



»nd' when they awoke at 4 



thev fnnnY >,• r. " 4 *' lfl • ! SlnC < the fir - St ° f the 

t?lTl*L ?°.: '" f,a „ mes - Th - ! **t -of our good frie*d 



Since the first of the year a nuni- 



s from all 
parts of the county have called in 
and had the date of their suhscrin- 
tion moved up another year. 



fire was extinguished in a few minu- 
(*M. The damage was small. 

The Recorder received, one d<v, 

'EncloSd find ™ a ^ d,ana ' y ° UnK famerS of n"""™ P reci " c C 

new vear 1094 n?' *****<* the ' attended court Monday. He called ?t 

rvo U ,nfl M«ny good w..sher,! this office and watched the operator 

h°a r s re„ a 1C r from tr 5£ H ^ '^ k,^ on the Linotyp, 

r„SsTo an g;t y r;e\ews ^d «?»* « «• «^ «*- mm 

'Old Kn B ^ v Home * ' I ?- f ^ he PaSt Week ' therc has been v <" ? 



For Sale — Six pure bred Buff Leg- 
horn cockerels. James Bullock, Bnr- 
lingtin, Ky., R. D. 8. 

olOjan — 2t 




The Following Property : 

I Three g^ood milch Cows- one fresh Jan. 14, one March 17 and one 
J in April ; 9-yr. old Mare- good worker, and safe for lady to drive- 
2-horse Road Wagon, Mowing Machine, Hayrake. Oliver Chilled 
Plow No. 20, Dixie Plow, "A" Harrow, set Work Harness, 2 Brid- 
les, Collars, Man's Saddle, Rubber Tire Buggy and Harness, 
Economy Cream Separator, Hayforks, Barrel Salt, Meat Blocks' 
interest in Scalding Box, some Bees, some Household and Kitchen 
Furniture. 



UR. K.IINC1 5 NEW DISCOVER Y 



FARM FOR RENT 

Twelve acres for corn, 3 acres for 
tobacco. House and outbuildings, also; 
j want dairying. For Sale — New Super I 
j Hatch incubator, 125 egg capacity. 
1 Warring Flick, Union, Ky. 
! olOjan — pd 



NOTICE— See M. B. Rice, Rabbit 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford cars 
and Ford Tractors. 



Well made sleds: 1 and 2 horse. 
.Sold by Walton Lumber Co., Walton, 
Ky. Made by CONNER & KRAUS, 
Florence, Ky. 



H. L. BTcCUaaaon, of the Hehrji. 
neighborhood, was at court Monday, 
and he called at the Recorder offk': 



.,..,1 U«J H. ,- •'».....- 1. wounn <>IIU W11C, Ol ia:i 

and had the paper sent to his son, | wild, and Dr. T. B. Castleman and 



NOTICE— Will hang waU an1 
little coming and going. It has heen ceiling paper any where, guaranteed 
quite a big job for the citizens f> work, prices right. Ten per cent dis- 
cret "tuned" in on the zero weather, count on paper. For further informa- 

— tion write Geo. Hobner, 505 E. I3th 

James T. Gaines and wife, of Idli. Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



Henry R. McGlasson at Los Angeles, 
Gala. Henry has been in the lan.l 



of sunshine and flowers about tw > 
weeks, and reports that he likes it 
fine. 



According to the weather bureau 
last Saturday was the coldest weath- 
er experienced in this part of the 
country since 1918. In Burlington 
the thermometer ranged from 2 to 
10 below zero. Owners of autos had 
trouble keeping their radiators from 
freezing, and many were put out of 
commission. 



The Bureau of Jewish Rescar -h 
reports that the United States now 
leads the world in Jewish popula- 
tion. New York has more than five 
times as n any Jews as Vienna of 
Varsaw. 



Sheriff B. B. Home and Attorney 
G. W. Tolin went to Franfort on 
the "Adams Special" to see that the 

Legislature was properly set to work. 

Washington. Oregon and Idaho 
f>reituce r early half of the commcr 
cial iif;. ifi of the United States. 

FLORENCE. 

The member" of the Boone County 
Poultry Association in the Florence 
precinct will meat at the Farm Hu 
reau Building at 7 o'clock Friday <•>- 
-enlim, Dec 11th. All who are inter- 
ested In pure brad poultry are urged 
le uiund thai meeting 



wife, of Florence, expect to leavi 



For Sale— Two Na. I fresh cows, 

today (Thursday) for St. Petersburg ' « alve8 b y si(ie ' T ' B - ^3*** ''• H 

Fla., where they will spend the win' j Acr *. Floren ce, R. D. 
ter. 



Why Mr. N. WindW <R. t.) Put Dp. 
with Rata for Years 

''X**™ "*° ' « nt ion,e r,t WO", which nearly 
killed our fane watch dog. We pot up with rati 
until * fri»Bd toM me about Rst-Snap. It surely 
falls r»ts. though house pet w<m"t touch it." Rats 
mry up and have no smell. Prices. 3Sc. 65c. Si .25. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

(iulley A Pnttit, p. R Blythe. 

December 31, 1Q23, in the home 
of Brother and Sister Conley near 
Beaver Lick, Ky. 

'Twas at the home of Conley's 

Where friends had gathered in, 
Ta watch the old year's closing 

And see the new begin; 
The Sleets and all the Taylors, 

The Delahunty's too, 
The Bakers and the Griffiths 

Made up the jolly crew. 



TERMS OP SALE 

All suras of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over $10.00 a credit 
of 9 months without interest will be given, purchaser to give note 
with approved security, payable at Union Deposit Bank, Uhmh., 
Kt., before removing property. 

P. P. NEAL. 

Sale to begin at 12 •'eleck. LUTE BRADFORD, And. 



'fi* *M e 



For Sale— Buff Rock eockerels— 

Although we are now well along Sf"'^"' Ed *» r Ay, ? r «, n ™™> 
r« rho „»«, „„.. moi .l _. W> K - u - o!6jan — pd 



into the new year — 1924, there are 
some who persist in writing it 
"1923." As long as a check writ- 
ten that way will draw, we don't 
care. 



FARM FOR RENT 

Farm of 135 acres will rent on the 

shares, 10 cows, tobacco and corn 

ground, nice new four room house 

From estimates made Kentucky's to good tenant. Also for sale 75 



„„„ ...«. uv ••.". liuuv.n.> O " »"- — — "•"•«" 

road fund for 1924, on the present ew c»- Apply to 



H. L. McGLASSON, . 

ol6jan— pd Hebron, Ky. 



basin of revenue and exclusive of 
Federal aid and contributions from 
counties on local projects, should b<- 
close to $ 5,000,000, , WANTED— To rent farm— will 

The Kentucky Legislature conven- ""I °" ^ ***" W """^ ""< " 

ed at Frankfort Monday and b K f™ ^ """^ ""V "? Uk * *^" 

doings are expected. The tax payer- * ted nCar Sch ° o1 and on "f 00 ' 1 



of the SUte will be kept on the ac- 
tion of every member during theii 
stay at the Capital. 



Our old friend, Charles B. Beall, 
of the Francesville neighborhood, 
paid us a visit Monday. When Char- 
ley comes he always brings a ray n, 
sunshine that makes a fellow fet I 
good wh.-n he is down in the mouth. 

Mr Muxie Sininger, of Ounpa 
dcr nci^hhorhood, formerly of nei , 
Manrhester, Adams county, Ohio 
was among those who braved the 
coh\ weather and attended court U i 
Monday. Me .ailed ni this office ant 
enrolled with ihe Raeordar Tamils 



road, one that will do for dairy farm 
and some good tobacco and coia 
land. 7 or 8 acres of tobacco and 20 
acres for corn. 

CHESTER HILL. 

Idlewild, Ky. 
o30jan4t — pd 

mtTIsion. 

There will be a meeting at the Mr. 
Stan chool house Friday, Jan 11th, 
at 1 o'clock for the purpose of con- 
Holldating our school with Florence. 
All persons Interested in this an 
mired to be present 

Klmer 1L Gaeken, 
Sub IHstrlct Trustee 



, The weather cold and claudy, 
But this we did not mind, 
. Inside was just like "Dixie," 
With every thing so fine; 
Good lights dispelled thr darkness, 

Good fires defied the cald, 
Goo'i eats filled up the empties 
As full as they could hold. 

T*e turkey fine and celery, 

With cranberries, dressing grea*„ 
And all th; other dishes 

The best cne ever ate; 
And then the good hereafters, 

Of candy cream and cake 
The finest "angel feeding 

That human hands could make. 

This put all in fire humor, 

~ From supper '.Wugh the n%ht 

The hours wer- rpent together, 

In greatest of delight; 
Until at me one surprised as 

By saying: "Watch Is o'er, 
For we an passing over 

1c Nneteen'twenty-four." 

We got ourselves together, 
Although the hour was late, 

We paused to tell how grateful 
We were to John and Kate; 



m 



fr •;»» In 

5jgfri : 



Aft "QHi 

*l%fc 6LVVINE 

A home hotel— comfortable, 
large, airy rooms. Clean and 
economical. A safe place for 
your wife or daughter. 



Low speed justice is not likely to 
d e v e l op int o high s pee d law enfurc c 
ment. 



Doing unto others as you would be 
done by, is good practice and it pay*, 
in the long run. 



Senator Borah proposes Co. outlaw 
war. But he'll have to do more than 
have a law passed. 



Mrs. CrandaJ (Iowa) T«1U How3fc w 
Stopped Chicken Losses 

-tajtaprin*. rats killed at) our baby chicks. Wiah 
rd known about Rat-Snap before. With just om 
haji package we killed i warms of rata. They went 
get tab rear's hatchea. ITlbet." Ral-bnae la-tuai- 
MUMl aad Mfla for 35c 65c. IL.25, 
Sold and suuuteed by 

Gullpy A Pettit. Rurtlngtun. Kv. 
1>. R. Blythe Burlington, Ky.' 



Business men who don't suspe.t 
their competitors of unfair practices 
are tre kind to tie to. 



Therc is more help for the felloe 
who knows nothing than for the 
fellow who knows it all. 



The eatherman may have fooled 
the fishing worm and the birds, but 
he couldn't keep Santa Claus away. 

This is the season of the year 
when there ars so many people who 
like chicken just as well as turkey 
anyway. 



NOTICE 

I will not be responsible for debts 
contracted by any person. 

LLOYD TANNER 

" Union, Ky. 




The new year is a good time t<- 

turn over that new leaf, but don't 

And wishtd ihem God's (rood blessinc write on it until you see how you 



In basket and in store, 
All hoping when life's over, 
To meet on Heaven's shore. 

J. M. Bsker, Walton, Ky 

For Sale Cow with calf by her 
anlr gtiod itock. Mrs. K. Starcher, 
I'l I'leaaant. Ilehron phone. 



are going to stand 
strain. 



up under tin 



I'eople want taxes reduced so they 

will have more money to buy mon 

automobiles and trasollne and wear 

out more r<«d«. which will maka 

' mart taxes 



TRUCKING 

OF ALL KINDS DONE BY 

Walter It. Huey 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Prices Reeseaable. G«r« Me a Trial. 

Ph-i». 41. X 

A combination church and apart- 
ment house lis being built in New 
York City What's the id. a t„ hel.i 
the church or th« apartment houae ' 



:. , yl^iili(a■.::' Bw^Bw^Bwi ■ 



Bw^Bw^Bw^wH -■!',' Bw^wH Bw^wi Bw^Bw^H 






PAGE 



BOONE C O U .J T 1 RECORDER 



'All obituaries, card of thanks and 
all other natter, aot new*, muit ba 
paid for at S cent* per line. 



Bullittsburg Baptst Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Pa*tor. 
Sunday School every Sunday at 
19.00 a. m. 

— Regular preaching services ol the 
ftnt and Third oundaya in 
month at 11:00 a. m. 



Methodist Episoopal Church. 

REV. P. C. GILLESPIE Patter 

Florence and Burlington Charge 
FLORENCE 

Finteaod Third Sundays 11 a. m. 

ttinJt School 9:3* a. m. 
(Mfcs Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 

Epwerth League every Sunday at 
6 p. m. 
(Miss Mamie Robinson, President) 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30. 
BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 10 

*. TO. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 
Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 
m. 



Petersburg Baptist Church. 

REV. O. J. CHASTAIN, Pa.tor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. in. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 
r. m. 

Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sunday II a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 



LINT'S FOR THE BABY 

Don 'I give baby anything but th:- 
breast the first year, unless your doc- 
tor advises. 

Dont give your baby sweets of any 
kind, ut> sugar, candy, syrup, cakes. 

Don't feed your baby green or raw 
fruits of any kind as peaches, ap- 1 Then Vackson"," next' "vm' Buren 
plea, bananas, whole orange, grapes ; W ho had the victory won 
plums, ete; ■ ; **- ' 

Don't let the buby sleep in the Next William Henry Harrison, 
bed with you. Put him in a box or Thon Tv l er . v »ce instead, , 
basket bed of his own. j Nl ' xt Po,K » tnen General Taylor 



OUR PkEbiDti-«Tii 
The first of all was Washington, 

The next was Adams, John, 
With Jelterson to follow 
Then Madison came on. 

Next came Monroe, then Adams, 
Exp-resident's fair son, 



In politics had led. 

Then Filmore, vice, promoted, 
And next in line was Pierce, 

He followed by Buchanan 
Then Lincoln's day so fierce. 



Don't let your baby suck his 
thumb or a pacifier or anything else, 
but his food. 

Don't nurse your baby when you 
are hot. It is likely to make him 
sick. 

Don't rock or hold your baby. ! H V h 1 ot in and ki " ed L hen Johnson, 
Leave him in bed, quietly. ' _. TU1 Grant the office filled, 

Don't let flies get on the baby ! „" HayM * nd next came Garfield 
They bring sickness. Cover him with I h °' to °' was shot and killed - 

mosquito bar. j Then Arthur him succeeded, 

Don't sit up when you nurse the j 'TU1 Cleveland was swept in, 
baby. Lie down. It makes your ' And next we had Ben Harrison, 
milk hetter for him. Then Cleveland once again. 

Don't lei your buby nurse every 
time he tries, leave him quietly in 
his led. 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. GEO. A. ROYER, Pa.tor. 
Sunday Jan. 13th. 

Hopeful H:30 a. m., Sunday School. 

Hopeful 10:30 a. m., Holy Commun- 
ion. 

Hopeful 7 p. m., Luther League. 

Hebron 9:30 a. m., Sunday School. 

Ebenezer 2:30 p. m., Regular Ser- 
vice. 
All cordially welcome to these se>- 

vices. 

Turlington Baptist Church 

REV. W. W ADAMS, Pa.tor. 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7 
jn. 

Bible School Sunday 10 a. 01. 

Preaching 11 a. m. Sermon 
Press Forward to the Mark." 

B. Y. P. U's 6 p. m. 

Preaching 7 p. m. 



Don't neglect to give him freshly 
boiled water several times a day be- 
tween feedings. - 

Don't allow baby to have a tast, 
of r.H the food which is prepared for 
the family. 

Don't expect baby to thrive when 
no lvguhu schedule is followed in 
Caring for him. 

Don't Aean baby before 9 months, 
i rdtes this is done at the advice of a 
physician. 

Don't ruire the baby after he a 



• „.%.,. A^O HOME CONVENTION 
CALLED JANUARY ?9 

Plans just announced by the Ag- 
ricultural College of State U'nlv er - 
sity, set tfae dates of the annual j 
Farm and Home Convention at Lex- 
ington, January 29, 30, 31 and Feb- 
ruary 1. A four day session of 
lectures, demonstrations and enter- j 
talnment extending ~from " Tuesday 1 
morning until Friday night will be 
held and arrangements are being 
made to bring nationally known ex- 
perts and scientists here to address 
the conference. Not only is it plan j 
ned to make this meeting a four day 
school for farmers and homemak- 
ers throughout Kentucky, but it wii] ' 
be a vacation where they may gaii 
new inspiration and- a new interest 
in agriculture. 

"This meeting is becoming of in- 
creasing importance to men and wc- 
men on the farm," said Dean Coovi 
er issuing the call for the conven 
tion, and at this time there is oppor- 
tunity to exchange views and to hear 
discussions that enable them to bet- 
ter meet the complexities of inodeii 






You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered by 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

ot 

Ertenjrrr Ky. 



McKinley next, but murdered, 
Then Roosevelt had sway, 
Next Taft and then came Wilson, ' farm life - Everyone needs opport„ i- 



\*^*^ 9 ^* * Mt ** M&&m&m 



Who had the darkes day 
And thus they came in order 

From Washington so fine, 
To Harding, dead, then Coolidge 

The twenty-ninth in line. 

J. M. BAKER 

Walton, Ky., R. D. 2. 

. PRANCE'S DEBT 



ity at least once a year to look at 
•flairs from a broad perpeetive, re 
lieved of more or less daily perplex. 
ities. The rarm ant) Home I 'onvBR- 
tion accomplishes this purpose by 
blending the practical and the inspir 
ational, the lauding of the -next • 
farm life and the developing of high 
or ideals tor the farm and home. 
"In the name of the faculty of the 
from acr., SB College of Agriculture and /L St' 



th,. «,i,r *h„ ( it-... ; ,T *-*"*«*« 01 Agriculture and chc- St.;.. TI 

tne wulei that trance is contemplat- u i the Experiment Rf»n„« V 



XSSCouRtEsYS-si: '^W^^ Joos 1 ability;-^ 

8 




ing the years 1922-23 many Ameri 

can farmers are seeking betterment j higher esteem today in A 

through the enact 



, the practical knowledge of 
She would have been held in much ! turc but those influences which te d 

i to make the farm and country more 



A 




Plenty of water now. 

Nine days of the new year hav. 
gone. 

Not many farmers are thru strip 
ping tobacco in this neighborhood. 



O 2 4 

We expect to make our services big- 
ger and better during the New Year. 
Come in and let us help you with 
. your business matters. 

Four per cent and taxes paid on de- 
posits. 

Capital and Surplus $150,000.00. 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 



axes - | I arms and homes. 

1 of theories, an J | debt-ridden ^L^Zult''^' l ' * ^ "" **"< «"> 



that they do not propose to go aolng ' work and forget their 
>.th .Mr. C 



attend the 
go « | lectures they wish to hear the con- 
world-old- | vention will be divided into four 



e cou i 



Quite a lot of sickness i 
ty-Bjrr.»tly bad colds. 

The frozen weather the past few- 
days is fine on the roads. 

Quite a lot of tobacco will be ready 
for the market in the' next few duys 

James Peeno, of Constance, was a 
business visitor to the Hub Saturday 




FARMERS ORGANIZE TO prepare it for their families and ar> 
BOOST NEW VEGETABLE forming the habit of providing it oc- 
casionally. 

Florida growers of the dasheen, s The dasheen is a vegetable similar 
new potato like vegetable introdui in food qualities to the potato, but 
ed into this country by plant explo ■•- being drier it contains about 50 per 
ers of the United States Department cent more actual food than an equal 
of Agriculture, have formed an as- weight of potatoes. It has a nutty 
sociation for the purpose of pn>- flavor and a mealiness which make 

a special 

ttle bread 

ther meats. 

baked, 

Saratoga \ 

ays. 



f.irmers, but for the great mass of 
people who nre dependent on them 
for an existence. Money has been 
loaned until it is doubtful if the 
debts can ever be paid 



THE NEW YEAR 

The New Year, with all of its im 
aginary problems, is upon us. 



veloping a demand for asheens coin- 



children" 
the largest assemblage of orphan 
a , Lun,D ** r Dealers and the cident with enlarging the production children in the world, situated at 

Agricultural Engineers will have le •• of the new vegetable. The depart- Alexandropol, Russian Armenia, n 
are* and demonstrations in the con- ment will cooperate with these grow the very shadow of Mt. Ararat, Miss 

Constance Sheltman, well known 



J!?!? 1 7° ^ in ^ C . neXt twe,V ' I s 1 tru « ion Uf modern fa,m building,; ers in their enterprise, 
erta.n^ , months depends entirely upon our | paling with the general roof of Although this new food crop, whic 




Russell House and wife, of Flor- 
ence, were business visitors to Bur- 
lington, last Saturday afternoon. 

It is stated that the month of De- 
cembtr, 1923, broke all former re- 
cords in the quantity of rainfall. 

It is claimed that very little good 
tobacco had been received at the 
Walton warehouse before the holi- 
days. 

S. B. Ryle, the Jersey cattle man, 
of Waterloo neighborhood, was trans 



e exeravagantly, drive expen- 
sive ears, live in fashionable and at- 
tractive houses and give every evi- 
dence of rolling in wealth, but they 
are judged by their neighbors to be 
shady in their manner of gaining n 
living. 

This raises the question in the 
mind of the average person — does 
wickedness pay? Do the wicked real- 
ly prosper? 

In the reasoning of some honest 
people, it may seem to, but in the 
long run, bales of bonds and wallets 



acting business in Burlington, la«*t 
Friday. 

Tobacco has been selling over the 
loose leaf floors at irom $3.00 to 
$35.00, an average of less than 20 
cents. 

Too many people in this country 
wearing out trouser seats, and n>t 
enough who are wearing out over- 
all knees. 

R. R. Wttham, rural mail carrier 
out of Petersburg, was among thoae 
doing business at the court house, 
last Saturday. 

Doa't forget the sale of personal 
property advertised by PP. Noal a. tation in the community for being"a 
h» residence near Hathaway for good citizen are built upon founda 

' tion* of stone that time can not 



of wealth do not represent happiness 
Though the possession of earthly 
riches may seem to indicate that the 
owner is happy, more than mere 
ownership of goods is required. 

The rewards that thislife offers 
are not measured by a bank account 
or the size of a safety deposit vault. 
They come in the smiles of the 
neighbors, the hearty handshake of 
a friend, the compliment for a tas.< 
well performed and the realization 
that you are respected member of 
the community in which you live. 

Riches, here today, may be gon l 
tommorrow. Such U the fickle way 
of fortune, but friends and a repu- 



are petty jealousies. The problems 
themselves are sufficient to occupy 
the minds of the best citizens, free 
of any bickering or quibbling. 

Co-operative effort is the onlv 
thing that will make our town a bei. 
ter place. Co-operative means work 



cussed by some of the leading auth- ed with faint praise by those having 17,000 children whom Kentucky peo- 

>nties in the United States. a slight acquaintance with it, ac- pie are helping support— orphan 

Men in charge at the College of cording to their fancies. In this re- wards of Near East Relief. "If every 



Agriculture of the University of Ken- spect it recalls the thorny path which Kentucky contributor could get 
tucky are working to make this .* the potato traveled in Europe before view of those children, if ei 
bigger and better convention than it attained general popularity. Sunday S-.-lu ••>! class which is i 



ever and 



one 

every 

sup- 

together I i t ** f "T breaking. While the potato had a ftw porting an crphan. could spend sa 

and placing iXft private Shi i ' reC ° rd *?*** P"*""*" StaUnch fri * nda ' v "» in th * b ^" ni "< h ° Ur " th:U "*> of * i,dren . as * » 

im -rue r>un' i-.c ' '* met with tremendous opposition billed. I am ^re cur subscriptionn 

IN THE CURIOSITY SHOP | from the medical profession as well would be doubled," Miss Sheltman 

In the middle ages men wore furs as from" the press. It was not until ^TO- 

in far greater profusion than ' th- after the French Faculty of Medi- Miss Sheltman probably will re- 

wo,nen - ^ ine in 1771, at the invitation of the main at home for some time to giva 

men aone can pull us out arsrer I Af l, i t H " "mudilei fi - eo/UMRly cd!'- ^ " "tr ail er . General of Fincncti, lu i -ume public taWry.sSes in the uiter- 

fields. It does not mean that the ry a grt ' at assortmt »t of bracelets ln v«?stigated the various groundless csi ot Um Bib*.- land orphans. 

and trinkets in their stomachs. 



tions. 

Results will come only when ev- 
ery class of citizens enters in to the 
spirit of community betterment. 

This does not mean that business 



next Saturday. 

At the taking of the last census 
there were only two states — Vermont 
and Newhampshire— without artifi- 
cial ice factorial. 

From reports the membership ir. 
the Burley Tobacco .Growers' Assoc 



w*nb 



i.way. 



Mr and Mrs. Everett Walton, who 
have been making their home in St. 
Louis. Mo., for many years, arc now 
with Mrs. Walton's mother, Mrs 
Lucy Cloud, out on the Belleview 



wfi'nAo 1- T*"* r »PJ dI y-n«»'»v , P ik f. where they expect to spend' 'the 
100,000 members up to date. winter. 

Bronse, the only tool metal known A ,. D ~ n . 

to our anc«ktorn of 8,000 Vers ag„ , .: rort * r > who resides about 

was Invented independently in th. , W °, * fro,n town - out on th- 

Near East and by the Peruvian In ,u ' 1 "f t «'" «»« Belleview pike, hs-, 
dians. bi, * n '"id up for several days with 

I lumbago. 

The city of Cape Town Im to ha 



" municipal radio broadcasting n 
tion and may prohibit similar cut. . 
prises by pnrate individuals fur Ifl 
years. 



Thire an- very few crops of to 
bar o in Hoone county that are free 
from house burn, hikI f,„„, ,,,,„ r u, 
the crop i- a v,,y inf.-rloi one nil .» 
<i (he Miitlt-i di-tn, l 



prr fessional men or the farmers c 
do it unaided. 

Overcoming the obstacles thut 
l'.»24 is bound to offer will be possi 
l-ly only by a united pull. 

So it's up to every loyal citizen t , 
pull his level best. 

RECENT INVENTIONS 

A patent has been granted in Aus- 
tralia for a trunk of the wardrob? 
type that can be used as a berth for 
infants on shipboard. 
' For traveling over snow, a mote: 
vehicle has been invented that ; s 
driven by revolving egg-shape "l 
drums covered by spiral flanges. 

A pneumatic life-saving raft that 
can be quickly inflated has been in- 
vented in England for the use of avi- 
ators flying over water. 

Pressing down the handle of a new 
brush that can be permanently -it- 
tachod to a typewriter causes it 'o 
clean all the type at once. 

A inventor has combined a chain 
bolt with a bell that serves u a bt.r- 
glar lam when a door on which the 
device is used is opened. 

For household heaters there has 
been invented an eleitricsllv ojierat 
ed stoker that supplies the c.,. ( | an.' 
r»«w « iht ashen, I'rMina current 

I'll. |,|| I ; |. r p„we> 

TJmhw wnr fewei lynehings Iti 

h i no . ouiparativr itatistle^ 
•in huNbund luurdera si. 



Charles Dickens was always an op- 
ponent of orphanages, believing in 
private homes f yr parentless chil- 
dren. 

Eskimos in the Canadian North- 
west have asked the Anglican Church 
to send missionaries to offset the 
demoralizing influence of vicious 
whites. 



charges against the potato, and the 
Pope and other illustrious men had 
assumed responsibility for its whole- 
someness, that the prejudice against 
this great Vegetable finally broke 
down. 

Experimental work has proved the 
value of the dasheen and the possibil- 
ity of producing it on a commercial 



MINTS COIN $114,575,080. 



Director Reports that 254,277,259 
Pieces Were Struck in 1923. 



Mints of the United States coined 
254,277,250 pieces of new money »f 

scale. Farmers *L1£*S^Z'ZZ£Z •*•"«**«•••* »' ^S, the 

high potential value since its introduc d,,eclor of tht> Uiint reported. 



The Sullnn tf Morocco never goes tion 
on the sea. Th 
lhat the Sultan a coul<i . and ^ QrWnt^ populatioi; ! 



llWe2eH thl '. ?r at P° w «'",«»' °«r IHP ^ties kept 
ot the world and it they wen to * when thev could get it. 

ErriLl'Vri, ^ ,hHt Su '»- U ' in *f high production and c 
ten loti iniglit happen. 



ci norocco never goes tion have kept on growing i m , o'" addition . the m ™* «truck off 

The reason for thus « it , and marketing U when Tv | 4 ^ J ^^^ «" Heru. 

n and the sea are con- could: and th.. ()vi. n »,i uoimlatior '■ ' ,nchuk ' d in th ^ United States coin- 

on ea£itlTK, f0r W* *«" -' 2<iK ' 250 ^ ,d 
Th!» ,k ! double ^'^ 50,031.000 silver do»- 
inus tn-,i ars 2,452,000 halt dollars 11076.. 

, £h ens ..dually incS^nS H SS iS2fS SS^ 

NrTT^r \ t)W «S«*« « 10 carloads four,! \J^ Qi> ^^ ^ ******* *"• 

NOTICE. ! lt s way to Northern markets each' 

All persons indebted to Thomas i season. However, some of thei»e for- 

Corcoran, deceased, will please come. ! ward-looking farmers, finding that 

forward and pay same. AH parsuia | **»•> could grow dasheens more sue- 

having claims against said estate will ccssfully than most other crops, de 

present same pro\en as the lavs r e- j tided the vegetable ought to be i„ 



quires. 



MICHAEL CORCORAN, 

E.MCUt. 



The Boone County Beard uf E«i 
i Ration im- i;t24 ifl tomposeii v 
W. M. Whits.. ii, Verona 
H II. Berkshire, f bi rg, 

Ji H. (|«>u.|, i ..ii-isrt . 

Al riogers, Uellei [< 

■' " W ilton, Carkon. 

W l! 'ohnsun, Ui,i 

The> were npj i,,. . 

I llltlge M nidu\ 

'•id Mondai 



troduced to our people more gener 
ally. They consequently formed in 
Nassau (\nmty, Floridu, a dashe,-, 
growers association two of the priu 
cipal objects u f which vara to mar- 
ket BteadUy wherever a demand «a- 

i.Hlful. 

>V ith the coopeiatw.H ..( .. 
of lo>al chain store-. um | \,-(i.., 
Ii'tendly InttresU in the n,-,n l, s ,,., 
of JacksonviUe thiM rarmers' o.gam 
•Ung with eonaiderabli 

M insklng th« da h.-.-n ., I,, 
billar t...«d piod »l m that 

"• "' e 1. |, (1 „ 



i(\ 



Not ail ;.<cpl«- with Hoiuan nosea 
came from Bot&e; not ull Afrkars 
came from Africa; not all of the 
Moekheadi cane from the woodland* 
iiot ail boneheads rame from ivorv 
— but ail of the coin of the realm 
v ernes frem the mint. 

U's said no one eaatd iind a "But" 
or an "If m Presidant Coolidge'* 
itieeaage to eoug r e t a. if he never us*-* 
*»• useful . .,, . ol - Kp#w . hf 

'••'« dm ■ In Utal . i Bjj, 

Ford iv for » 'oolulgv lor piestdent, 

"Inch might UmmI *vuut, who wanted 

nasty, to ■«.> that th,. ptrsident 

*»•' * m Uin 



■MH 



■■ 



.•AGE 

■■■— 



EIGHT 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 






Advocates 



i\% 



N PRIZE AWARDED! death almost won in this race 



•" World Court and Cooperation With League 
nil Mun brrshrp at Presertt^Spgseste ttrr . g ue Mem- 
bcrsnip Be Opened to All Nations and Provides for 
Development of International Law. 



The American Peace Award brought forth 22,165 plans 
and many thousands of letters. Since many of the plans were 
the composite win k of organizations, universities, etc., a single 
plan n *"te n »*epr< s' ,,,o d the views of hundred: or thousands of 
individuals. The content of these plans is therefore an index 
of the true feeling and judgment of hundreds of thousands of 
American citizens. 



These plans come from every group 
in American life. Some are obviously 
from lifelong students of history and 
international law. Some are from per- 
sons who have studied little, but who 
have themselves Been and felt the 
horror of war — or who are even now 
living out its tragedy. 

But among them all are these dom- 
inant currents: that, if war is hon- 
estly to be prevented, there must be 
a face-about on the part of the nations 
in their attitude toward it; that by 
some progressive agreement the man- 
ufacture and purchase of the muni- 
tions of war must be limited or stop- 
ped; that while no political mechan- 
ism alone will insure cooperation 
among the nations, there must be 
some machinery of cooperation if the 
will to cooperate is to bo made effec- 
tive; that mutual counsel among the 
nations is the real hope for bringing 
about the disavowal of war by the 
open avowal of its real causes and 
open discussion of them; and finally 
that there must be some means of 
defining, recording, interpreting and 
developing the law of nations. 

Statement of Jury of Award 

The Jury of Award realizes that 
there is no one approach to world 
peace, and that it is necessary tft rec- 
ognize not merely political but also 
psychological and economic factors. 



The only possible pathway to inter- 
national agreement with reference to 
these complicated and difficult fac- 
tors is through mutual counsel and 
cooperation which the plan selected 
contemplates. It is therefore the 
unanimous opinion of the Jury that 
of the 22,165 plans* -submitted, Plan 
Number 1469 is "the best practicable 
plan- by which the United States may 
co-operate with other nations to 
achieve and preserve the peace of the 
world." 

It Is the unanimous hope of the Jury 
that the first fruit of the mutual coun- 
sel and cooperation among the nations 
which will result from the adoption of 
the plan selected will be a general 
prohibition of the manufacture and 
sale of all materials of war. 

ELIHTJ ROOT. Chairman 
JAMES GUTHRIE HARBORD 
EDWARD M. HOUSE 
ELLEN' FITZ PENDLETON 
ROSCOE POUND 
WILLIAM ALLEN WHITE 
BRAND WHITLOCK* 




This photograph, caught of an engine and an automobile while both were 
going at high speed, shows that the auto driver who tries to bent the train 
to a crossing generally ends up in a hospital or undertaker's. Death was 
prevented from taking its usual toll when the motorist saw his error just in 
time. He swung his oar up a steep bank, almost overturning it, and was utile 
k» ■ ffltti fuat to avoid a crash. 



CONCRETE BLOCK 
FOR NEW GARAGE 



TROLLEY CAR CANNOT 
CHANGE ITS COURSE 



The Question to Be Voted Upon 
The substantial provisions which 
constitute the plan selected by the 
Jury of Award, and upon which the 
vote of the American people Is asked, 
are hereby submitted by the Policy 
Committee as follows: 



2. 



I. ENTER THE PERMANENT COURT 

That the United States adhere to the Permanent Court of Interna- 
tional Justice for the reasons and under the conditions stated by Secre- 
tary Hughes and President Harding in February, 1923. 

II. COOPERATE WITH THE LEAGUE OF NATIONS, WITHOUT 
FULL MEMBERSHIP AT PRESENT 
That without becoming a member of the League of Nations as at 
present constituted, the United States Government should extend its 
present cooperation with the League and propose participation in the 
work of its Assembly and Council under the following conditions and 
reservations ; 

Safeguarding of Monroe Doctrine 

1. The United States accepts the League of Nations as an instrument 
of mutual counsel, but it will assume no obligation to interfere 
with political questions of policy or internal administration of any 
foreign state. 

In uniting its efforts with those of other States for the preaer- 
vation of peace .and Jbe nromotion of the enmrnnn welfare, the 
United States insists upon the safeguarding of the Monroe Doc- 
trine and does not abandon its traditional attitude concerning 
American Independence of the Old World and does not consent to 
submit its long established policy concerning questions regarded 
by it as purely American to the recommendation or decision of 
other Powers. 

No Military or Economic Force 

That the only kind of compulsion which nations can freely engage 
to apply to each other in the name of Peace is that which arises 
from conference, from moral Judgment, from full publicity, and 
from the power of public opinion. 

The United States would assume no obligations under Article X 
in its present form, or under Article XVI in its present form in the 
Covenant, or in its amended form as now proposed, unless in any 
particular case Congress has authorised such action. 

The United States proposes that Articles X and XVI be either 
dropped altogether or so amended and changed as to eliminate 
any suggestion of a general agreement to use coercion for obtain- 
ing conformity to the pledges of the Covenant. 

No Obligations Under Versailles Treaty 

That the United States will accept no responsibilities under the 
Treaty of Versailles unless in any particular case Congress has 
authorized such action. 

League Open to All Nation* 

The United States Government proposes that Article I of the Cove- 
nant be oonetrued and applied, or, If necessary, redrafted, so that 
admission to the League shall be assured to any self-governing 
Bute that wishes to Join and that receives the favorable vote of 
two-thirds of ttka Assembly. 

Development of International Law 
As a condition of its participation In the work and counsels of the, 
league, the united states asks that the Assembly and Council oon- 
•ent— or obtain authority— to begin collaboration for the revision 
and development of international lew, employing for this purpose 
the aid of a commission of Jurists. This Commission would be 
directed to formulate anew existing rulea of the law of nations to 
reconcile divergent opinions, to consider pointa hitherto Inade- 
quately provided for but vital to the maintenance of international 
Justice, and in general to define the social rights and duties of 
States. The recommendations of the Commission would be pre- 
sented from time to time, in proper form for consideration, to the 
Assembly as to a recommending it not a law-making body.' 



Convenient, Economical, Firesafe 

and Suitable for All Classes 

of Structures. 

The amount of money invested In 
even the lowest priced automobile Jus- 
tifies a substantial garage that will 
give the required protection agulnst 
weather, theft and lire. 

With a garage on the home grounds 
the owner has his car always within 
reach and where he can use his spare 
time in keeping It cleun and in good 
running order. He also has a place 
to keep oil, spare tlreS'";,*.^ other cur 
supplies. With the car near the 
house there will be less danger from 
fire, tampering nnd pilfering as it Is 
always under the owner's eye. 
Suitable and Practical. 

Wherever possible the material used 
in tin' walls and roof of the garage 
should be the same as that of the 
house. Concrete block are suitable 
and practical for nil classes of garages j 
from the small building, such as is 
shown In the Illustration, to the types 
with separate rooms for several cars, 
such as are built for the accommoda- 
tion of car owners livinsj In apartment 
houses. The block may be finished in 
stuceo to hnV,.n,nize witii the house 
by the addition In cement mix of color 
to produce the desired tint. 

An essential feature of garage de- 
sign Is wide eaves or overhang, which 




Dangerous Practice to Follow 

Street Cars Too Closely — 

Keep Twelve Feet Away. 

(By K ll WIN GREER. President Qreer Col- 
lege uf Automotive Engineering. Chicago.) 

Accidents In which automobiles fig- 
ure with trolley cars are not the most 
uncommon on the list and there are 
several little points that if followed by 
the auto driver will lessen such acci- 
dents. One of the principal things to 
keep In mind is that a trolley car 
runs on tracks and consequently can- 
not change its course, so that it is up 
*•* the motor car pilot to watch out 
j for trolleys, rather than for the motor- 
I man to watch out for automobiles. 
I Every day we see autoinoWles 
l closely following street cars on the 
| rails. This Is a very dangerous prac- 
j tice, for the auto driver has no means 
of knowing what instant the niotor- 
! uinii may jam on his brakes, and in 
i such a case it Is almost Impossible to 
avoid a collision. Then there Is the 
j auto driver who fails to take into 
consideration the fact that trolley 
cars are likely to turn off at corners 
where tracks Intersect, and thus at 
times the motorist finds himself 
jammed between the trolley and the 
curb. Also the driver often fulls to 
Ajv't-o that when a street car turos 
uway from him on a curve the rear 
end is bound to swing out several feet 
beyond the trncks. 

To be safe a driver should always 
stop J'i.s uuto at least twelve feet be- 
hind a standing street car, and in no 
case should he take dangerous 
chances crowding in between a trolley 
and the curb. Also drivers should 
never attempt, to pass a street car 
moving In the same direction, on the 
left side, but this Is a practice that 
is common In many cities. 



BEWARE OF THE "ROAD LIFT" 



Author's Name Not to Be Revealed 
Until After Referendum 

Ik order that the vote may be taken 
solely upon the merits of the plan, 
the Policy Committee, with the ac- 
ouieseence of Mr. Bok, has decided 
not to disclose the authorship of the 
plan until after the referendum. The 
Meatlty Is unknown to the members 
•I the Jery of Award and the Policy 
Committee, except one delegated 
member 

JOHN W. DAVIS 

LBAJINED HAND 



WILLIAM H. JOHNSTON 
ESTHER EVERETT LAPH 

Member In Charge 
NATHAN L. MILLER 
MRS. GIFTORD. PINCHOT 
MRS. OODEN RJBID 
MRS. FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT 
HENRY L. STIMSON 
MELVILLE E. STONE 
MRS. PRANK A. VANDERLIP 
CORNELIUS N. BLISS, JR. 

Treeewrer 



Concrete Block Garage. 

serve as a protection to the owner 
from rain or dripping water when 
locking the doors during wet weather. 
A door at the side will be found con- 
venient for use when the car ia not 
to be taken out. 

Garages are often heated from the 
house plant, although there ore many 
small inexpensive garage heaters 
which give perfect satisfaction. A 
flue for separate heating in one of the 
floor plans may be easily included In 
the building. 

Special care should be given to the I w,se - tne man ln a car wno yields to a 
selection of the hardware for support- request for a ride* may find a gun at 
lng and operating the large movable ] h, « Dead ln 8DOrt order. The good Sa- 



W 



Do you approve the winning plan 

in tubttance ? ir *' «• x *» '*«/r.>#r »eeO 

Nuns 

(Pleas* prist; 

Address 

Uity ..4.... ., State 

Are you s roter? 

Mall Promptly to 

THE AMERICAN PEACE AWARD 
a** MAOieoN AvtNug. new von* citv 
Note. TMm !»•■ ralei la 



Yes □ 
No Q 



• • • • • o 



SOtS esareeelna. feller eaUlene are ..re 
see* aa>.m , n a •operate efcee*. 



•an, u-injjj 






doors. Doors that stick and bind are 
a nuisance and an extra $10 spent on 
good hardware will more tbun repay 
the owner ln comfort and convenience. 
Allow for Working Space. 

A garage should be built to allow 
for plenty of working space about the 
car, and even though the owner** car 
be of the smaller type, It Is good econ- 
omy to build a garage to accommodate 
a large car, thus anticipating future 
needs. 

Built of concrete block, finished ln 
stucco, a garage la practically perma- 
nent. Expense from repair*, painting. 
and insurance is reduced to a mini- 
mum and the car owner Is assured 
that his car has maximum protection. 



marltan may go to the hospital ln a 
barrel- It la the ugly necessity of city 
life to regard a stranger as a poten- 
tial enemy. It need not result ln dis- 
courtesy, but It says keep your guard 
up. Credulity often leads to an empty 
pocketbook and a black eye, or, in 
the case of a woman, to worse. 



FORD BATTERIES | 

$15.50" 

Guar*- ?d One xW, 



Don't fail to give us a trial, for wc have won- 
ful values for your money in all size batteries. 

Recharge Battery Repair 



Dempsey Motor Car Co., 

ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

Phone Erl. 70-L 



KC»'^5aK3K3K3IK3C53CSK:K:K;« 



C. Scott Chambers 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

OF 

SERVICE, TENDERNESS 
AMn AT.RRTNESS. 



for business people. 

for professional people, 
tor farmers. 

for every one who wants 
to be considered up to 
at this office date and going strong 

ENVELOPES, LETTERHEADS, NOTEHEADS, STATEMENTS 



SEE OUR 1924 

HUDSON & ESSEX MODELS 



All 



Essex are 6-Cylinder and built by the 
HUDSON MOTOR CAR CO. 



Prudence in City or Elsewhere Says 

That It Shall Neither Be Offered 

or Accepted. 

The lift on the road is an old act of 
kindness. Decent people ln settled or- 
derly places offered it because they 
were amiable and wanted to help an- 
other person along the way ; but pru- 
dence in a city, or elsewhere for that 
matter, says that it shall neither be 
offered nor accepted nowadays. 

A good deal of crime is on wheels, 
says the Chicago Tribune. Crim- 
inals are scouting the street and the 
country roads. The people they pick 
up are virtually h e lple ss. — C on tr a il - | . 



Hudson Sedan 2,020.00 

Hudson Coach 1,585.00 

Hudson Speedster 1,470.00 

Hudson 7 Passenger $1,525.00 

Essex Coach 6-Cjiinder 1 ,060.00 

Essex Touring 6-Cylinder 930.00 

Above prices are delivered. 

B. HUME, 

25 E. Fifth St., Cavington, Ky. 




STICKING OF CONE CLUTCH 



Usually the Result of Worn Facing— 

Mew Leather Mould Remedy 

the Trouble. 

The sticking of a cone clutch may 
be dne to a tendency of the dutch 
member to At too snugly ln the con* 
pert of the flywheel. This ia usually 
the result of worn facing of the clutch 
member, caused, tn turn, by burning 
tha facing through a habit of slipping 
the dutch. A new leather faring 
should remedy the trouble and a 
handy temporary solution Is to wedge 
broken piece* of a hack-aaw blade be- 
tween the facing tod the dutch mem 
bee at several points oa Its clrmmfee 
ones. Tula will often esoooth out a 
Ml rttctdag com dote*. 



TUBE REPAIR KIT ESSENTIAL 



One of the Moot Important Aeco*. 

eoriae for Every Motorist to 

Carry In His Machine. 

Probably one of the moat Important 
accessories for every motorist to have 
ln his car is a tube repair kit. It Is 
very much like life insurance, In that 
It la no good at all until needed. When 
It Is needed It la Indispensable. This 
fsd is particularly true when tiros 
are punctured many miles from any 
repair station. Considering the kit's 
small cost tire men say It Is ths 
chespest Insurance possible against 
country road delays and expense. 



AUTOMOBILE 
•» GOSSIP® 

A tiro with low sir pressure cre- 
ates friction and causes ths car te 

slow up 

e e a 

A rigid shaft will bind unless the 
alignment la perfect and provision la 
to pretest frame 



GAIIV" 



Cincinnati Daily Enquirer 



—AND— 



The Boone, County Recorder 



YOU CAN GET 



both lor $5.00 WEAR 



Send Your Subscriptions to the 

BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 

Burlington, Ky. 



eeeeeeeoeoeeooeooooooooooe 000«es»SOOO O »0000+OOo»o+ 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 



Don't l*e*M to R« 



ici All I »iw Ails ear I Hies ie»am*>.-?j| 
►♦•♦♦♦. »oooeooooeooeeoooooeoeoooe 



■SOS 



■"■<■ 



wmmm 



Vol. XXXXVI I I I 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 17, 1924 $1.50 Per *i ear 



No 15 



THE GOVERNOR WANTS BOND: 



WASHINGTON COMMENT. 

Most legislation of a revolutionary 
churacter; that is, of a kind greatly 
to change the established order, nec- 
esaaily goes through three stagt;. 
First, it is proposed, and rejected, 
proposed, and laughed to scorn again several gentlemen who have under - 



Governor Fields' first message to 
the Legislature is commendablv 
brief. And a brief characteriza- 
tion of it would be to say that it is 
an argument in favor of a $76,000,- 
ooo bond issue as blocked out by 



GONE TO HIS REWARD 



I J. J Stephent, Aged 78, Diet at The 

Home of Hi* Daughter In Law- 

enceburg, Ind. 



proposed, and again rejected. Next, 
it goes through the tducating stage, 
when the . forces behind it realizes 
mum only educating the whole peo- 
ple up to demanding the legislation 
will serve to make Congress pay at- 
tention. Third, comes the stage of 
waiting for Congressional action, of 
getting time before the legislative 
body to have the thing done which 
every one wants done. 

Th eEducation bill is -in the third 
stage. It is not laughed at any more ' 
The people want it. Educators want 
it. Organizations want it. Tht states 
want it. Practically every one wants 
it, except a few sellsh business or- 
ganisations which see in it a lessen- 
ing of the possibility for business to 
exploit sihools and the opposition, 
of course, of those -who oppose any 
extension of the public school idea. 

But these are flea-bites. Th* coun 
try, as a whole, has overwhelmingly 
shown that it wants the Education 
bill made into law, and the Educa- 
tion bjll as it was planned, not as 
some have wanted it amended, to in- 
clude welfare and the various "odds 
and ends" of legislation paternalism 
which the United States has hanging 
on to various departments in Wash- 
ington. 

The only suestion now is. .when 
will Congress give it time? Tax re- 
vision comes first, doubtless, but is 
there anything else before the Con- 
gress of more importance than this 
great measure which will so signal- 
ly and so vitally affect our school?, 
revivify them, rtendow them with 
new purpose and new vitality, and 
make possible, as never before, th,' 
full flowering of the public school 
idea? 



It is possible that history will re- 
cord the Bok Peace Prize offer at a 
potent force for peace, even if th? 
winning plan is never adopted. 

The donor of the prize has stated 
that should there be no further re 
suits, should no plan fit for use come 
forth, and the prize be given for 
no result, the prize would yet have 
accomplished its, purpose, in that it 
has focused the attention of millions 
of thinking Americans, and almost 
as many Europeans, upon the prob- 
lem of peace. Teach eoungh people 
to think 3t<?adily about peace and 
how to have it, and you get it, in 
■oiii*»T words. 

Who will be tiic philanthropist to 
come forwt-rd with a hundred thous- 
and do?lar or half million-dollar of- 
fer, for the best practicable plan to 
eliminate illiteracv. from the United 
States, and bring the subject of ed- 
ucation so powerfully, so potently, sj 
vividly before our national conscious- 
ness, that we will have the schools 
we ought to have, the government 
aid for education we ought to hav-i, 
the educational opportunities for al! 
our young people we ought to have? 

Mr. Bok has pointed the way. Ho 
has shown what a constructive imag- 
ination can do. He firtd the popu- 
lar vision with his fortune in a prize, 
and received perhaps, more free ad- 
vertising for the plan than ten times 
its total sum could have bought. 

What will work for peace will 
work for education! Some wealthy 
man with as much vision for the fu- 
ture, as it must be affected by edu- 
cation, as Mr. Bole has lor the fu- 
ture, as it mast be affected by peace 
or war can do something for this 
great natioVjt has not as yet been 
able to do" fV Itself— eement the 
national needs into a mighty unit 
which will forever sweep illiteracy 
from between the oceans! 



taken to specify how large the iss'ie 
should be and how the money is f j 
be expended — or rather for what 
purposes ii shall be expended. How, 
by what agencies, it is to be expend- 
ed, is another phase of the problem 
which these gentlemen have not an 
yet ogered to solve. And on its solu ! 
tion, it is hardly necessary to say, 
depends tht attitude which many 
Kentuckians will take on the ques 
tion. 

In developing .his argument the 
Governor marshals a series of facta 
which are not to be disputed, a ser- 
ies of conditions in deplorable neei 
of remedying. The State's educa- 
tional system should be improved. 
The Normal Schools, the University, 
should be better cared for. The pen 
al, corrective and charitable insti- 
tutions are in a physical state thflt 
is a disgrace to the Commonwealth. 
The public debt should be liquidated. 
The geological survey should be com- 
peted. The roads — everybody 
knows Kentucky is a "'detour State, ' 
and that it will take big money, and 
much besides the money, to get it 
out of the mud. All of this, the Gov- 
ernor argues, requires the $75,000,- 
000 bond issue. 

That tidy sum is neatly appor- 
tioned, according to schedule ar- 
ranged by the gentlemen who are 
sponsors for the bond plan— $50,- 
000,000 for roads and the remain- 
der divided between primary and 
high schools, white and colored nor- 
mal schools, the Institution for th'j 
Deaf and Dumb, the Institute for 
the Blind, the penal, corrective an.i 
charitable institutions, and the pul - 
lie debt. To these items have hten 
added $400,000 for a topographic 
survey «nd map and $350,000 for 
tuberculosis aarp^nHnms. How *nany., 
and what character of sanatoriurrs 
that sum is expected to provide for 
the entire State, is not explained. 

Nor is it explained what safe- 
guards for the proper expenditure 
of all this money are proposed, be- 
yond the Governor's suggestions of 
some innovations in the matter of 
the State Highway Commission. He 
thinks the Governor should sit with 
the Commission without a vote, and 
•he stresses the advantagts of creat- 
ing an Executive Secretary of the 
Commission, to devote all his time 
to his work at a salary of not less 
than $4,000. Hp also advises that 
the Commission be given power tc 
remove any official or employee cf 
the Highway Departent. 

Assuming that these recommenda- 
tions of the Governor be adopted, 
there are many who will wait to 
study the personnel of his complet- 
ed Highway Commission before mak- 
ing up their minds to intrust to.it 
the expenditure of $50,000,000. 
An excellent recommendation, 



John James Stephens, aged 7S 
years , one of the county's be3t 
known and highly esteemed citizen*, 
died at the home of his daughter, 
Mrs. L. H. Aylor, in Lawretneburg, 
Ind., with whom he had been mal 
ing his home since 1005, Wednesday 
Jan. 9th, 1924. 

J. J. Stephens was a son of John 
Q. and Lucy Ann Stephens, was born 
in East Bend, Sept., 2d, 1845. He 
was twice" married, his first wife was 
Agnes Ann Scott, to which tunion 
was born seven children, four hav- 
ing preceded him to the great be- 
yond. She. died July 25th, 190<>. 
He was again married May 4th, 190(3, 
to Mrs. Margaret Sullivan, who died 
March 5th, 1918, since which tim«> 
he made his hime with his daughter 
in Lawrenceburg. 

Surviving him are three children, 
Mrs. L. H. Aylor, of Lawrencebuij/, 
Ind., Mrs. J. Everett Ryle, of East 
Bend, and Lewis L. Stephtns, of 
Burlington, ten grandchildren, t\v > 
brothers, Zack and Lunsford, of Rab- 
bit Hash, and one half sister, Mr;. 
Creamer, of Osborn, Mo. 

For several years Mr. Stephens 
was a member of the Fiscal Court of 
Boone county, from Carlton pr< - 
cinct and was always faithful to ev- 
ery one. He was an industrious far- 
mer, a good citizen and neighbor, 
honest, upright and respected fo: 
his high moral character. 

Funeral services were held Friday, 
Jan. 11th, at K. of P. Hall, Rabbit 
Hash, with burial in the family 
grave yard. 



J. W. HOWE IS DEAD 



End Came Wednesday Night at Rn 
idence Here. 



CONQUERING THE AIR 

Has man really conqutred the air? 

That question arises in the winds 
of most of us after the finding of 
the wreck of the French super-diri- 
gible, Dixmude, on the coast of Sic- 
ily. 

Here was the perfected work o* 
man which was heralded as his tri- 
umph in the battle with the ai\ 
crushed as if it were a toy ballon. 

Proud officers had boasted of her 
prowess. She was the queen of !!:< .;. \y ::..«:•, one of Hamilton f \, 

upper regions, undisputed and unex j „ld eK t and most highly respected 

I citizens, passed away at his 



, LIFE OF SERVICE 

Is The Thought Of Thoae Who Knev 
And Loved Him. 



LOCA L HAPPENINGS 

c '"''' gentleman the other day, 
who had just secured his dog license 
for the year 1924. "I can't see wfcjrr 
some have to take out license aad 
others get by without doing so." It 
is the law abiding citizen who perjra- 
hij taxes and obeys the laws, thet 
keeps, out of trouble. If the other 
fellow wishes to disobey the law* 
and refrains from securing his li- 
cense lor hi-' ni; or on other thing* 
e iuiw -., it i.s he wh > 



Whilt there is a gseat glitter abou 
the stage life, yet tb» sirl who re- 
sists this and stick.; „v/ home life and 
?hero re 1 "^""- 1 frn-m tv^ glare of 
the footlights will "carve for hers'h 
a much happier career than can po-5- 
sible come to her through theatrical 
glamour. 

There is a great yearning thes.> 
days, the world seeming to be pleas- 
ure mad, but <the world that sits in 
the auditorium is prone to shut 6u» 
the girl who amuses from their cir- 
cles. The patrons of the theatre 
are willing to listen to the songs ye 
look at the pictures but there th.- 
intimacy ends; and the girl of tha 
stage seeks other and very . often I 

questionable companionshlpi^s 1 n^r-^ 4 ^ 2 hu ^ «« TO**** 
because she ha* l>y her own . choice 
of vocation divorced herself from he- 



celled 

But man-made as it was, the Dix- 
mude did not have the strength te 
combat successfully the elements 
which no human has ever controlled. 

Man may keep on perfecting t! > 
masterpieces of his brain. ■ He may 
continue to display his genius and 
his, resourcefulness in many lines St 
.endeavor, but there is a greater pow 
it than his — an unseen power — ov- 
er which he has r.o control. 

The Titantic, the majestic mistreat 
of the sea in her day, was splrnleri il 
by an iceberg. 

Va«t and impressive buildings h.r v 
been laid low by tornadoes. 

The pro. id empire of Japan was 
stripped of her glory and her mater- 
ial accumulations by a shaking of 
the earth. 

And innumerable world disaster:' 
crowd themselves upon' us to remind 
man that humbleness is still a virtue. 



122 Eaton Avenue, 



home, 
Jan, 9th, 192 , 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 



The century mark as the span of 
man's life will be the rule instead o< 
the exception within the next gener- 
ation if the rapid trides in prolong- 
ing Hie during the last decade are 
continued during the next 15 years. 
This fact is revealed in the repor' 
of the State Board of Health :iho\v 
ing that the average life in Ken- 
tucky has been increased fifteen 
years since l'.tO'J. 

Not only were the number or 
deaths in 1923--fv«i-r -1>y one-Vm:« 
than in IsiOD, but the number of 
births increased oiie-thir <1 during tii'e 
same period, thus insuring an in- 
crease in the State's man power. This 



at the age of eighty-one years. 

He was born December 8, 184", 
at Covington, Ky., but was left par- 
entless at the age of four years 
when both his father and mothc? 
passed away. J. W. Howe made hi.-- 
home with Mr. and Mrs. Philip Stoei 
*.zer, of near Covington who reared 
ind educated «hini a- their own child. 
He in eurn loved .him a.-- his own 
parents. 

At the early ajre of nineteen \ 

he began to teach school, in vchici 
profession he ednun led for eighteen 
years, lie had the distinction of be- 
ing the highest paid teacher i.i 
Boone county, Ky., at that tin:-. 
-Many of the older residents of tht 
county will remember vvtCh love ai. i 
respect their teacher, "Jimmii " 
Howe, who always had a word of 
commendation for those who 
well and who kindly administered 
proof to those who erred. 

Moved To Hamilton 
He retired from the teaching \ 
fession at the age of 37 years 
cause of his health, and purchased .< 
farm where he worked and lived f >,- 
five years. Then, becoming dissat's- 
fie<) with the educational facility, 
offered for his children, he sold h - 
form and moved to tne farm oil 
Heitzfttan'fi Hill, near Humilto ., 
which was known as the Wilson 
place. For fifteen years, until the 
oJd^j^'^il/ij.-n Mere maiv.i-i. he li\ ■ 



tli 



he- 



optimistic condition is attributed by 

the State Board of Health .o •."■ 

continual educational camppaign for 

the eradication of preventable »l;-- 

easeea and to the cooperation of 

health workers, health agencies, phy- 

j stcians and a receptive public. 

I The State's most important health 

I problem, according to the Stale 

| Board of Health, is in the i 

, tricts due to the fact that Kentucky 

of 



ed and worked there 

ed to Hamilton- and 
the dreg b usines s in 
tral aven ue. H 
and In came p 
estate !j.:si>;e. 



H( 



then 



tht 



i.- engaged 

Store 011 C'e' 1 .- 

later sold the. storo 

aged in the real 

being a chart':- 

Hamilton Real % - 



best friends. Even in the higher 
ranks of acting where women have 
won distinction because of their tal- 
ents and devotion to their art, the 
woman of the stage is very much 
alone. She shuns the association of 
the mere player and in turn is oft?n 
denied access to the fellowships of 
circles that look upon ber professi -*i 
with askance, even though its men 
made m accordance with Governor bers sit in the boxes and listen T> 
fields announcement a few days j the plays 
ago is that for the repeal of th" on, ■ ' , . A . , 

The girl whosticks to the home 
may never have her name emblazon- 
ed upon the billboards, but she will 
be far happier and useful than th.- 
girl who, restive under restrain., 
seesk the stage to get away from 
parental direction. 



DIVISION OF WAR PROFITS 



statute creating the office of Oil In 
specter. The Governor has declared 
that he will get behind this recom- 
mendation and do all he can to ob- 
tain its adoption. That, no doubt, 
will be necessary for its adption, 
for there will be trong opposition to 
the reform. 

Without such backing Executive 
messages are little more than con- 
ventional formalities. Gov. Fields has 
now had his say to the Legislature. 
If he is to have his Way he will havr> 
to get out and work for it. He mac 
rest assured there iwll be plenty of 
other workers at Frankfort during 
the sessiin of tht Legislature. Some 
of them have already arrived on the 
scene, as the old familia r names jr. 
the 



The soldiers' bonus question seems 
to have developed into a fight be- 
tween the American Legion and a 
number of war veterans who do not 
belong to the Legion. Back of the 
oppoait'on however, is the power and 
influence qdF Wall Street and men of 
larger incomes who are anxious to 
hat* sur-Uxes cut as per Mr. Mel- 
Ion's proposition. They /ear that if 
the bonus *. granted taxes win not orders, 
be reduced. Will Rogers, the cowboy 
philosopher, aptly recalls the tim« 
v-ben the- American people promis- 
ed the soldier boy everything in the 
hocse — even the cook stove If be 
would save the world for democ- 
•a J by acting as a target for Ger- 
man bullets. It wns admitted on the 
floor of the Senate that if there had 
been no nroftt in the war there 
would have been no war— and ii 
pulb hard to divide those profits 
with the boys who were forced to 
work for $1.26 per day and now 
claim a small equity in the profits. 
From their standpoint it is not a 
question of charity— it is a question 
of equity in law. 



ureas reports show. That they 
will work in the old familiar ways, 
for tht old familiar things, the Gov- 
ernor, like the rest of us, may take 
for granted.— Courier-Journal. 



"'I'm- State's older citizens will re- 
member when yellow fever and 
cholera were expected and necessary- 
plagues" the report continues. In 
1886, Louisville had the highest 
death rate from typhoid fever in 
the then civilized world. In 1923 it 
had one of the lowest. 

"During lt<23 more improved wat- 
er purification plants were installed 
than in any other five years of the 
State's history. Tuberculosis clinics 
were held in one-third of the coun- 
ties of the State and hundreds cf 
those suffering from this disea.v 
were taught how to keep it from 
spreading to other members of the 
family, particularly the children 



member oi 
tate Board. 

J. AY. Howe was well known and 
respected by all who had the privil- 
ege to meet him. He was a life-!o-<; 
member of the Church of Christ In 
which congregation he was an s.- 
tive worker, and while in health l;- 
seldom missed the Lord's Day Com- 
munion service. 

For nearly sixty years he was a 
member of the Masons and wa< pa-\ 
master of Boone Lodge, Florent -.«, 
Ky., the meetings of which were 
held in the old school house mailj 
famous by Uriah Lloyd's "String- 
town On the Pike." At the time of 
his death he was a member of Wash- 
ington Lodge N'o. 17, F. and A. M. 

He left to mourn his loss, the be- 
reaved widow, Amanda E. Howe, ri - 
children, William Howe, Mrs." An in 
Lamm, Mrs. Tillie H. Kernohan, of 
Hamilton; Frank M. Howe of Frank- 
lin, and James S. Howe of Columbia, 
S. C; twelve grand-children, three- 
great-grand children, and one si ster, 
Mattie J. Sutton, of Portland, Ore. 

His wife who survives him was 



Medical tests are required In 
France In order to get an sutomo- 
blls driver's license, tf they included 
the head, we'd be for trying it in 
this country. 



MARVELOUS RADIO DEVELOP 

MENT . 
During 1923 radio developme-t 
involved an expenditure of more tha% 
$50,000,000 for receiving appara- 
tus. Some 18 companies are man- 
ufacuring parts and cannot fill their 
orders. It is predicted that neyt 
year the volume of business will ex- 
ceed the talking machine. Radio 
quietly but steadily, is ececting a rev- 
olution in American social habits 
destined, it is said, to change them 
*s radically M the automobile and 
the "movies" have done. To jus: 
what extent radio is going to affe.-: 
old-time purveyors of entertainment 
—theaters, picture houses, lectures 
and concert givers— is not known. 
America now has 537 broadcasting 
stations, and it is estimated that 
there are more than 35,000,000 lis- 
teners. A census taken recently 
showed that half of these listeenr* 
preferred "jasa" and other "popu- 
lar" music. The commercial uses of 
the radio is now being developed 
and it may become as great a factor 
as the telegraph or telephone. 



It doesn't require a bright 
to keep still at the right time. 



mind 



r John Stewart, Dead 

Our beloved brother John Stew- 
art, of North Bend, Ohio, passed 
away the 4th of January, aged 66 
years and 10 days. He was born !a 
Boone county, Ky., in the year of 
1857. He was well known and liked 
by all who knew him. He was a lov- 
ing brother, true husband and a kind 
father. He was married in 1882 t . 
Nancy Louden. To t hem wa r« h« n , 
four children, two girls and tw j 
boys, one boy having died in infancy, 
Willie died in 1918, Mrs. Joe Spraui 
died in 1921 and Mrs. Lucy Welsh, 
of North Bend, who still survives 
and is the only child left to mourn 
his loss. He also leaves three sister?, 
four grand sons and other relatives 
to mourn his loss. 

Some 1 14 persons are still serving 
prison terms under the war "sedi- 
tion" laws, sentenced from seven 
different states. They are in prison 
beause of no criminal act other than 
their beliefs in the right of frej 
speech." A committee of liberals, com 
posed of nationally prominent men 
and women, has made an appeal to 
the governors of these states, to fol- 
low the example set by President 
Coolidge. 

Mrs. Barnhart, president of th- 
Spokane Womens Clubs, insists thai 
every year should be Leap Year, an 1 
that women should have ths> right to 
propose, marriage to the man slu 
loves at any time. According to tho 
testimony of many men, women are 
becoming more fearless and buV 
ness-like in this matter and the cm- 
torn promises to become 
within another generation 



Mr. and Mrs. Noah Surface, of t l.e 

Gunpowder neighborhood, who pass 

ed to the great beyond many years 



who furnish he v greatest number of ] Miss Amanda Surface, daughter of 
victims of this disease. 

"More than 500,000 persons wtr> 
inoculated against typhoid fever, th- 

vaccine for which was manufactured ago. The "wife and children 'hav 
in the State laboratory and distrib- 
uted free." 

Turing 1924 the goal of the State 
Board of Health is an anunal physi- 
cal examination of evevy man, wo 
man and child in the State for the 
purpose of detecting disease before 
its insiduous inroads have left their 
scars. To this end Dr. A. T. McCor- 



the sympathy of a host of frien 1* 
and relatives in this county. 



POULTRY MALTING. 



The Boone County Poultry Assoc- 
iation will meet at the court house, 
Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 1 o'clock. A? 
mac, secretary of the board is urg- | that time business will be consid-r- 



. w..icn the raw 
i is UJting a chance, and if haled int> 
, eourt for failure to comply with th« 
• aw* of the land, he alone will have 
to pay the penalty. The "same thing 
might be said about making .noon 
.-hine — sou e w ill try it, wh'le othe-2 
will not. 

i J. K. Sebrre, of the HrUhaway 
neighborhood, was a business visitor 

j to Burlington, last Thursday. Mr. 

[ Sebree had a sale of his persona! 

I property o.i the ;ird inst. He will 

i .iiiiit to Flor e nc e next week whet-? 
h ha- built a handsome new home 
and where :,e expects to make hi-i 

; home. A year or two ago Mr. Sebrcf* 
bought some property ut Florence on 
the Dixie Highway and owing to tho 
advance in real estate over there he 
has realized *a nice profit. 

J. O. Bonta from out on the Pet— 
ersbury i.ii^>, was in town early last 
Thursday morning, Jan. 10th, rt- 
ceiving c ongrat u l a tion s over the ar- 
rival oi' .. little. 21-pound "dish wasU- 
■"/' :;: his heme that morning. Ont 
i*4* n.ne chiid. en bom to Mr. anJ> 
.rii.-. Bonta this is the first girl, so of 
the eight boys each has a sister. On 
the mother's side, out of twtnty-fouir 
grand-children this is the first girl 
born. Mr. Bonta was wearing at 
smile thru the yard stick refused t> 
measure. Wahneeda Irene is her 
name. * 

In this issue will be found the fi- 
nancial statements- o) tbe,.tpn Boone 

county banks, and. "•; - Erlanger 

banks. £jj ;,V.«e banks show. 3... 
healthy growth. These banks from 
their reports, are in a splendid po- 
sition so take care of their army 
o' depositors, and besides they pay- 
taxes and four per cent on time de- 
posits, which is safe and very at- 
tractive to the people who want t*- 
keep their money as good cash, and 
v.her? tl.<\ cun ^et it when needed. 

Judge J. M. La- sing, who w 
spending ti>e wmter with his family 
at St. Petersburg, Fia., was in Bur- 
linton'two or three days last week, 
-twak+Hjt i: settlement with the Sheruf 
for the year 1923. Before he left fir. 
his .-southern home he reported that 
he to.md the county in good shape 
financially. The Judge and wife will- 
be back in old Boone when the "Rob- 
bins nest ^gain." 

It is claimed that there are plenty 
of .]ii.:i! and rabbits in the county to-« 
bring on another crop next season. . 
This \t d.c no doubt, to the factttat\ 
many o." the farmers had their lamL- , 
ported against hunting, or the poor- 
maiksman-hip of the hunters is re- 
sponsibic for this preservation of the 
game. 

The money derived from the do£ 
tax «,oi'< ir.to a fund to pay for 
sheep killed by dogs. If a man h-.». 
to pay taxes on a flock of shtep he 
owns, the fellow who owns a shee- 
kiliing dog ought to be willing t* 
pay a tax of $1.00, even if it has ta~ 
be killed if cauht killing beep. 

This is a fast age, and boys and 
young men are now spending more 
money in a day than, the old mio 
did in a month when he was a boy. 
Many of these young men will not 
work, and just how i>ey get their 
mor.ey is a mystery. 



g ti.ul ewry Kentuckian be exam- | ed which wuli be of interest to every 1 
and asks t'e , poultry raiser in the county 



ined on their birthday ana as 
physicians of the State to concen- 
trate their efforts on keeping the-'r 
patients well instead of limiting 
their practice to curing- ills tint 
already huve gripped 4he human 
frame. 
i The physical education act of 
I 1920, which was an accomplishment 

of the State Board df Health, 

quires that thirty minutes of' each 
day be devoted to health educa- 
tion in all the schools. Approximate- 
ly one-third of the children of the 
State underwent physical 
tions in 1923 and more 
were vaccinated nainst 
than in any previous year. This dis- 
ease which in 1900 cost more than 
all public health work did in 1923, 
has practically disappeared. Thous- 
ands of school children also were im- 
munized for life against diphtheria 
during the last year. 



geneii'i 



The geographical center of fore 
l(n-born population is in Allen coun 
ty, Indiana- twenty Villen fnrth 
west than In the 1910 census. 



Tie 
price of eggs for the dicerent breeds 
will be discussed and also new meth- 
ods of handling the Pullet Returi 
Plan, will be considered. , 

Mr. Leonurd Kite, President of the-! 
Association, asks that all purebnd ' 
poultry raisers in Boone county ac- 
tend this meeting, to help determine 
its business polices and make it , 
going profitable organzation. He ah*> 
invites all those that are interested 
in becoming purebred chicken rah-! 
ers during the next year. • 

examina- R. J. Matson, County Agricultural 
of theni i Agent, will discuss ihe "Value of* 

smallpox Purebred Povltry on the Farm." 



— Mr. and Mrs. Henry Quick, for- 
merly of the Hebron neighborhood,, 
but for many years residents of La- 
toia, haVe gone to Florida, wher- 
they will spend the winter amomr 
sunshine and flowers. 

The load limit law hs now in fore«v 
and it is akainst the law to haul over 
the roads in Boone county a load ex- 
ceeding in weight 10,000 pound*. 
This includes the weight of the truck 
and driver. 

The County Clerk has been kepc: 
busy issuing auto license for the ps*t 
two weeks, and up U date only 
about half of the owmers hare se- 
cured their 1924 tags- 



Notwithstanding Christ'* command 
to preach and heal, the Church of 
England has finally concluded that 
no sick person must look to a clergy- 
man to do what it is a physician's 
or surgeon's duty to do." The report 
i" general in character and adimts 

that the .subject is too numv ., 

and difficult for specific conclusions 



The parson who thinks the jranikf, 
er ISnarjition is Koing to the Hemul 
bOW wovy f U |. Kf . lH „„„,, lpf |(i . 
Wi o| un earlier day 



1 he lover* of movie picture show s 
will 1k> delighted next Friday aid 
Saturday nights ivhen Manager Po; 
tcr will present "The Mark of tu, 
Beast" by Thomas Dixo-, author of 
the "Berth of a Nation" at Burling- 
ton and Petersburg theatre. This 
great play will be preceded bv th< 
comedy, "Helpful Hogan." This is 
one of the shows you don't want i 
miss. 

Indorsement of the propo^-i 
changing of the date when pannlr. 
on unpaid State and county tsxei 
are due from December I t v March 
I, has been made by the county ><[ 
ficials of Christian county The 
changei t la claimed would give <\- 
funnetM in ihe agricultural coil 
of the State great relief 



Stripping tobacco i.s progressing 
very slowly in Boone county ant 
many growers will be kite in getting 
their crops ready for delivery. . 



■ 




G. W. Burkett, of Union, 
transacting business in Burlington. 
last Friday He called in to see tele- 
printers while in town. 

Loads exceeding 10,000 pooaiifc 
must not be hauled over the roosH 
in Boone County, Ky. A heavy Asm* 
is the penalty. 

Judging from divorces m hit/. 1 * 
places, I02M must ha«e been a pie*- 
peroua yem 



i he 

tbll BSMBSI 



>m been saach trapping 



-31 JHLU L.JkUH 



' ' JJI»U"IPW 



mmm 



rAGE 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



AW, WHAT'S THE USE 



By L. F. Van Zclm 

© Weuern Newspaper Union 



NOW WHAT ACE YOU 
r2AV(N6 ABOUT ? 



"TrtlS FLAPPER MiECE OF YoUGS, WIPING" 
UER (20U6E ALL OVEB Tv4E TOWEL'S 



Guilty Conscience 



MY BE*T CLIENT TfcwEL / 
WM05 HANDS AR£ TkOSE ? 




POOL MAKES SALE OF 

$15,000,000 AS MEMBER- 
SHIP GAINS 



Other Deal* Pending, says teegra n 
of President Stone to Directors 
964 Added to The Member- 
ship in week, Total 
Now is 99,187 



PETERSBURG. 

Master Boid Mahan has mumps. 

Mrs. Mattie Sleet is boarding witn 
Mrs. Eva Carver. 

Master Ralph Mason White hr.s 
■> bad case of mumps. 

Aunt Amanda Jarrell is in very 



PT. PLEASANT. 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Gross gave 
a surprise party Jan. 12th, 1924, for 

j their daughter Miss Elsie Elizabeth, 
in honor of her sixteenth birthday. 

I The following were present: Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred J. Gross, Mr. and Mrs 



i - » 

p< or health at this writing. j Geo. Brunner and Mrs. Addie Gaine.<, 

Aunt Louisa Berkshire has been in Misses Mary Lourn, Eethel Peeno, 

very poor health for some time. I Hazel Faulkner, Crescent Shannon, 



The Burley Tobacco Growers' C ■ 
operative Association has sold aboi . 
$15,000,000 worth of tobacco of th.: 
1922 and 1923 crops to several mai ■ 
ufacturers, according to the informa- 
tion contained in a telegram sent by 
President and General Manager Ja 
C. Sts-ne to the members of 
Board of Directors. 



1924 is surely giving us some win 
i er weather. Much cold and rain. 

Mr. Wood Sullivan, Sr., who ha-, 
been quite sick, is able to be out. 

Uncle Charlie Acra still dwells in 
our town. He keeps house on Fron' 
ctreer 
.^Dr. t'uhiielley of Bullittsville, \va< 



h->f m onr tr.vn Monday ts- rt<? aunt Fan 
r.te Snyder. 

Earl Smith and wife, of Burlinp-- 

SUBMITTEDv ton, spent last Sunday here with htr 

psister Mr. and Mrs. Albert Stephen/ 

To Kentucky Legislators — Shows In- 1 ^ Mr. and Mrs. James Snyder, of 

Flickertown, spent last Saturday 
with her parents, W. T. Evans and 



REVENUE TABLE 



crease For State Purposes. 



Frankfort, Ky., Jan. 14. — Ben 
Marshall, Secretary of the State Tax 
Commission completed a lengthy 
tabulation today, showing the rev- 
enue of each county for state pur- 
poses from 1917 to 1923. 

County revenue increased 160 3-10 
per cent between 1917 and 1923, 
state revenue for the same period 
56 1-10 per cent. 

In other words a $1 increase for 
state purposes and $3 increase of 
valuation for county purposes aro 
shown, Secretary Marshall said. 

The tabulation was placed upon 
desks of members of the General As- 
sembly. 

POULTRY INDUSTRY 

NEEDS EFFICIENCY 



That efficiency in production will 
he the key note of the Poultry Con- 
ference of the Farm and Home Con- 
tention to be held here January 29 
to Peb. 1, is the statement just is- 
sued by J. Holmes Martin, Poultry 
Department, Keuiui-Jfy Collf*?* of 
Agriculture. 

"Our reports show, '-ay a Prof. 
Maitin" that in those, flocks wh«rie 
records have been kept, where prop- 
er feeding has been introduced, and 
wfcer- culling has been used to rid 
the flock of boarder hens the pro- 
duction has been increased one hun- 
dred per cent over that held by the 
■tate at large. In otherr words, thi 
hen in the record flocks lays mor^ 
than twice as many eggs as the hen 
in the ordinary flock. That means 
not only a loss of feed, but also c 
loss of time spent in caring for poor 
hens and only poor production at any 
time. For the latter the cheapest 
feed is that ration which provides 
egg materials for the egg producing 
factory of a good hen ; hens will not 
lly half eggs." 

With this idea in view Prof. Mar- 
tin has helped bring noted speakers 
ki the poultry ndustry here for the 
nseewngs. Dr. O. B. Kent formerly 
ef the Cornell College of Agriculture 
«9*» "ho first proposed the present 
xfe of culling poultry will de- 
two lectures, The Feeding of 
eb and Growing Stock, and Sc- 
laatfen and Breeding for Egg Pro- 
tftiesnea; while A Breeding Program 
<fr Une Farm Flock and Succp.wfn) 



wife, of this place. 

E. A. Stott is keeping fresh milk 
and butter milk in bottles at his 
store here, and it is quite a conven- 
ience to people here. 

This is good weather on the coal 
man but not so good on the ice 
man, but we will see him later in 
that good old summer time. 

Rev. Chastain filled his appoint- 
Sncuv at the Pr?*'"* ch*ur^'r. -,an &«»>• 
day: Rev. Tanner also filled his ap 
pointgpent at the M. E. church. 

Mrs. vVi,! Crisler, of Lawrence- 
burg, spent irst Saturday and Sun- 
day heir with her mother and sister. 
Wm. Critler also spent Sunday her.». 

W. T. Evans and wife and Mr. and 

1 Mrs. Wilson White all motored to 

j Latonia Sunday and spent the day 

! with the former's son and family, J. 

S. Evans. 

At Latonia Christian church last 
Sunday there were 802 in the Sun- 
day school, and your scribe's son who 
teaches the Bible Class of men, had 
84 in hi" '•lass. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Keim gave a Siv 
o'clock dinner in honor of 



Mae Lawson, Edna, Virgie Gcorg'a 
I and Kathern Gross and Elizabeth and 
Knthryn Mahon. Messrs. Virgil Heist 
| Richard and Howard Vahlsing, Ju u 
tin Aylor, Ernest White, Edward, Eu- 
gene and George Hetzel, Robert 
J Barnes, Filmore and Clarence Ha'l, 
Elmo Jergens, Irvin Keaton, Perry 
j Pernell, ElZa Peeno, Chas. Herbstre:t 
! Chas. Faulkner, Robert, Harold an.i 
John Lloyd Brunner and Henry Vahl- 
sing. Refreshments of ice cream, cake 
and sandwiches were served at mid- 
night. She received many beautiful 
and useful presents. All enjoyed th» 
evening, and left at a late hour wish 
. ing her many more happy birthdays. 




Mrs. Emery Smith and son Miles 
Allien, spent Saturday and Sunday 
in Cincinnati. 

■ Mrs. Howard Tanner entertaine-1 
the C. W. B. M. at her home last 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. Adam Dolwick, Jr., went t< 
Bromley Monday to spend the daj 
..V., '..,.; ^.cr.t, M_. . Harry Robinson. 
Mr. and Mrs. Parker Hollis and 
son Roger Layman, spent last Sun- 
day with Mrs. Sallie Souther and son 
Gordon. 

A report came to friends and rel- 
atives here of Mr. Brice Mayhew's 
poor health at his home near Say- 
ler Park. 

Keeping warm has been the big. 
gest job since Christmas. Woodsaw- 
ings are the order of the day, and 
beautiful music filled the air last 
Thursday evening, played on a. wood 
saw by the famous Robert Alter. 

Miss Sarah E. Tanner accepted the 
position to teach the third grade in 
the Ludlow p^nol «.r,>d began her 
work last Thursday. The vacancy 
their was caused by ill health and resig- 
sons Weindel and Corel Keim and nation of the third grade teacher, 
two of their girl friends, Miss Fran- and Supt., Reynolds knowing Miss 
cis V. Berkshire and Miss Gene Mi! I Tanner's high standing as a high 
ler - j school student.t ogether with her 

See in the Lawrenceburg Press ' excellent grades from Independence 
where Mrs. Grubbs won the automc- 1 kst summer, selected her for the 
bile that the Press as giving away, j position and wrote her at once. We 
I much rather seen it come to Ken- 1 a11 wisn ner 8°od health and th2 
tucky, but the people here did not ' Des * °* success in this noble under 
bite, and the old Recorder was good | taking- 
enough for them. 



Coughs annoy 

unnecessarily 

Check those violent roughing spells 
that bring upon you unfavorable 
attention. Dr. King's New Dis- 
covery stops coughing quickly by 
gently stimulating the mucous 
membranes to throw off clogging 
secretions. It has a pleasant taste. 
All druggists. 

DR. KIINCj S new discovery 



FOR SALE ETC 






MONDAY IN FRANKFORT 



Mfetbods of Turkey Raising are sur- 
Milto of lectures by Homer W. Jack- 
Ms), Associate Editor of the Poultry 
JiamaaL In addition demonstrates 
•a practical feeding methods of th-. 
' %*** flock, judging for egg produt- 
«ran, what the Kentucky Poultry Ae- 
s*sjssrtion can do, and the Possibil 
Mm of Cooperative Marketing f 
■fstery Products, will be given by 
«*spnrhi associated with the College 
of Agriculture. 



tea days grace granted auto- 
owaen ever the State for 
•t at 1924 automobile license* 
Fields, expired at midnight 
TOtpfiay, Jan. 12th. 




■imere W. Gaines has been ap 

£sed a derk in the Auditor's of 
at Praakfort, under W,»R 
as tko newly elected Auditor. 



•WI 



one night last week, ruined 

of sheep belonging to W. P. 

of the Gunpowder neigh- 



r*;Jfe». Greer, Presiding Elder, of 
preached at the Burlipgton 
!. church, Monday night. ' 



it many of the children re 
■unity bar* the hooping 



ltt\ 



XT" 



Advocates of Governor William J. 
Fields' first recommendations to the 
Legislature, the $76,000,000 issue, 
appeared before the General Assemb- 
ly to appeal for speedy, concerted 
legislative action. 

The General Asembly reconven- 
ing afer a five-day recess, referred 
two contest cases to committees, and 
met a joint session to hear advocates 
of the bond issue. 

Speaker S. W. Adams named the 
House Rules Committee of 15, the 
most important committee in the 
House, ith Representative Frank L. 
Strange, Chairman. 

The Efficiency Co 



report on revenue and taxation with 
the Governor. 

State Auditor Shanks appointed 
E. J. Hooten, of Franklin, to be 
head of the Fine and Forfeitures De- 
partment 

The State Board of Education, 
composed of McHenry Rhoads, Sup- 
erintendent of Schools, Attorney 
General Frank C. Daugherty, 



GUNPOWDER 

About two inches of snow fell hert 
last Saturday night. 

Mrs. Sam Cummins spent Satur- 
day night and Sunday with Coving 
ton friends. 

P. J. Allen and wife of near Point 
Pleasant, broke bread with her 
parents, last Sunday. 

Mrs. J. W. Rouse has not improved 
any since our last report, and is 
gradually growing weaker. 

John Edgar, the little son of B. 
A. Rouse and wife, who we reported 
as having pneumonia, is improving 
and will soon be able to be out in n 
few days. 

As has been his custom for several 
years, Mr. C. Scott Chambers, the 



I either have in stock or will get 
'or you ANYTHING in HARDWARE 
JPV-NTS, OILS, ROOFINC ,>..„ 
SI'EClALtT'ES. Tell me what you 
want. Hope Conner, Florence, Ky. 

WANTED— Crop tenant, prefer a 
man with some help of his own. Ap- 
ply to C. O. Hempfling, Taylorsport, 
Ky. o24jan — 2t 



HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 



Good Show" 



y Admission 22 Cents, :-: Children 10 Cent* 

r. War Tax Included 



Vh^^.^x^^Ji^i^i^^i'K^x^ms^i-K^B't 



iJ*±J* 




. For Sale — Pair mules, will sell sin- 
gle or double, or will trade. Price 
right. H. E. White, Burlington, Kv., 
R. D. 2. It— pd 



Farm to Rent. Want to raise truck 
corn and tobacco. Mrs. Norra Stott, 
Petersburg, Ky. _J 



It pay* to she?. J-opk at our 
sleds, before you buy. Material,, de- 
sign and workmanship count long af- 
ter you buy. Price $10.00 and $23 f 
o. b. shop, Florence, Ky. Also sold 
by Aubrey Finn, Burlington, Ky., R. 
D. 1, and Walton Lumber Co*,, Wal- 
ton, Ky. CONNER & KRAUS, Flor- 
ence, Ky. 



- r ~ ; . w™.Mwy« mrp way 

popular undertaker, of Walton, was 

distributing some very beautiful cal- 
endars on our ridge, last week. 

Ben Perry Tanner and wife left 
for Basto, Fla., a few days since 
where they expect to make their fu- 
tire home. They have a host ef 
friends here who wish them great 
success in their new home. 

Mr. J. W. Howe, formerly of this 

in 



m — ~tt and 

fcrsma Guy Cromwell, Secretary of j neighborhood, died at this home 
State, conducted its first meeting Hamilton, Ohio, last Thursday the 
and heard reports from Dr. Charted 10th met. Mr. Howe was for severs! 
D. Lewis of Morehesd Normal years a prominent educator in this 
School, and Dr. John Carr, of Mur- 
ray Normal School. 

his death. 



cointy, and has a host of friends 
hor* who will be grieved to hear of 



For Sale— Barred Rock Cocerels. 



At the snausl business moating 



Pin. h»rri n „ d- j 4 V «. i« Al lD * annual business meeting 

Craddi KSl • I! i* y - ?"' B " C " , h-,d at H °^ M on the 7th *»*.. th* 

ConSwaSd T° n \ K7 :J- D ' ^ '•"•*»■«- o«eere were elected: K. 
Consolidated phone No. 255 j . Rouse, Chairman; J. S. Surface 

o24jan— pd B ld*r; B. A. Floyd Deacon; K. A. 

«s . _ir , ' Blankenbeker Deacon; R. F. Snyder 

Salesman wanted with automobile Trustee; H. F. Ut» Chorister; Harrv 
f^or country work. Quality line. Good Barlow Financial secretary; Rosa 

EJ: Tt*. cT °^.* Paint Com - Bir,ow organist; B. A. Floyd secre. 
pany, Dept., Sales, Cleveland, Ohio, tary; Raymond Beemon was award- 

o2 *J»n— pd |ed the office of Janitor for the en- 

« '^ I suing year. 

Crowns are going out of date in i ,— 

ILT'Ski w U i* he "°*'* ty folka oV, " rt Secretary Marshall, of the Stato 
here think th ey are rea l popular. , Tax Commission, Frankfort, report. 

_. a . t JT" *h«t out of forty-seven counties re- 

•™ n«« Kentucky distribute* ported on the 10gf aasesament. only 

17^,000 every three months to Con five shew increase* while forty-two 

federate pensioners. show decreasas. 



NOTICE — I have opened a barbel 
shop at Idlewild, and will do work 
every Saturday afternoon and night. 
Clint Eggleston, Burlington, Ky. 

LOST — On the road between Bu!- 
littsburg school house and Bullitts- 
ville church a green horse cover. Fin- 
der please notify Albert Willis, Bul- 
littsville, Ky. it 



l_Quicker Than Corn— 

Tuxedo Hog Ration, fed in a self feeder with corn, 
will put weight on your hogs quicker, and more 
economically, than will corn alone. 

Corn is fattening. But a hog has 
got to produce bone and muscle 
along with the fat, or he won't 
grow as fast as he should. 

Tuxedo Hog Ration contains 
those food elements which corn 
lacks, and which the hog needs. 

SOLD BY 



THE TUXEDO 

LINE OF FEEDS 

C«.r»-«-H« Sweets 
Dairy Tuxedo 

Tuiedo Hoc Ballon 

Tuxedo Pigeon Pood 

Tuxodo Baa Mauth 

Tuxedo Scratch 

Tuxedo Chick 

Tuxedo Buttermilk 

Starter an d Crowing 

Mash 

Taxado Developer 

etc. 



Early A Daniel, Covington, Ky 
Early A Dauiel, Erlanger, Ky 



SALESMEN for lubricating oils 
and paints. Excellent opportunit) 
Big returns. JED OIL AND PAINf 
CO., 3701 Burwell Ave., Cleveland, 
Ohio. it — pd 



TUXEDO 

HOC RATION 



For Sale — Laundry Queen Electric 
washer 82 volt, almost new. Lopper 
tub, aluminum wringer $150. Ma- 
chine for $75.00. H. R. Leldy, Flor 
ence, Ky. 

For Sale — Buffett dark oak, %\2. 
H. R. Leidy, Florence, Ky. 



For Sale — Eetey Organ in good 
condition. Mrs. Lewis L. Stephens, 
Burlington, Ky. it 



For Sale — Three pure bred Po- 
land China hoars ready for service. 
Thos. Haasley, Burlington, Ky., R. 
D. 1. It— pd 



WANTED— Man to raise three or 
four seres of tobacco. C. L. Cropper. 
Idlewild, Ky. 17Jan-tf 



For Sale — Two tons Timothy hay. 
R. B. Marshal, Burlington, Ky., R. 
D. 2. It— pd 

far Sale— No. 12 DeLaval Cream 
Separator — used a short time. Frod 
Morris, Burlington R. D. 2. 
It— pd 



For Sale— 80 shoaU, will weigh 
from 60 to 70 pounds each. Apply 
to Ray Botts, Burlington, Ky, R. D. 
2. 



WANTED— Good tenant er hired 
man to raise crop on shares, married 
man prefared, house and garden 
furnished. Apply to L A. Scott, De- 
von, Ky. Phone independence 1703. 
olfeb — «t pd 

LUST On the road between Lim- 
sburg and Florenee, last Thursday, 
pair eye glasses. Finder please re- 
turn to this eJRee. 



WANTED— To rent (arm— will 
rent on the share or money rest - 
prefer money rent, would like far. 
located near school and on got <) 
road, one that will do for dairy fan.. 
and some good tobacco and co 
land. 7 or 8 acres of tobacco and 2v 
acres for corn. 



Mrs. Oandatt (low.) Telia lh « JM 
Stopped Cnwaian Losses * 1 

"Last spsia*. rataUW all oca bale- dkfcSo W*** 
I'd kaown aboat R a t Saa p batata. Wlsa fa st eaa 
Ui»s pockace we killed snnases »tt. TW eajt 

-t this rear-. hstcbsa.rU bet' E at 3 —8 h*Ml 

- n teeJaodseHsfo.3Sc»65c,IIJ5. #> i 

Ssttaadt 1 »y _ J 

' iUey A Pettit. Hurlinpton. Ky. 
;*Ji R. Klythe Burlington, Ky. 



CHESTER HILL, 

Idlewild, Ky. 
o30jan4t — pd 



FARM FOR RENT 
Farm of 136 acres wilt rent on the 

shares, 10 sows, tobacco and corn 
ground, nice new four roem house 
to good tenant. Also lor sale 75 
ewes. Apply to 

H. L. McGLASSON, 
olOjan — pd Hebron, Ky. 



Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. I.) Put Up 
with Rata for Years 

"Team aso I sot tame tat poison, which nearly 
kitted ear ftae watch dot. We pat up with rats 
until a frVrad (old roe about Rat-Snap. It lurch/ 
HBsrsts. Ukmurh house pel* won't touch it ." Rats 
dry ap anrHsav* no smell Prices. 35e. oSc. IIJS. 
SoW sad fuaiaatacd by 

Gfoltey A Pettit, t). R. Blythe. 

TURKEYS FOR RALE 

Tome #• and $12; PulUts $4 and 
*»; Cioiness, 76c. Mrs. B. K. Ayler, 
Burlington, Ky. 



NOTICE 

ill not be responsible lor dehrta 
t ted by any person. 

LLOYD TANKER 

Unjew, Ky. 




For Sale — Buff Rock cockerels — 
Baker strain. Edgar Aylor, Flbrenoe, 
Ky., R. D. olsjair— pd 

NOTUHB— Sea M, B. Rise, Rabbit 
Hash, Ky., far prices on Feed ears 
and Ford Tractors. 



TRUCKING 

OF ALL KINDS DONE BY 

Walter R. Huey 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Priaes Reasonable. Give Me a Ti ml. 

Phone 416-X 



Aa open winter makes a 
coal sin, at any rats. 



erased 



NOTICE. 

^All parsons indebted te Tboaias 
oreoran, deseased, w»ll pkafte cease 
irwtwd and pay snme. All persei* 
having claims aguinst said estate wil. 
present nana proven aa the law re- 
quires. 

MICHARL CORWKAN. 
bfterufer 



-- — 



kill 



■ 4».»J! 



•P" 



PAGE 



BOONE COUUTY RECORDER 






I 



All oUtBMM, card of thanks and 



all athar 



thai- — ^*Mi if 1 
for at 8 cadlff 



ot nam, must 



liat. 



BuUittfUurg Baptist Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Pastor. 
Sunday School orery Sunday at 
lt.00a.m. ' 

Regular preaching a ewau— i 
fin* and Thi»d bandars in 
at l)«Oa m. 




.31 



HOPEFUL 

Miss Rosa Barlow is on the sick 



CONSTANCE. 

The river has gone down and peo 
:e can get to Covington now. 

jHarry Klaserner, of Welch, Vu., 3 Missea NelIie and Ora Robbins 
is the guest of his parents here spent Friday with Miss Rosa Barlow 



Utthodift Episcopal Church. 

REV. P. G. GILLESPIE Pastor 

Florence aad Barling too Cnargo 

FLORENCE 

FirsfcJind Third Sundays 11 a. m. 

SundST School 9:30 a. m. 
(Miss Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 

Bpworth League every Sunday at 
6 p. m. 
(Miss Mamie Robinson, President) 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:30. 

BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 10 

a. m. 

(Mrs. Edna Ed dins, Supt) 
Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 
m. 



Pt ter sburg Baptist Churoh. 

REV. O. J. CHASTAIN, Pastor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 
a. n». 

Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sunday 11 a. m., and 7i30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 

Boom Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. GEO. A. ROYER, Pastor. 
Sunday Jan. 13th. 

Hopeful 9:30 a. m., Sunday School. 
Hopeful 7 p. m., Luther League. 
Hebron 10:30 a. m., Regular service 
Hebron 2 p. m, Sunday School. 

All cordially welcome to these ser- 
vices. 



New Year's week. 

It is reported that Sherman Pen- 
mo, son of James Peeno, and Irene 
Arnold, daughter of Walter Arnold, V 
j of near Burlington, are married. W<r^' 
wish them much joy. v' 

The funeral of Charles Kelse wa* -g { 
held Saturday morning, Jan. 5th who 
died very suddenly of heart failure. 
He united with the church here dur- 
ing the protracted meeting. The se 
vices were conducted by Bro. Lati- 
mer. His wife has the sympathy of 
this community in her hour of sor- 
row, He was buried in the cemetery 
here. One by one they cross the sil- 
ent river to the other shore. 

The Ladies Aid was reorganized 
with fifteen members. Mrs. Dolwick 
is president, Mrs. Fannie Kenyon is 
vice-president, Mrs. Sophia Zimme-r 
is financial secretary and Mrs. Fred 
Prable is recording secretary. They 
organized at the home of Mrs. Poo- 
ham, and their first meeting will be 
at the home of Mrs. raimie Kenyon. 
The church is marching on. They 
have organized a Men's Brotherhood 
and are going to organize a boys 
and girls club. 



Jan. 5th. She died at her home on 
Pattison street Riversklo. The sec- 
vices were conducted by the Meth- 
odist preacher of Riverside. Mrs. 
Fox was born and reared and mar- 
ried in Stringtown. She was tl... 
daughter of Thomas Hankins and 
wife. She leaves to mourn her loss 
her aged husband, several children 
and many other friends and rela- 
tives. Henry Fox is a Civil War 
veteran and is 83 years of age. So 
they cross the river one by one. 



Mrs. 



Mrs. Emma Acra was the guesi 
Friday afternoon of Mrs. Jas. Gar- 
dkner. 

yMr. and Mrs. Will Snyder spent 
Sunday with their grandparents, Jno. 
~^,ouse. 
r Mrs. Annie Beerngfc ' * — -"lesU 
Sunday, Harry Tinn ana lamuy, of 
Hebron. 

Mrs. Ella Barlow was the guest 
6ne day last week of Mrs. Laura 
Beemon. 

Tommie Easton has rented the 
Ben Tanner farm and will move to 
it soon. 

Lula and Thelma, little daughter.! 
of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Rc k bins, have 
whooping cough. 

Mrs. Howard Kelly has as her 
guest one day the past week, Mr*. 
James Kelly, of Burlington. 

Dogs made a raid on W. P. Bee- 
mon's sheep last week, killing two 
and doing considerable damage to 
the others. 

Miss Minnie Beemon has returned 
home after a delightful week-end 
visit with Miss Mollie Lummel, of 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. W. P. Beemon and Miss Ora 
Robbins went to Burlington Satur 



The funeral of Mrs. Anna EliSa day to see Mrs. Beemon's little 
Fox, wife of Henry Fox, who dieoS grandson Albert William Weave.-, 
Jan. 7th, aged 75 years, was held at V ho has been quite ill. 
the church here Saturday afternoon. J Mr - and Mrs. Will Snyder, Mr 

I.. CiL CJ1._ J!_J -J. I 1 ar\A M -c T r> A %I A f 



list. 



and Mrs. L. C. Acra, Mrs. Annie 
Beemon, Miss Minnie Beemon, Jas. 
Clinton and Shelby Beemon and 
Owen Ross were pleasantly enter- 
tained Wednesday evening by Mr. 
. _. *j. ianner. 

HEBRON. 

Mr. Elijah Tanner was on the 
sick list last week. 

Mrs. John Clore, who has been ill 
for several weeks, is improving. 
Church services Sunday morning 
WTTHyrE" at 10:30 ' Sun day school at 2 p. m. 

HI) ML v Mrs. Chester Anderson, our tele- 

Eliza Roberts is on the sic!; , J mone operator, has been very sick 

Suice last week. 



BurlingtOll Baptist ChUrOh \J There will be church at South 3l3r. Frank Crigler, of Ft, Mitchell, 
Prayer meeting Saturday 7 p. r.\. ^ork Sunday — both morning ani. presented Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Gordon 
— L. R. McNeely Leader. evening. Snth a nice radio set for a Christmas 

Bible School Sunday 10 a. m. *■* Katie and Howard Stahl spent PrWnt. 

Preaching 11a. m. Sermon — "TheN several days last week with Mary —-Mr. and Mrs. Liston Hempflimr 
Common Life." ^W..,',;,,. and son were guests ov »«*,. parents, 

Young People's Work 6 p. m. ^Harvey Scott, of Covington, ' .s Mr - and Mrs. Wm. McGlasson, last 

visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. ! Sunday 
Joe Scott. 

Several from here attended the 7" 
shower and dance at W. W. Scott s*J? r 



Preaching 7 p. m. Sermon— "Tha 
Ministry of the Word." 

REV. W. W ADAMS, Pastor. 



Mrs. Agnes Clore is quite sick. 

Nearly everybody has a bad cold. 

Ed. Rice is able to be up and about 
after quite a' sick spell. 

Dr. and Mrs. E. W. Duncan were 
in Burlington Sunday. 

Young lambs have made their ap- 
pearance in some localities. 

L. L. Eddins does not improvers. 
fast as his many friends wish. 

Mrs. Lavina Kirkpatrick has been 
00 the sick list for several days. 

Dolpha Sebree and famly spent 
Sunday with relatives at Belleview. 

March has five pay days, but that's 
the month the income tax falls due. 

Albert Weaver, who has been quite 
sick for the past week, is improving 
slowly. 

Last week furnished all kinds of 
weather — cold, sunshine, rain, sleet 
and snow. 

Newton Sullivan, Jr., who was 
quite sick last week, is able to he 
out again. 

Miss Pink Cowen was confined t 
her bed Beveral days the past week, 
with grippe. 

Glen Crisler shipped two truck 
loads of cattle to the market on<? 
day last week. 

John Q. and Hugh Stephens, of 
Rabbit Hash precinct, were business 
visitors to Burlington, Monday. 

James Shepherd and wife, out on 
route one, gave the young folks a 
dance last Saturday night. All had a 
good time. 

O u t u f n e aily $200,000,000 — 6T 

gold produced in South Africa, $140,- 
000,000 are used in wages, stores, 
taxes and living purposes. 

Rev. Gillespie preached at the M. 
E. church last Sunday morning and* 
evening. At the night services Rev. 
Greer, Presiding Elder, was present. 

Mrs. Rosa Johnson, of Cincinnati, 
who has been tht guest of Mr. anj 
Mrs. J. O. Bonta, for several days, 
returned to her home last Saturday 
afternoon. 

Preaching at the Burlington Bap- 
tist church last Sunday morning and 
evening. At the morning serviv.es 
Mrs, L. T. Uta united with the 
church by letter. 

John Bolen and Perry Louden, of 
Petersburg, were Monday visitors to 
Burlington. While in town John 
called at this o ce and gave ua a 
few of the latest "smilers." 

K'orris Berkshire and Walton Berk- 
shire, of Petersburg, passed through 
Burlington, Monday morning en- 
route U the mountain 1 - of North 
Hurolina on an indefinite hunting ex- 
pedition. 

Miss Ruth Kelly left Sunday ?<>, 
Grayson county, where she has been 
«*mployt«d to taach in the rounty 
High sohool. Prof. SkUlman is the 
principal of that school and prevail- 
ed on her to accept the position. 



THE UNIVERSAL CAR 

Looking Ahead 

LAST Spring a total of 35OJ0OO people were disappointed in 
4 ■ not being able to obtain deliveries of Ford Cars and Trucks, 
as orders were placed faster than cars could be produced. 

The demand for Ford Cars and Trucka this Spring will, accord- 
ing to all indications, be far greater than last Spring. 

Winter buying has been increasing at a greater rate than ever 

before. 

Actual retail deliveries the past 60 days 
totaled 308,170 Ford Cars and Trucks, an 
increase of 1,961 a day over a year ago. 

Over 200,000 people have already ordered Ford products on 
our purchase plan, the majority of whom will take delivery in 
the Spring. 

The above facts are given with the suggestion that you list your 
order promptly with a Ford dealer if you contemplate the pur- 
chase of a Ford. Car or Truck for use this Spring or Summer and 
wish to avoid delay in delivery. 

"--^^V^ Detroit, Michigan W 



You need not pay cash lor your or. You can arrange to make a small < 
down, taking care of the balance in easy payments. Or, you can buy on tha 
Ford Weekly Purchase Plan. This puts you on the p t eleiied order 
list and insures delivery of your car st a time to be determined by youxaelf. 

C. W. MYERS MOTOR CO., Florence, Ky. 
Boone Co. Motor Co., Union, Ky., S. C. Hicks, Mgr. 



WtiM 



Monday night. 

The many friends here were sur 
prised to hear of the wedding of 
Miss Dela Brock and Ross Scitt. 
They were quietly married last Sat- 
urday at Warsaw. Their many friends 
here wish them much joy through 
their married life. 



The little son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allen Goodridge, who has been sick 
several weeks, continues about 
same. 
J Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rouse ai>d 



THE BIG FARMERS' AND 

BUSINESS MEN'S BANQUET 



At a recent meeting of the Dear- . 
born County Farmers' Federation, >jt secured, 
was decided to hold the Annual Far>. 
mers' and Business Men's Banquet \ 
at Lawrenceburg this year, if proper \ 
arrangements could be made at thff 
place. Consequently a Banquet com 
mittee of the organization was ap- 
pointed to carry out the plans. 

This Committee met with the di- 
rectors of the Lawrenceburg Kiwanis 
Club Saturday night to present th:; 
requirements of the banquet, at 
which time the directors gladly de- 
cided ito meet the requirements and 
to give their hearty co-operation in 
making it a success. 

The Banquet will probably be 
held at the Liberty Theatre on the 
29th of February. The defiinite date 
and place will be announced in the 
near future. We are planning on an 
excellent program with an address 
by a speaker of national repute. 



Boone county was represented hy 
J. C. Bedinger, Dr. E. L. Glacken, 
J. G. Renaker, B. C. Gaines, A. B. 
Renaker, Geo. Penn, B. H. Riley, 
Chas. Riley, Henry Gatje, Frank 
Hossman, Jr., Earl Aylor and Elmer 
Goodridge at the Good Roads meet- 
ing held in F rankfort Jaat^Mnnday 
The sentiment of those present fa- 
vored the $50,000,000 road bond is- 
sue, and that the $25,000,000 recom- 
mended by the Governor should not 
be coupled w th nor made a part of 
the road bond question. The differ- 
ent bond issues shou'd be suhmtited 
to the vo'CiS in v.u'n form t^at thiy 
can intelligently c/>«t their vo-r fa 
favor of or i,gain:t any one -f the 
different propositions for which the 
bonds are to be issued. 



.... , — — m — -^- '""vi'ci um tii woo coverea witn s 

and death of our s,ster and aunt> ^cur-inch snow here last Sundaj 
Mrs. Martha Allen. \orning. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Hankinson, Niea?s k-Viiiffnr 
and Nephews 



NOTICE 

All persons having claims agai..„ 
the estate of Eugenia Blythe, de 
ceased, will present same to me prov 
en as the law requires. All person - 
owing said estate will settle same 
at once. 

A. B. RENAKER, 

Executor 

Dr. R. E. Ryle, of Walton, report 
ed a case of smallpox in the camp 
cars st Rlchwood. About twenty oth- 
er negroes have been exposed. 



children have been visiting Mr. and 
Mrs. F. H. Rouse, of Burlington, 
since last week. 

Robert, little son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. England, who had whooping 
cough and pneumonia, was very ill 
last week, and at last reports he 
was improving. 

Mrs. Lucy Newman, who was teach 
ing the Rucker school near here re- 
signed and Mrs. Jessie Hossman is 
teaching ntil ano Liter Leacher can be 



Taylorsport 

Mrs. Anna Godridge is the gue;t 
of her son and family, Mr. and Mrs. 

hman Goodridge. 

Mrs. Walter Sprague spent Wed- 
nesday with her mother, Mrs. Jennie 
Brose, of Riverside. 

Rev. Johnson, a Christian minister 
of the Cincinnati Bible Institute, 
preaches at Taylorsport church ev- 
ery Sunday at 7 p. m. On Jan. 20th 
his sermon will be on the Ku Klux 
Klan. Keep this date open and 
make a special effort to be presen:. 



(Too Late for Last Week.) 

There are several cases of whoop- 
ing cough here. 

Mrs. Anna Goodridge entertained 
the Card Club last Thursday after- 
noon. 

A dance and watch meeting was 
given at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Wm. Kruse Dec. 31st. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sprague 
spent New Year's with Mr. and Mrs. 
H. F. Siegler, of Price Hill. 

Mrs. John Grim entertained with 
a b i rth da y - party Saturday nighfc- 
enjoyable evening was had by all. 

The many friends of Rev. Rick- 
etts will be glad to learn he will bo 
able to leave the hospital the coming 
week for his home in Bromley. 



CARD OF THANKS 

We wish to express our sincere ap ■ 
preciation and thanks to each arid 
everyone for their assistance and . 

kindness shown us during the illness Mother Earth was covered with a 
ana death of our .mfor «n/4 <,,,.,* n t • > _ 



VERONA. 

Health of the community genera!- 
Iy gooo. 

Farmers are busy stripping and 
delivering their tobacco to the pool. 

Several persons of this place at- 
tended fiscal court at Burlington, last 
week. 

The Graded School here Is pro- 
gressing nicely with good attend- 
ance 



a^s k-JClifford Myers, who has a poai- 
> th 



tion in Covington, visited his par- 



ents last Sunday 



Miss Editha Ransom, of Coving- 
ton, visited her mother, Mrs. Mattie 
Ransom, last Sunday. 

O. K. Whitson and wife are spend- 
ing several weeks with their daugh- 
ter, Mrs. Blanche ('off man, of Wal 
ton. 



A man has been lynched in Italy, 
There's one at least, that can't be 
blamed on the southern sUUn. 



Thar* is quite a lot of sickness ov- 
er the county. 



JiPTtfS FOLLOW SAWMILL 

FOR PRIFIT 

Profitable use of cut-over land i3 
one of the problems of any section 
in which much lumbering is don?. 
F. M. Harrison, of the Sunset Hill 
Farms, Lake, Miss., with the advice 
of the county agricultural extension 
agent, has tried poultry raising as a 
solution of the problem both for his 
own and for his neighbors' informa- 
tion. Starting in, 1920 with 1 male 
bird and 5 hens of high-producing 
strains, he had by the next spring 
about 50 pullets. The following year 
his flock numbered 150 pullets and 
by January, 1923, it had increased 
to 400 pullets. For the eight month* 
from January to September, 1923, 
Mr. Harrison realized from his flock 
a profit of $400 in addition to the 
value of the birds, which, by Septem- 
ber, numbered 600. The profits were 
made almost entirely from the sate 
of eggs, according to reports to the 
United States Department -of Agri- 
culture, the price received averag- 
ing about 35 cents per dozen. Many 
people have visited the farm, some 
corainp :i distance of 75 miles, ar.d 
le'iorts shew that nearly a hundred 
farmers who have studied the meth- 
ods used on tis farm are starting 
flocks. Mr. Harrison is increasing his 
flock and expects to devote addi- j 
tional time to his poultry plant. 



XCSCOURTESYK3[ 



SERVICE 
FIRST 



]&qSTABlLITY&g8 



A Solid Foundation 

This bank is built on a solid foundation of a large 
Capital and a Large Surplus which seaks SAFETY 
for your deposits. 

We want to do business with you and you will 
find that we "Do things for our Customers." 

4 Per Cent 

and taxes paid on tirne deposits. 



Capital $ 50.000.00 

Surplus $1,000,000.00 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

C. H. YOUELL, President. A. W. CORN, Vice-President. 

A. B. RENAKER, Cashier. 
Nell H. Martin, Asst. Cashier. L. C. Beemon, Asst. Cashier. 



MORE HONORS COME 

TO BOONE COUNTY! 

Boone county received honorable 
mention again when Kinsey Farm, ; 
of opeful Lane, went to the Blue \ 
Grass Poultry Show at Lexington, 
last week, and won best display on 
their Wyandottes. They were award- 
ed the mammoth silver cup given hy 
the Lexington Banker's Association, 
for having the best male bird of ths 
show. 

1st pullet, 1st old pen, 4th male, 4th 
hen, 4th pullet, and ran a very close 
second for Grand Champion female 
of the show. 

The Grand Champion Barred Rock 
cockerel of the Kentucky State Fair } 
of 1923. 

The Blue Grass Show was one of 
the prettiest of the season and had 
1028 birds entered. 

Mr. C. F. Kinsey returned from 
Lexington with a barrel of Henry 
Clay flour, a wool sweater, a ladies 
purse, the Grand Champion Ribbon 
given by the Farmers Home Journal 
and a large bunch of bananas in ad- 
dition to the Loving Cup and ribbons. 



Mrs. Mary E. O'Neal, of Aurora, 
Ind., sends us a check for another 
years subscription. Mrs. O'Neal likes 
to get the news from her old Ken- 
tucky home. 



Get in on the dog tax before it is 
everlasting too late. Don't be caught 
napping by letting your dog run with- 
out a 1924 tag. A dollar paid is 
eight saved. 



Mrs. B. H. Snyder of Erlanger, is 
home from Bethesda hospital much 
Improved after a serious head oper- 
ation. 



Mr. and Mrs. J, E. Gaines and »oa 
Virgil, sp*nt Sunday with Mrs. Kan 
ua- Cropper, 



COME IN 

and see our new and complete line of 

TAR BRAND SHOES! 

Spring styles for Men, Women and Children; La- 
dies' Comfort Shoes wish rubber heels— Prices right. 
Blankets, Outing Gowns. 

Ladies' Gingham Dresses $1.98 to $3.25 

Children's Middies 75c to $1.00 

Ladies' Wool Hose 98c 

Ladies' Silk Hos e 60c, 75c and $1.00 

See our line of Toilet Goods and Drugs. 
We have a complete line of 

Groceries, Fresh Heats, Vegetables 

Before you buy your Electric Fixtures see my selec- 
tion. I have 75 different fixtures to choose from. 
Prices arranging from $1.00 to $30.00-. 
These are on display at my store in Florence, Kentucky 
Come early and make your selection. 

32 and 110 Volt Eltotric Supplies. 

H. R. LEIDY 

WILLYS LIGHT DISTRIBUTOR 

Florence, - - - - Kentucky 



DO YOU TAKE THE RECORDER? 
Subscribe For The Recorder $1.50 per 



■aassi. 




mm 







T 



#ACR POUR 



» ■ ■■■ 



BOONE COUNTY E1C OIDU 



OUTLAWING THE POCKET 

FLASK. 

Public sentiment put the open sft- 
lov o"t of business'. 

: , » . « .1 thing td the 

pockel i -. 

Prinking of intoxicating 1 . liquor 
since the p as s a g e i>: ilii' Vo ls te ad 
Ac. .'irsi confined largely to th( 
large centers <>(' population in 'he 
Unilod Sffii-i, is sp reading to the 
smaller cities and towns and th? 
rural communities at such an alarm 
ing late that iota* steps will hav:> 
to !>♦■ tMkc;i to < urb the evil. 

FcopV were slow to act agains,. 
the open saloon, they have been 
ojur.lly slo\ ,r in the case of the pock- 
et flrj-k. But once aroused, a' senti- 
ivent that stands for right and pub- 
lic decency w.'ll not be denied, as 
was ?o"cIenrIy made manifestly hf 
the p»">-7 of the prohiL:1on amend 
1 1- ■ i to il c co! sti f ution, nnd the en 
forrt raant ;.ct 

he pockc t lla tl . will V.iwq to be os 
tracizcri from decent society. One.' 
'.I i-r aw ri;;ii ;..-:. mi many young peo- 1 
pie ■ it! i' •: :h':ik it necessary tr 
"take n inp*' .it the ilance or other 
metal \ mil ti on & i 

Mfc* >;;• i • k c- l:..i! drinking ui- 
popatar uil. '■■<■ n.i easy task. There 
i- tv7% 0«f restraint on youth that 
t»i<- • offce <\as, and parents do not 
have them under control as well is 
they might, hut the job ahead is 
small compared to that which culmin- 
ated with the passing of the publ j 
drinking piaci , 

The time is coming when the very 
men ..nil women who ade prohiH- 
t'Vi possible will huve to t'ike a 
stand on this qestionj and ft'hej 
can sot be evaded any l*>nj », tbj ■ 
will form ■> militant front to comb-ii 
it. 

Perhaps tntrtng such an alarming 
view of the .situation is too pessism- 
iatic; porlmrv-j the apparent looseness 
of so many yotmf people oi this da-, 
is only another aftermath of tfie per. 
iod of strain through which the pe >. 
pie nf the world passed during the 
war. 

ft nay he true that the alarmists 
are overdoing it, but there have been 
so many instances where the alarm 
hay been sounded too late and moth- 
er's hearts have been crushed aid 
fathers have been broken in spirit. 

Kw not oo late t<. save the boy 
r girl who has not been caught in 



th< 
»t - 



whirlpool that carries them t 
..'tjrss. 

The for.";-' atloi: cur. be tal 
the path-; ■] • y wiU : -„i : . tire 
pi©. who realize the dangi n ahea I .i 
not pWtptrrre definite action. 

OutZswiiig the pocket flask is th 
only course that lies before all d 
ecai pt-optc. 



MORE QUALITY IN LIVESTOCK 
SAYS EXPERT 

That one of the biggest proMemr, 
of the livestock industry in Kentucky 
is the production of higher quality 
p»duits with as low a cost of pro- 
' ^rfifcn as possible is the opini-.n 
•*r j^-rad by Prof. E. S. Good of the 
Kewtur^y College of Agriculture in 
«lKcassing the Farm and Home Con- 
tention ta be held here Jan. 29 ♦ , 
Feb. Ut. 

■"What agriculture needs general - 
lr and especially the livestock indus- 
try is economy of production and an 
especial care that the highest qual- 
ity of product seeks the market " h-> 
continues. "At the present time we 
have an over-production of pork and 
**.v, and the only phase of animal 
husbandry where we can a'Tord to 
.nci-rase the production is in large- 
Hocks of sheep, and in greater 
amounts «f dairy products. We can 
approve the quality of sheep by car- 
"P f «" the iambs; better feeding 
rRethada, locking, castrating and 
r-VK*hro<l sires -J, oUy a part in that 
• diraofem. Experiments are at this 
time beiug conducted to determine 
Whether the chucy, medium rangy, 
•r rangy type of hog is the most 
economical when we consider cost of 
'efcdStur- and eventual price brought 
•vi!* 1 !*. market ; But meanwhile we ca i 
a£pty the principles of economics by 
nsiiig hogging down crops, using sup- 
plementary feeds* proper pastures 
and better methods of cutting ant 
curing pork. 

Prof. Good is one of the speakers 



BUSINESS AND THE NEW YEAR. 

There is no need to start the nev. 
year with misgivings. 

Although business .sneered a slim 
during the latter half of 1028, due 
to the cautious attitude of business 
men generally, nothing alarming can 
be found in the present situation 

Last year started off with a rusr, 
because supplies of goods in tV 
hands of either the producer or the 
middlemen, had been almost c\ 
hni sled and buyers began to .''to 
up, when confidence was restored and 
it began to appear that we were re 
turning to normalcy. 

Buying turned into a veritable 
flood and did not lessen until busi- 
ness men began to recall bitter mem- 
ories of their experiences in 1920, 
which were still fresh in their minds. 
Then the cautious attitude develop- 
ed and there was an unmistakable 
cessation of trading activity. 

It was revealed by the shrinkage 
y one-fifth in the iron and steel oul 
put ami a sixteen per cent avera*T3 
decline on the Xew York Stock ex 
change between April and October. 
The talk that became general 
about the distressing condition of the 
farming interests evidently had much 
to do with the sudden letup in trad? 
activity. Since the rural business man 
is the biggest of the lot, any direful 
reports about his ability to buy af- 
l Cta all business adversely. 

Although business analysists pro- 

;. s to see an improvement in the 

agricultural situation, it has been so 

) ght tint farmers will have to have 

■lore substantia] proof before they 

• id adnjiS that they see light a'lc.iu. 

Supporting their claims that th" 

■ .•■•.; big business is better, trj.le 

■ •e-i.-i" «{» say that the farmers' b y- 
i*g j ewer improved in 1S>23 because 
if the improved condition of the 
manufacturers of agricultural im- 
plements and in the greatly increas- 

<1 -ales of the large mail orde.' 
houses. 

This is undoubtedly good evidence 
out it must be remembered that the 
tncrei :■<? in the receipts of mail br- 
ier horse* may not come about sole- 
ly because of the farmer's improved 
buying power. Some farmers, who 
i I ' er pa.ronizer! ^ pi] order houses 
>efori\ nay have turned to them on 
the theory that they could buy 
cheaper. False, as it is, this theo.y 
has hired many a farmer away from 
hi- home merchant, where he can al- 
ways buy dependable goods at a fair 
price, and v. here he can always re- 
turn for rcilir. < if the goods are not 
what they w ere represented to be. 
E'.yn though the experts for 1921 
;■ I c overemphasizing the im 
provement in the farmir- business, 




When 

they 

Cough 

Hf 7 
_1MP ; S 

Balsam 

Commissioner's Sale. 



Boone Circuit Court. 
Ezra Mllhoit's Adnv. a. ;f 

against 
Lzra Wilhoit's Heirs et al Deft. 

By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the Dec. Term 
hereof, 1923, in the above cause, I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at tht 
Tourt House door in Burlington, 
Hoone County, K>\, to the highest 
bidder, at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 1th day of February, 1924, at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ing property, to-wit: 

Tract No. 1. 

Lying and being near the town of 
Florence and on Bullock Pen branc'i. 
•n Kenton County, Kentucky: Be- 
rnning at a stone, a corner with Lot 
No. 3 on Bullock Pen Branch, in a 
line of John Goodridge tract of land; 
thence with the lines of said tract 
n8C'_.^2.33 chains; s67^E 




JU is for Walter, flying his kite; 

If he let go the string it would sail out of sigh*. 

Find two oXhtr boy* Upper lef I com«r down on sweater coat . upper left comer down, oa 

tweater sleeve 



at the special Livestock Conference 
of the Farm and Home Convention 
■bat he has here souned the key note 
*">! the Kratfings which will recom 
toe ad a constructive program of Ken- 
tucky agriculture. Other leaders in 
the conference will be L. D. H. Weld, 
Manager of the Commercial Research 
Department of Swift &. Co., who wil 
edeliver fectaresi oa "Looking Ahej>d 
«*ith Beference to Livestock" and 
"T1» Outlook in the Sheep Indus- 
try." 



Italy began the silk industry in the 
fourteenth century, but in 1750 
^rmxttm surpassed Italy and has sine* 
kept tkt first position. 

Street railway motormen and con- 
thretars of Sheffield, Ala., have re- 
c*ii*4 a voluntary wage increase of 
fivr a-ata a* hour. 



lead deposits in the United 
arm found chiefly in the Mis- 
Valley and the Sierra N.-- 
tadte Motjittaina. 

The wage scale of St Louis taxi 
cnhdmwra for 1924 calla for Itt.fiti 
a arsvk, an increase of $1 over th« 
«*d rata. 

Tittf-mifiH labor bank* havr be** 
•atabfabad in the Unitad SUtea anJ 
mS an aaaratlnf auccaeafully 



it may at least be said that this im 
porta nt branch of the business of iV 
country has not gone backwards. It 
is better than a year ago. 

And it will continue to improve 
if farmers generally will realize the- 
importance of organization for their 
mutual benefit and of co-operativo 
marketing of their products to the 
end that they may receive more for 
their labor and the price to the con- 
sumer may be reduced. 

EVERY MAN'S GOLD MINE 

Who is there in this broad land 
who wouldn't like to own a golo 
mine? 

And yet a recent writer tells us 
that every person on earth is him- 
self a gold mine. 

Just think it over quietly and you 
w-ill beforced to admit that it is'true. 
Your brains, your ability, is the prev- 
ious one which the world is paying- 
today. 

Some people have very little gold 
in their composition, in others it is 
so nixed with dross that it is almost 
indiscernible, and yet in others the 
mine is so rich that the precious 
ore is evident at a glance. 

Success in life depends upon one's 
ability to develop his own gold 
mine. Our life work is to bring out 
all the gold that is in us, to dig deep 

to make the most, of one's charac- 
ter, one's opportunities, one's self. 

We are like gold miners. We worii 
the cluim^a little while r and fatting 
to strike pay dirt at once, we quit. 

We undoubtedly know that we 
have talent and ability in certain 
directions, that if we work eami>«t'y 



.ve will attain our heart's desire, 
but we weary of the hard toil of re- 
moving the rubbish and earth, blast- 
ing the boulders and sinking the 
shaft, and too often give up when 
we are within a few feet of our 
goal.* 

But the gold miner who "gets 
there," who strikes pay dirt, is th;; 
man who keeps everlastingly at it, 
who never grows faint hearted, but 
who digs — no matter how many ob 
stacles he encounters. 

True it is that we do not all as- 
say alike, but we each have a claim 
and we will never find the ore by 
drawing hieroglyphics on the surface 
with sticks. We must dig, and dig 
deep, else we might as well not have 
a single ounce of gold in our mine. 

It is possible to make something 
of one's self, if we just work iincer.- 
santly, persistently, we will strike 
pay dirt. It is hard work, pa 
tience perservancc, a mighty effort, 
Intelligently directed, that will en- 
able us to strike the gold bearing 
vein. 



The reports of the ten bankT"ir, 
Moime county, published in this is- 
sue, show that there was on deposit 
in these institutions at the close of 
business on the) 81st day of Decern 
ber, |9g|, marly two million h\c 
hundred thotmai d dollars, whilf tli 
two banks at Krlauger show d 
Its of |74M3fM». 
/ 



6.7b 

chains to a stone; thence s89 4E 
6.72 chains sS9MiE 7.84 chains; »- 
Sfi'-E 303 chains; s55'ie 18 links 
to a stone in a line of Wm. McClurg. 
thence with his lines up a bran' h 
s35^w 6.10 chains; s25Hsw 5.30 
chains; sl8H>w 1.82 chains; s55»4w- 
2.01 chans; nl2e 22 links to a point 
in the % said branch, a corner with 
David Buffington ; thence with his 
Ines n87' 2 w 8 chains; n86^w 3.2;> 
chains to a corner of Loft No. 3 , 
thence with a line thereof pasing n 
stone on the north side of the branch 
n ,'nv 22,84 chains to he beginning, 
containing 35.33 acres. 
Tra<tf ■*?' 2. 
Lyinjr and being in Boone and 
Kenton Counties, Kentucky, nnd be- 
ing Lot Xo. 3 in division of the land* 
of Milton Wilhoit, deceased: He 
^"inninjr at a stone a corner with 
-Martha C. Wilhoit's dower in th? 
Builock Pen Branch road; thence 
with said road r nearly so and with 
the lines of Ezra Wilhoit s63e 5 33 
chains; s 82 Vie 8.66 chains; n69e- 
6.45 chains; n 89 >4e 7 links to > 
corner of Lot No. 4 passing a stone 
on the. south side of the road 85' - 
22.84 chains, passing a stone on the 
nrth side of the branch to a corne ■ 
of Lot No. 4 in a line ef David Buf- 
fington; thence with his lines n86v.. 
4 4.61 chains; s80w 8.62 chains to a 
corner of the Dower; thence with 
a line thereof nl8 w26.62 chains tj 
the beginning, containing 35 acres. 
Tract No. 3. 
Lying and being in Boone Coun- 
ty, Kentucky: Beginning at a stoii.! 
in the public road in a line of David 
Buffington, a comer wth Lot No. 1. 
thence with a line of Lots Nos. 1 and 
2, nl9w 34.10 chains to a corner of 
Lot No. 2 n the Bullock Pen branch 
road; thence with said road or near 



Johnson, J. S. Recett and Thomas 
Hood s44Viw 47.21 chains to a stone 
a corner with Hood; thence with 
Hood's line n34w 8.50 chains to a 
fence post, thence with a line of 
Hood and Russell Sparks s49Vaw 
18.70 chains to a stone; thence n35yi: 
w 11.24 chains to a stone a corner 
with Sparks, in a line of J. M. Baker; 
thence with Baker's n49e 61 links; 
thence n39%w 1 2732 chains to a 
stone; thence n47^e 5.70 chains to 
a fence post, corner with Baker and 
Thomas Ryan; thence with Ryan's 
line noOe 23.06 chains to a point n 
a branch; thence nSO'/iw 8.00 chains 
to a stone with Ryan and Cleek; 
thence with Cleek's line east 10.00 
chains to the beginning, containing 
One Hundred Thirty^kr.cv. ,::]7 " r> 
acres) more or less. 

For the purchase price the pur- 
chaser.., with approved security or 
securities, must execute bond.., 
bearing legal interest from the Any 
of sale until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a Judgment, witn 
a lien retained therein until all the 
purchase money, is paid. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly with 
these terms. 

R. E. Berkshire M. C. B.'C. C. 



'■■■»■■■. »'t»ii« > 



With the High 
School Cl&ssi j 

By MARGARET BOYD 



fa 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Ky 
Jacob B. Crigler's Admr., Plaintiff 

against 
Nicholas E. Crigler, et al. Deft. 
By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the August Term 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at the 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 4th day of February 1924, at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six months, the following property, 
!y so, s72%e 11.41 chains; s83M* e to-wit: 



1.75 chains; s63Vie 12 links to 'a cor- 
ner of Lot No. 3; thence passing i 
f.tone on the south side of the ro id 
si He 26.52 chains, passing a store 
on the south side of the road sl8e- 
26.52 chains, passing a stone on the 
north side of a branch to a corner 
with Lot No. 3 in a line of David 
Bffington; thence with his lines s80w 
3.72 chains; s 68ViW 6.50 chains; 
s89w 3.05 chains to the beginning 
containing 40 acres. 

For the purchase price the 
purchaser — ,with approved security 
or securities,. must execute bond — , 
bearing legal interest from the day 
of sale until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a Judgment, with 
a lien retained therein until all th«> 



purchase money is paid. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly with 
these terms. 

R. E. BERKSHIRE, M C. 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court 
Mattie J. Kite's Admr Plaintiff 

against 
Rex Kite, et al. Defendant 

By virtue of a Judgment and order 
of Sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December Tern: 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause i 
shall proceed to offer for sale at th* 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 4th day of Feb., 1924, at on-j 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts beincr 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ng property to-wit: 

Beginning at a line tree a corner 
with H. H. Cleek and Bert Huffman - 
thence with Huffman's line s4 1 \ e 
23.18 chains to a white oak tree: 
thence n60V*e 23.00 chains to a line 
tree on McCoy's fork of Mudlick 
creek, a corner with Huffman, Rich 
nrd Sleet and Walter Johnson 
thence with Johnson's line s81e 6.56 
hams t<> u point on th« north iith 
>f the creek; thence crossing sail 
•reek slOw 1.94 chains to a stone In 
a paling fence; thence with a line of 



A certain lot of land situated in 
the town of Hebron, Boone County, 
pentucky; Beginning at a stone on 
the North Bend Road, a corner with 
J. H. Tanner; thence with said ro*id 
s4ViW 4.36 poles to a stone; thence 
sSG'iw 17.72 poles to a stone 



thence nl8w 4.44 poles to a stone a 
corner of J. H. Tanner; thence with 

t,j_ n- oe \, ,«,, ,' , " ,w * uin vi-imgcr eiiua iiiniiins to master, 

h s line n86 V*el9 % poles to the be- I ne of America's scholarly men was a 



«B by Margaret Boyd.) 

"Happy Is this, she is not yet so eld 
but she may learn." 

. —Merchant of Venice. 
There has been much speculation 
as to the age at which people cease 
to be able to learn. There is, of 
course, no set age — some people can- 
not learn anything after they are 
twenty, and others can learn ufter 
they are a hundred. In general, too 
muoii "*•*"»« is laid upon youth as a 
requisite for those who wish to study 
new subjects. It is common to And 
people who have been unable to go 
straight from high school to college 
fearing that they will be Imndlcupped 
in their studies by their a?e if they 
enter after they have been out of 
school for some years. Sut'h, I think, 
is never true. 

Languages have ahvaj s bec-n held to 
be a subject that should be studied 
during youth. The very young child 
is learning words all the time, and It 
makes little difference^ him whether 
the word !■ Latin, English, French, 
Italian or Russian. It, therefore, 
seems probable that a very young child 
can letrn a new language much more 
quickly than an adult can. It Is much 
to be doubted, however, whether • 
slxteeo-year-old hoy can learn a new 
language any more quickly than a 
sixty year-old man. 

Benjamin Franklin began his study 
of languages after he had been for a 
long time the proprietor and editor 
of a newspaper, had published "Poor 
Richard's Almanac," had founded the 
Philadelphia library, and had done 
enoush other work to make the aver- 
age man think there was no ne»'d for 
him to study anything new. He first 
mastered French, then Italian, then 
Spanish, and finally Latin. 

Teachers are generally of the opin- 
ion that a ehlM entering school at the 
age of eight reaches high school at the 
same age as a child of equal native 
ability who enters kindergarten at the 
ane of three or four — an older child 
can learn in a lew weeks what It took 
the younger child months to master. 



ginning, containing one-half of nn 
acre. 

For the purchase price tho 
chaser, with approved security or se- 
curities, must execute bofid — , bear- 
ing legal interest from the day of 
sale until paid, and having the force 
and effect of a Judgment, with a lien 



conl miner. Ignorant even of his al- 
phabet, at the age of nineteen; yet he 
had completed a college education and 
become superintendent of schools in a 
larRe city at the same age that most 
men reach such positions. . 

Older people who have difficulty In 
mastering new sabjects are no more 



— « — -- -■ *• •«.•■ — *j v (i in""" ' '"•» "*" w«a#,r^. v *-o f*s %i a*v mot c 

ret ai n e d thrcin until all th e p u r chase nu mero us t han y o ung p eop l e w ho hav e 



~V"T" —-- ■•«%. fua v-itn -.i ll'llli' I «'U.- 1 ll nil ,»nwil^ jmrjTITT TT IIW IIHTTT 

money is paid. Bidders will be pre- , similar difficulty— the ease with which 
pared to comply with these terms. | one lesrns a new subject has little to 
R. E. Berkshire M. C. B. C. C. | do with age ; It Is rather a matter 

-.. _ — 1 ot na (j v# ability and a competent 

A Rat ThBt Didn't Small After | teacher. 
Being Do&d for Throo IWonl.-.s 

"I swear it was dead three months." write' M*. J. 
Sykra (N. J.). "I saw this rat every day: put n,m.i 
Rat-Snap behind a barrel. Months afterward-. n>y 
wifelnoked behind the barrel. There it was— d*ad." 
Rat-Snap kBs in three sues fonSSc. 65c. H.Z5. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

D. R. Blyrbe. RitrHuirton. Kv. 
OnM»y A P.t'it, Burlington, Kv 



FOR SALE 

BLUE GRASS FARM 



PAT SNAp 

1 V KILLS RATS ^r 



Better Than Traps For Rats 

Writ.. AdaiwDnnCo^Taaaa 

They ear s " RAT-SNAP !■ dohnj th. work 
and the rat undertaken are a. boay aa pop 
corn on a hot atore." Try it <m your rata. 

HAT-SNAP Is a "money back" 'iraaranteod 
aurekiDer. Cornea raady for naa ; nomix- 



A fine Stock Farm, Mb atrrcji. one 
mil.- from Riirliiis.* t< n. H.«.ii- i«miii- 
'y. Ky . on pike. gm»d fl room Ihmik. . 
lariw concrete winf,. r sun room. 2 
liRniH. other imildingH, pl*itv wnlrr 
splendid farm for irrnss, corn and 
tobacco. P» lee. *M.000. bin Minus 
worth mop- thou price of farm. Kor 
infornift'lroi. write or e^e 

I). K. <!a*tl<i»sn, Rrlanger, 
or p.t»r Miicliert, Nt wpoot. Kv. 
|an 17 84 * 



Portland cement first is mentionei.' 
in a patent jrranted just 100 yea. 
ago to Joseph Aspden, a bricklay >r, 
of Leeds, England. 

The value of the dairy pro.lucll n 
>f Canada for the year just tnden 
I placed at |2o0,000,000. 



r^ w . . •. i "■■■■■ iwurivr uot , iw mi l" 

in* with othar fooda. Cats and docs won't 

touehit. Rata dry up and leave no arm" 
Three sixae: Ste for one room: «o I 
bona, or chicken yard :«1.2fi for bam s 
ootbulkUnaa. Start killrn, rata today. 

Go Hoy dr. Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R. BIrthe, Burlington, Ky 

FARM FOR RENT. 



My farm In Bullittsville neigh 
borhood is for rent to a good tan- 
ant tor -th* year. 

Mr a. Lorena Cropper, 
Phone 167 Burlington, Ky. 



FOR SALE 



Ati opportunity of a liftHm*— tig 

ItnMuh rlffller* aue '4 m.»n lo on,, 
v-ai ; registered ami transferrabie 
priea Wntum. or will ce'l singly. 

- n ii yu a sonn, Oram, Ky 



I 



C. H. Y0UELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Prices. 

Burlington, Ky. 
Phone Burlington 65 




DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

•'^.DBNTISTetS^ 
In my new office 

Clayolo Place, Plorence, KV. 

Teeth extracted painless. Bridge 
ao.dl Plar* Work •,s>r>»«»«ifj- 

All Work Guaranteed 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



F. W. Kassebaum & Son 

J84NIT8 S HiRBU 

MONUMENTS, 

B Large 8toch on Display 

to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme'l 

118 Main Street, . 

AURORA, IND. 



RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Covers and Open 
Door Curtains for all make of cars. 



FURNITURE. BUGGIES & WAGONS 

Reupholatered, and Celluloid 

Lights Replaced. 



People I 



ho use the 
I as sified 
ads in this 
paper profit by them. 
The tittle ads bring quick 
results. What have 
you for sale or want to 
to buy. The cost is too 
sntaM to consider. 



J. G. GORDON 
Superintendent ef Schools 

OK BOONR cearNTY 

Will be in his office in Burlington 

the first and neeond Monday and 

the third and fourth Saturday 

in each month. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by cyldver- 
tising. 



N. F* PENN, M D 
Cov i ngton 

We Teat Eyeta Right 

and 

Make Glaaaes Thai 







TAKB YOUR COTTNTY PAPRR. 

READ YOUR 

COUNTY PAPER 

$1.50 The Year. 

Sabacribr for tbr» RF ^Rr»F*» 
.••♦•♦♦♦••♦•♦♦♦•a ♦•♦•#>♦♦♦• 

K . ■ ■ _ 

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE. 



Notice is hereby given that all per- 
rion« indebted to the estate of II. \V. 
Nelson must pay tame to me. All 
persons who hsva claim* against said 
estate must present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. 

COLIN KELLY. 
Admr. with the will annexed. 




BaBssBBaea 



<■ ■- 



T 



■■*■ 



■«■ 



BOONE COUNT T RECORLER 



B0 ^^Sf R ! FranchiseJor Salt 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



Foreign Advaninin* Representative 
_ THE AMERICAN t"*KS5 ASSOCIATION 

Entered at the Postofflce, Barling- 
ton, Ky., as second-class mail. 



K 



ADVERTISING RATES. 

Furniahed on aDplication. TK« 

t«Iu« of tii* RECORDER at «■ ad- 
vertising medium it unquestioned. 
Tha character of the advertisements 
Dew in it* column*, and faa number 
of them, tell the whole rtory. 



The Recorder Stand* For 

BETTER FARMING. BETTER CIV 
IZENS, BETTER HOMES" 




This and That. 

Let the cold waves wave — but not 
toe long. 

It isn't taxes that's hurting the 
ceunty. It's interest. 

Whatever career you embrace, be 
sure that it isn't a married woman. 

Have you all figured out what you 
ares going to do with the extra dav 
in 1924? 

The United States received 1',- 
260 sealskins last year from the Pri- 
bylof Islands. 

It takes more than an eyebrow on 
the upper •lip to make a Charley 
Chaplin income. 

The nice thing about being the 
weatherman is that you always have 
another gues„ ». . ,g. -!•««< 

Automobile production may have 
increased fifty per cent in 1923, but 
the ability to buy didn't. 

Yes, there's no doubt about nor- 
malcy returning. Harry Thaw wants 
to be judged of sound mind. 

Hollywood may have reformed, 
but a lot of motion picture actors 
and "actresses who live 1 there haven't. 

Very few things turned out as bad- 
ly as the crronic pessimists expected 
in 1923, but that happens every day. 

Trap shooting is to be revived, due 
to a decrease in the price of shells, 
but price never stopped crap shool- 
) ng. 

The railroad miiea 120,685 per- 
sons last year, which doesn't include 
those who got caught at the cross- 
ing. 

No young man was ever refused, 
however, because he had a house an-l 
lot and a car and a fat bank ac 
count. 

—According to- current report, Frank 
lin's picture is on the new $100 bill, 
but it can't be confirmed in this vi- 
cinity. 

If it's true that Henry Ford gets 
1 ,500 letters a day asking for money 
he ought to have a nice stamp col- 
lection. 

It't »co bad some of the railroad 
"fryers'* which kill a oatch of mo- 
torists every now and then, don t 
really fly. 

The prognosticators of an open 
winter should follow the example of 
the noble ground hog when he sees 

hie shadow. 

The pickpokct who, when arrested, 
admitted that he had averaged a doz- 
n robberies a day, was doing his 
jly dozen. 

Here's hoping that some of our 
ie young bachelors get caught. It 
would serve them right for holding 
out so long. 

An automobile manufacturer said 
that America is on wheels. And none 
of them came from the heads oi tfjo 
automobile drivers. 

It is said that the average ma:i 
spends three years of his life but- 
toning hi.s collar. Trrhars whiskers 
would be better after all. 

Statisticians tell us there are foui 



Fiscal Court of Boone County, 
Dec. 4thv 1923. 
Hon. N. E. Riddell, Judge Presiding. 

A Resolution providing f«t the let- 
ting at Public Bidding of tte fran- 
chise right of entering uponaall the 
public roads and highways of JBoonc 
County, Kentucky, ntcessary for the 
purpose of erecting, constructing, 
incorporating, maintaining, replacing 
and removing poles wires, brackets, 
supports, guys and all necessary ap- 
pendages thereto, and thereon, said 
poles suitable and proper to conduct 
a high voltage electric currant over 
and along any and all roads and 
highways in Boone county, now open 
or to be opened, for a period of 
twenty years from the date of ac- 
ceptance of the bid of the successful 
bidder. 

Be it resolved by the Fiscal Court 
of Boone County, Kentucky, that the 
County Clerk and be she is hereby 
appointed a committee of one to 
advertise, by three insertions in the 
Boone County Recorder that said 
Fiscal Court will receive sealed bids 
up to twelve o'clock Tuesday, FebT 
6th, 1924, for the sale of the Fran- 
chise right and the privilege of en- 
tering upon and along all the pub- 
lic roads and highways of Boone 
County, Ky., necessary for the pur- 
pose of erecting, constructing, oper- 
ating, maintaining, replacing and re- 
moving poles, wires, brackets sup- 
ports, guys and all other necessary 
appendages thereto and thereon, 
suitable and proper to conduct a 
high voltage electric currant over 
and along the roads imd highways ot 
Boone County. 

All bids shall be sealed and mark- 
ed "Bid for Electric Light Franchise" 
and the Fiscal Court reserves the 
right to reject any and all bids; and 
no bids wil} be accepted for an 
amount less than the cost of adver- 
tising, and all bidders ma y in trn»y 
discretion, make their bid for the 
cost of adversising, plus any addi- 
tional sum they may desire to bid. 

Upon the acceptance of the bid~"of 
the successful bidder his successors 
and assigns shall havt the right to 
go upon the roads and highways oJ 
Doone County covered by this reso- 
lution and there erect, construct, 
v.. „.„»,.,.., ,*.|iaii anu operate a line 
of poJes and wires, brackets, cross- 
arms and all other apptndajres there- 
to or thereon, and do all things nec- 
essary for the purpose of construct- 
ing, operating, maintaining, replac- 
ing or repairing or removing the ao- 
pliances used by him or it, in a 
proper emplyment herein contemp- 
lated. 

None of the poles, wire, bracket-., 
cross-arms or other fixtures shall he 
so replaced or maintained as to in- 
terfere with the travel on or the 
drainagt of any road in Boone Coun- 
ty, and any and all poles, wires and 
fixtures shall be changed upon the 
resuest of. the Fiscal Court or the 
County Road Engineer of Boon- 
County, Kentucky. 

N. E. RIDDELL, 

County Judge 



TURN ME OVER 

^isoippo]^ v Jo~}.no 
t*Xauoui &^z\ u/«\juoa\ 
|*Ave<ri :£imjjpu £jeVJT 



PAGE 





* . Trade Wiirrs They flll Trade 



1924 




1 a, 

«5ome magician. Ill 
say Ke is. Saw Rim , 
&M&UKoney ri^t\i out] 
of a mar\\s ftai .' " 




: 



Dangerous 

COUGHS 

creep on unawares 

—but you can quickly check 
them by taking Dr. Bell's Pipe- 
Tat Honey in time. It brings to/' 
inflamed tissues in the throat 
and chest just the aid they need. 
Dr. Bell's stops the cough with 
the same medicines that your doc- 
tor would prescribe— combined 
with the well-tried old remedy— 
pine tar honey. Its taste is pleas- 
ant, too. Keep Dr. Bell's on hand 
for all the family. 

All drugfim. Re&ae tn get 
the genuine. 

DR. BELL'S PtnoTar Honey 



Our experience in seed buying and distributing is at your service. Our rec- 
ord as distributors of quality seeds is your guarantee ot quality when you 
send your order. We do not try to compete with low grade seeds as we 
can /lot sell high purity and high germinating seed at prices you pay for 
inferior seed. 

"THE BEST IS NONE Tt)0 GOOD FOR 

THE FARMER/' 

has been our slogan and we have lived up to it. And yet our prices are 
oftimes lower than the poor grade seeds you get elsewhere. A tew cents 
more on a bushel of seed mean dollars more for you at harvest. Send us 
your orders or inquiries on 

Clover, Red Sapling, Alsike, Alfalfa, Japa. 

White or Yellow Sweet, Ky. Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass, Timothy, Red Top. 
Vetch, Kentucky Lawn Grass, etc 



Kansas Kream Flour. 



Arcade Flour. 



vjeo. id. Ua 




WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seedand Grocery House"- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18-20 West Seventh St. 

""■* ** 33S " d " 6 Covington, Kentucky. 

•I 



"Do Rata Talk to Each Other?" 
Ask* Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 

"I got five cakes ol Rat-Sn.ip and tl.rew pieces 
arouml feed store. Got about half a d'acn dead rats 
a day for two solid weeks. Suddenly, they Rot fewer. 
Now we haven't any. Who told them about Rat, • 
Snap." Rat* dry up and leave no scicli Three 
sues: J5c, 65c, *!.25. 

Sold and guaranteed by 

Gulley & Pel tit. Burlinntoii, Ky. 

D. R. Blithe, Burlington. Ky. 

~ FOR SALE " 

Farm of forty-seven acres on He- 
bron pike iiHar Limaburg, Ky ; good 
house and all n^cHnsar* outbuild- 
ings; elw'rie light*; <*»a#jr of fruit 
and water. A beautiful home. 
I DUNSON. 
ii29 R F D. Florence, Kv 




Chic Current Style 



Notice its hereby given that in pur- 
suance of the foregoing order I will, 
as instructed therein, receivt bid.> 
for the sale of said franchise until 
noon Tuesday February 5th, \9?.i. 
All bids shall be sealed marked 
"BIDS FOR ELECTRIC LIGHT 
FRANCHISE." No bids will be re- 
ceived or considered unless the 
amount of the advertising is bid. 

Given under my hand as clerk of 
the Boone Fiscal Court this January 
4th, 1!>23. 

M. E. ROGERS, 
Boone Fiscal Court 

Announcement today of the merg- 
ing of the Crosley radio interest!; 
htre has revealed one of the newest 
developments of this remarkable in- 
dustry. Moreover it has resulted in 



teen million automobiles in the {,""<;' Cincinnati becoming one of the r«t- 
b t who's going to count them **t d !° tPntcrs of tne world as the cont- 
cfeaek up on the statisticians | bintrf companies, which hereafter 

tVho's going to bo the next pre*- ! 'Slr^JTVu 2" ^"-PS. 
cVm of the United States is not wo-- > 0,I ™ atlon ' wlU hc ; !t ls said, ths 
ruing people half so much a" where ! ,T ***? ,nanufactur,n e or *a ' 
to find a good parking space! J at,on f 8 ° far . aS the actuai P roa ' * 

Fru,,. is reported to b e "p ltW ■ '°" ° f reCC<V '" g »* ' 3 '^^ 



ing" to pay her war debt. What wv 
would like for her to be is "prepar- 
ed" like he is to fight Germany. 

Friendship that flows from _the 
heart can be relied on, but thnt 
which comes from a bottle nowadays 
is very likely to break it in twain. 

The man who used to have a weak 
ha«k from chopping wood now has p 
son who has a weak back from eran! - 
lag his automobile on a cold morning 

So.uc scribe wrote that "It is with 
wards as with sunbeams — the more 
feey are condensed, the more thev 
hum." Congressional Record plea'* 
tepy. 

A baby hippo walked fifteen min- 
rtrs after it was born in a Zoo, th? 
*'.h*r day. Bit not much complimen- 
tary Mn be said about a- hippo's 
waTkingVat any age. 

Son-e sejentist said the Japanese 
t :rthq nke Vnnred un to move 50i» 
i <les nearer the sun. And th* weath- 
f man proceeded to knock his pre- 
diction into a cocked hat. 

It's cotrfmon to hear 'people sav 

t*4t children of the present genern- 

are not disciplined like their 

parents wore. But if thev were their 

nurenta nfver admitted it. 

King George of Greece didn't hit <• 

►-« hair cut until he got oul of the 

>fl'»rHry, far f Mr „f having hi* 

throat cut. Reminds us that ue put 

of faith in the harbor. 



For some tine past Powel Crosley, 
Ir., has been President of both the 
Crosley Manufacturing Co. and the 
Precision Equipment Co.. the lattr: 
oeing one of the original liceneen un- 
der the famous Armstrong regenera- 
tive patents. Production figures of 
these companies, when operated is 
separated units, are said to hav* 
shown that each manufactured more 
radio receiving sets than any other 
onipany in the world, and so those 
Interested in the trade are out spok- 
en in their ^assertion chat the o.tpu: 
of the oombined organizations will 
exceed, many times, that of any oth- 
er radio manufacturer. 

It has been stated that the Crosby 
anufacturing Co., has been produc- 
ing more than 1,000 sets dajly, but 
'^.' demand has been so great thnt 
Mr. Crosley has made preparation j 
for The Crosley Radio Corporation 
^ <t"n ->>t n'ow than 5,000 ever\ 
<»7, by the purchase of a much lar- 
■ lauory. 

F«r*fv- Urths and more mnrriagcr 
are noted in New York. Fol!:-« mot 
be losing sight of the inct that earn 
child counts so much oc when you co 
to fill out your income tax blank. 

In order to give the milkman *n 
opportunity to attend church the or 
™iied housewives of Richmond, 
V«., have voted in favor of the ellm 
(nation of the second milk deliver* 
w Sunday morning. 



FAVORITE SONS. 

The favorite-son scheme, a method 
used to head off candidates for pres- 
ident who are leading the field, will 
be used in the forthcoming cam- 
paign according to present indica- 
tions. 

Some times it works for good and 
sometimes for harm, according - 1 
the viewpoint of the partisan who 
may favor the candidate who is ou; 
in front. 

It begins to look like opponents of 
William G. McAdoo, former secre- 
tary of the treasury and director- 
general of the ailroads during the 
war, aro. conspiring to check the ear- 
ly advances he is making toward:, 
the nomination. No less than nine 
difi'erent men are being mention* ! 
as favorite-son candidates who /coj'd 
Control enouph votes, which, togeth- ! 
cr with the votes Senator Underwood 
rightfully claims, would be enough 
to prevent McAdoo from obtaining 
the necessary two-thirds to win the 
nomination. j 

There is some talk of favorite sons 
within the republican ranks, to head 




►w^^^^vNk%r^^i^ww^^^fe ^ 



You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered ty 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 



ot 



Erlanger. Ky. 



Every woman who aspires to owning j 

a youthful chic wrap has only to - 

choose ttu* handsome box coat pictured ? 

I •«. '.m <:irn<>r he improved j 



)^^^%^^tf^ii^^^^^mr^^wH-, 



t: 



h.rf 

o; "i. h is i. uide ai' astrakhan cloth 
ir. two coI< rs. 1 mt might be copied In 
n '!;.rere:it fur fabric and be equally 
hi'iilfnnie. Th? inise. fine buttons 
iite used for i>rntim"tit. and the small- 
er ones t'nr fastening. 



Established lSSfi. 



1 



I 



who is preparing to muke an aggrrs- 
sive campaign in all primary states. 

Senator Watson of Indiana, ani 
Former Go vcrnoa Lowden of Illinois 
M'c regarded as possible candidates. 
b it they have withheld announce- 
ment of their plans for the present ; 

President Coolidgc seems to hav? 
the inside tracg for the Republican 
nomination and McAdoo is leading 
in the democratic iitld, the political 
prophets say, but in the case of the I 
republicans, the favorite-son move- i 
ments seems to be not so much di! 
rected at the leadtr, as at one who 
may ipterfcre with the plans of the 
leader. 

However, the movement term ir- 
ate* it will be watched with interest 
to see whether favorite sons are as 
much favorites aa they once were. 

Still, a favorite son won the Re- 
publican nomination in 1920, am 
thore is always a possibility that om 
may, do it in either party. 

The king of G.occe snys that >.v 
•o !d rather shine shoos than be tl.-j 
n„' of G. cere. Well, there are plen 
* r ft opportunities in this country 
r'or him. 

The first paper mill in ^nioric . 
was opened near Philadelphia in 
I860. The aper making wu done by 
hand, and until 1766, when the pulp 
ongine was introduced into A merle 
from Holland, the rage continued to 
>l bentan into pulp by hand. 



r MTV! Mil 



MEMTHDl COUCH DROPS 
tor /lose and throat. 

l?ivp riiiirL' PpIipF 
— ■»■— t •-• 



Begin The 

NEW YEAR 

RSGHT 

Opening a bank accourt is the rr.cst practical 
beginning. Adding to it gives you a ccinicnabie 
and satisfied teeling of security. It also stimulates 
your energy and insures your future, if you con- 
tinue in the same way. This bank inyht-s >ou to 
become a depositor and 

GROW WITH IT. 

Boone Co. Deposit Bank 

Burlington. Kcntutkyr~ 



Children 
and Older Folk 

cause many cases' f corstipattoi. 
flatulence. headache. - inm, bad 
breath, sleapletaneM and emacia- 
tion. 
FREY*S VERMIFUGE 

!•• raf«. ol<Madriio«r < rwn-dyfar 
womi. (■ um fo( Over •evenljr- 
fivarou-a. 

30 nmtw a kottU 
•i your <t«jaJm, o> mm by mail am 
raoaiptaf prtea, 

K. * S.FREY 
■a^ta-Wwlaa Nil 

B.lnmocMa 



NOTICE. 



I have ar my uriibl*** rh«ir«>'nl kmi! 

die !>i>il MtnllK.ii, Y>>utip Kill. 591", 

A. S. H R.. property iif th* 1 lliiir«-.t 

Hrtit.s OoVHriiiifiir. Y««ni>g Hu| i* 

| a '.rovm slr»- of hiKh-elaxx »a<ld t» 

ji'idtit. a»<l will ntakf W»e «• »tnm W 

J iy-24 at the Krlangt-r Kitir On » <iml » i 

Ariauxeit ent* nay !>•■ um> f« -i 

' breeding hv an p l y tt'g t«> 

J T. RAfFKltTY. L.mhI Ali 
Fair On>unh», Krlmi;t'i Kt 

9 2t Ph.uif. Rrl. \hb. 



"I Got Real Mad when I Loat My 
Setting Hen," writes Mr*. Hanna, I 
N.J. ; 

" When I tnt Into our turn sod found my bast j 
•rttrr ili- ill I go'- real mad. On* package ol Rat- , 
Snap ktllrd six log rait. Poultry ralam ihoul.l uaa . 
Rat -■iril> " C«mn In cake«, no mixing. No im«tl 
torn daad rat*. I'hrrriiirt. Vrtcr-t, ISc.55c,$t.JS. 
Sold and guarfntml by 

D. K. HIviIih. Hurlington, Kv 
Oulley A P.ttln. hWliugrou, Ky 



Raw Fur Wanted 



Largely through wage reductions 
the Uritisn railway companies cut | , 
panaea last year to the extent of ov 
er $260,000,000. 




THE "MISSING LINK" 

A speaker at the meeting of the 
American Association by the Ad- 
vancement of Science said that the 
"missing link" is in a fair way of 
being discovered, in fact, it may be 
found any day. 

He reported that all of America 
and western Europe havs been ex- 
plored, which is assurance e n o ug h, 
perhaps, that we have escaped th" 
possibility of that phantom of 
science being found in our midst. 

Americans may now well feel se- 
cure and Mr. Bryan may continue *n 
• rule.nn the theory of evolution 
for all we care. t 

The "missing link" is not among 
us. Let joy be unrestrained. 

Hat even scientists may make 
mistakes. 



too Urge — Nuf 9ed. 

1 1 r. . 1 1 1 r . 1 1 I KIRK 

M i . I h|, toll, K 



The Mexican army is believed 
be tne only buyer of airplanes 
Mexico. 



in 



In the tout* of France the pro- 
duction of Uvtnder oil is a pleasant 
tnduatry. 



■i 



^^ 



■BBBB»«»»«BBBSI 



■■I 



Bass 



wmm*——*» 



* 



_ 



BOONE COUN TY RECORDER 



PAOB n V 



m- _* 




1 1 


F!:ronc3 Theatre 




Florence. Ky. 


K- 


ALMA RUBENS IN 

"THE VALLEY OF THE 
SILENT MAN" 


1 - 


From tin- story by 
Janus Oliver Curwood. 

Saturday, Jan. 19th. 




HOOT GIBSON 




"BLINKY" 




Tuesday, January 22d. 




Admission, 22c £& 10c 






t\ 


NONP ARIEL PARK 

Mrs. Lewis Houston has been quit 
the past woek. - 



BIG BONE. 



Geo. Rendricks called on his be?t 

grirl Sunday. 

Jones ii Carroll have purchased a 

new Schacht truck. 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Bakvv 

on the 11th a baby girl. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Felthai:.- 
jspent Sunday with relatives in Cov- 
\fgion. 

J. Conner Carroll hauled a nice loa I 
<of tobacco to Walton lats Thursday 
Yor Irvin and Carl Edwards. 
■*.» Mr. Walter Jones and daughter 

Lillian, and Mrs. Addie Burrows 
iinade a business trip to Walton, Sat- 
urday. 

J Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Jones, Mr. 
"Smd Mrs. M. C. Carroll and James 
Jones, spent Sunday with Christena 
Juries, of Covington. 



a iikv I 



on tli 



been 



Wilford Scott has accept ed 
.■i. -ition in the city. 

Elmer Corbfn has been 

ih k list the past few days. 

Mrs. Edward Sydnor ha. 

he -nek list the past week. 

.Mrs. Ora Lad spent Monday after 
dob in Covington shopping. 
Victor Middledbrf has been quie 
-.11 the past week with tonsilitis. 

J. G. Renaker attended a road 
'mating at Fratikfort, Monday. 
Francis Kenney and wife spent 
Vhe week-e:: '\with her parents, at 
Walton. 

Russell Mitchell and wife spent 
Saturday afternoon in Covington, 
chopping. 

v Don't forget to attend the W. W. 
\ Woodward sale Saturday, Jan. 19th, 
Vicar Devon. 

1 Miss Mamie Robinson, of Rich- 
"urood, was the Sunday guest of Miss 
Eva Renaker. 

Gilbert Smith, who has been quite 
ill the past two weeks, is improving 
j*t this writing. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Tanner have 
* radio installed in their home on the 
Burlington pike. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Kindred, of 
-•wi".„., hC ,, .spvnt T?i'>™«!a-y v>iiu Tviif- 
sel] itchell and wife. 

v'has. Beall, Jr., spent last Sunday 
nftt-rnoon with Bug Ogden and fam- 
l< , of near Limaburg. 

John Surface who has been connn- 
■il to his home for several days, is 
-itole to be out again. 

Elbert Rice made a business trip 



Honor Roll of Big Bone Church 
school for month ending January 7th, 
1924. 
Grade I— 

David Setters. 

Anna Catherine Aylor. 

Henry Brown. 
Grade II— 

Robert Lews Arrasmith. 

Lillian Clay Hawkins. 
Grade III— 

Paul Shields. 

Susie Catherine Allen. 

Joseph Black. 

Grade IV— 

Maude Ethel Arrasmith. 
Gladys Moore. 
William Moore. 
Paul Setters. 
Grade V— 

Dora Shields. 

Edna Black. 

Lida Brown. 

Anna Mae Setters. 
Grade VII— 

Franklin Allen. 

Joseph Aylor. 

Attendance (present every day in 
month.) 

Susie Catherine Allen. 

Franklin Allen. 

Joseph Aylor. 

Dora Shields. 

Paul Shields. 

Gladys Moore. 

William Moore. 
Anna Mae Setters. 



DANCE 

At Florence Theatre 

Florence, Kentucky £ 

Friday, Jan. 18/24 

8 to 12 P. M. 

Murphy's Jazz Band 

Admission $ l .00 ; Ladies Free. 

War Tax Included. D. H. S. P. 



RABBIT HASH. 

Edgar Clore has the mumps. 
Mildred Hodges visited at Mode 
Hodges^ last Wednesday. 



Sheriff's Sale forTaxes 

Notiee is hereby given that I will 



Now is the time Mr. Farmer for you 
to think of the Seed you are going 
to plant this winter. 

What are you going to plant? How many acres j 
will you Sow? What kind ot Seed will get you| 
the best Results? 

THINK IT OVER. 

[We are now prepared to take your order for any variety] 

of winter seed. 
ANCY NEW TIMOTHY, 

KENTUCKY BLUE GRASS, 

ORCHARD GRASS, RED C T ^VER, REH TOP. 
ALSIKE CLOVER, ALFALFA CLOVER, 

YELLOW and WHITE SWEET CLOVER, 
lit is a fact that in previous years, prices of seed have always! 
jumped as the seed season advances, so why not play wise. 

GET YOURS NOW. 

You'll get the best of seed from us, high test, pure seed, 

and you will save money. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 



<! 



Lewis L. Stephens spent Sunday on Monday, February 4th, 1924, it 



afternoon at Hubert Clore's 

Myrtle Smith spent last Sundr.y 

afternoon with Helen Clore. 

James Wilson visited at S. .1. 

Stephens' Sunday afternoon.. 



. , - — w 1 r — 

being County Court day, between 
the hours of 10 o'clock a. m. F and 
3 o'clock p. m., at the court house 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., expose to public 



Most of the children of thuKcom- ; g^p for cash in hand> the f ii owing . 
munity have whooping cough. ! property or so much thereof as may 

Solon Ryle and wife are enter- ! be necessary to pav State, County 
taming a 9-pound boy since Jan. 11. | an rf Schuol taxes thereon, and unpaid 

A party was enjoyed at William j f or the year 1923, and the penalty, 
Hankmson'^ last Wednesday night, interest and costs thereon. 

Herman Ryle and wife are oper- Vn - _ ~„ m „i„*„ A„ m „-i„n * t u 
.■.. ., . . . ... , I for a complete description of the 

atmg the switch board at this .place. property ^Tax Commissioner's 

Mrs Mabel Hodges spent Sunday books for th(J 192£ h c 

with her parents, Murray Ryle and t Tax Comm 1 8fioner . a offlce in J^ 



wife. 

Z. T. Kelly was painfully but not 
>. seriously hurt last Wednesday from 
> a fall. 
\ Blanche Williamson spent a few 

cUys with Murray Ryle and wife, last ! n „ n *"* T,ew rpeci 
week. Pape, Eume est., 1 town lot 

L. Stephens has purchased M 
and is now a mer 



Misses Mildred and Helen Gaines 
to Burlington Monday for the Cirv have , whooping cough. 



annati Hay & Grain Co. 



^. Miss Jessie Pettit is spending a 



man ««y ot virain »_»o. k ™«» »'»« * t"u jo 

Mrs. C. C. Roberts, of Covington, Vw days in Burlington. 
spending a few weeks with her ^ Miss Kittie Brown ca 

,. Wm. Ut 

lton, G\\ Mr8> 

id and \"t agai 

*Mrs. ! 

, after 
'era! M . 



»s spending 
^daughter, Mrs. M. G. Martin. 

Miss Nora Cahill, of Hamilto 
is the guest of Jerry Conrad 
fasaHy, of the Dixie Highway. 

.Miss Lizzie Dorsey spent several 
days last week with Misses Ad 
-and Tina Norman, of Covington. 

Mr. James Layne, of the Dixie V 
Highway, made a business trip to 
' Chicago and Washington the past 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Shrout of the Dixie 
Highway, are rejoicing over the ar- 
rival of a fine baby at their home 
since last week. 

The many friends here regret to 
. bear of Miss Addie Norman has been 
Vjuite ill the past week with tonsilitis 

-\t her home in Covington. 

O H. R. Tanner and wife entertain- 
■ ed at dinner Sunday Ellen Utz and 

family, Edward Stephens and wife 

adn Edgar Aylor and wife. 



Geo. Goodridge, who suffered X paJ ^e a tt^ld ' f " 

broken limb, is getting along as wel> ^t her ■ Mrs J W Ro 1 
as could be expected. Mrs. Charles X m ' r "' l - R ° 1 U8 ?' 

VnHnn ;■ hoi n ;~~ ♦„ ui_ rA Mrs. L. h. Beemon had as guest i 



Fulton is helping to nurse him. 

Mrs. James Layne left Tuesday 
f*or Washington, D. C, on a busine.-s 
trip and "will meet her husband there. 
••They will return home Tuesday. 
v Mrs. Geo. Coyle, of the Dixie High- 
Vway, had as guests Tuesday after- 
noon, Mrs. Ed. Slayback and other 
lady friends of Crescent Springs. 

•J Mrs. Timothy Westbay, of Cov- 

— — iiigtun, and W. R. Rogers and sibUi i s 

• -of Burlington, spent Sunday with 

1M. G. Martin and wife, of Florence. 



1DLEWILD. 

As the days grow longer, winter 
jprows stronger. 

A great many in the community 

v are ill with heavy colds. 

\ Miss Roberta Randall is again in 

\|chool after a severe case of mumps. 

3 Forest Krutz, of Petersburg, will 

«Ierk for L. C. Scothorn this year. 

An excellent harvest of five-inch 
ice was housed during the recent 
-zero weather. 

Tommy Masters, who has been i 
\ "wery efficient clerk in Scothorn's 
V grocery, will move to the Bee Gaines 
Vara*. 

-j Mrs. Anna Barrett, of Lawrence- 
hurg, recently presented her small 
(randdoughter Anna Lucille Grant, 
with a piano. 

The tobacco from this neighbor- 
hood is slowly being put on the 
loose leaf market. No high prices so 
far being received. 

Just after pulling a load of to 
bacco on to the Aurora ferry bout 
Tuesday, one of L. C. Scothorn '« 
big draft mam fell dead. 

Walton R. Berkshire and couain, 

"Nerria Berkshire, of Petersburg, left 

Monday morning by. motor, for a trip 

to North Carolina where they will 

, spend several months hunting and 

Oiing. 



LIMABURG 

Miss Susie Utz has been very 
the past week. 

Geo. Heil made a business trip to 
the city, last Friday. 

Miss Rachel Utz spent Saturday 
with her grandmother 



v, r,. l.. oiepnei 
\B. Ri.?«.' s store 
Y.a.,<. 

^J 11. M. and S. 
;il ■ chased Henry 1 



C. Wilson have pur- 
chased Henry Bassengei-'s farm on 
Lick c r tek. 

Lavine Stephens and wife spent Humphrey, Lewis H. town lot $15.33 

Sundny with her parents Charles Humphrey, Mrs Ruth, town lot $3.9i< 

_i«_ T>.,a ir i ± i.i. <•< . r-- 



Court House. 

B. B. HUME, 

Sheriff of Boone County. 

Amount of Tax 

Belleview Precinct 

$4.77 
BullitLville Precinct 
McNaughton, Ida 265 acres $207.47 

Carlton Precihcx 

Hillis, Val 1 town lot $10.75 

Constance Precinct 



called on Mrs. 
Utz Tuesday afternoon; 

Lizzie Rouse is able to be 
again after being very ill. 

Stella Waters spent Monday 
afternoon with Mrs. Lizzie Rouse. 

Miss Kittie Brown spent Monday 
afternoon with Mrs. Amanda Tan 
ler. 

Mrs. Hubert Beemon spent Thurs- 
day with her daughter, Mrs. Adern 
Sorrell. 

Carl Anderson and wife were the 
guests of his father, Ed. Anderson. 
—When?— Ed. 

James Utz Harold and Leonard 
spent Sunday afternoon with Orvillo 
and Jim Ogden. 

Misses Susie and Rachel Utz en- 
tertained Miss Elizabeth Tanner, last 
Sunday afternoon. 

Bug Ogden and Chester Tanner 
filled their ice houses with nice ice 
during the last cold spell. 



Stephens and wife 

Raymond Ashcraft and wife en- 
tertained the young folks with a par- 
ty Saturday night. 

Hubert Clore and Harold Smi f h 
delivered their tobacco to Walton, 
last week and received good prices. ! Kramer,' Jno. n. r. lot No 68 

J. J. Stephens, who was formerly , Meyer, L J. n. r. lot No. 124 



Ruff, Henry 1 town lot $11,75 

Schuc, Jos. n. r. y» acre $3.09 

Florence Precinct 
Cole, Mrs. Eldora 5% acres $65.08 
Gorres Alfred n. r. Lot No. 22 $4.83 
Geirach, E. H. 7 acres land $129.39 

$3.61 
$4.08 



V!2i e £ °j I PUC £ but Wh ° 1,V " Stephens, Ben Est town lot 

ed with his daughter, Mrs. Lutie Ay- 1 Sw im, Allen n. r. lot No. 21 

lor, of Uwrencebnrg^Ind., the last > Rouble Lmbr. Co. lot No 



few years, died hist Wednesday, Jan 
9th, and was brougnt here and bur- 
ied Friday in the family grave yard 
by the side of his two wives why 
preceded him to his grave. He leaves 
three children two brothers, one sis 
ter and many -other friends and rel 



$4.99 
$4.51 
7 Ken- 
$3.70 



ton-Boone 

Hamilton Precinct 
Walton, Oliver 30 acres land $16 39 

Petersburg- Precinct 

Edwards, Claude town lot $15.89 

Gordon Henry n. r. town lot $16.27 



vci biiu lUBny-oiner inenas ana rei- ~ ~ — * •■• -. ™ 

atives to mourn his death, who have HoU8e » Grant town lot $12.31 

Randall Heirs 97 acres land $231.38 



our heartfelt sympathy. 



$13.06 
$24.83 



(Too Late for Last Week.) 

Zero, high water, whoopng cough 
and chicken-pox setm to be the order 
of the day here. 

A fiery cross was burned here on 
the hill New Year's eve, lighting up Napier, ChesT'ii. r 
the village beautifully. 

E. L. Stephens has bought M. B. : Vallandingham, K. K. n. r. 33*acres 
Rices store, and will take possession land $15.41 



Shinkle, Fritz 4 acres land 
Swing, Sarah Est., 12-a land 

Union Precinct 
Kennedy, J. W. n. r. 20 acres $11.74 

Vero»a Precinct 

Hageman, Pearl n. r. 14 acres $9.43 
10 town lots 
$12.0 



last Thursday Misses Hettie Rouse 
and Ada Aylor of Florence, and Mrs. 
Grace Carpenter and daughter, of 
Cincisnati. 

Miss Rhoda Eggleston and Miss 
Elizabeth Tanner stayed with Mrs. 
C. E. Beemon several nights laat 
week, on aecount of the ice bern?3c" 
bad in the creek. 



Alton Buckler has been on tEF 
sick list. 

August Drinkenburg butchered 
hogs Wednesday. 

Charlie Wilson was the guest of 
Hubert Beemon and family, Sunday. 

Clem Kendall called on Milton 
Beemon and wife, Sunday evening. 

Adern Sorrell and wife were the 
guests of Leslie Sorrell and wife, of 
Florence, Sunday. 

Charlie Wilson, of Ludlow, will 
leave Thursday for a two week's stay 
at St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Hubert Beemon found between his 
house and Limaburg Tuesday morn- 
ing a boys rubber, good as new. 

Bill Drinkenberg and sister Rosi, 
Jack Holt and Alliewilda Beemon 
attended the dance at Jas. Shep- 
herd's Saturday night. 



Geo. B. Miller, Secretary of the 
Tri-State Fox Hunter's Association, 
backed by the live wire firm of Nor- 
ris t Brock, of Cincinnati, attende 1 
the Executive Council meeting at 
Lexington, Ky., Jan. 10th, and tried 
to secure the National Fox Hunter 
meeting for Boone county, but Bow 
ling, Green, Ky,, was decided on to 
be held Nov. 17th, 1924, and Robert 
J. Breckinridge headed the delega- 
tion to lunch. 

More coal wns mimd in Canada in 
thit year jUHt ended than in any oth 
■•ar in Um history of the coun- 
try. 



this wetk. 

Harry and Ruth Carlyle have re- 
turned home after spending Xmas 
with friends in Seymour, Ind. 

Mrs. Annie Ryle entertained the 
young folks with a play party and 
dance, one night during the holidays. 
All reported a good time. 

Word has been received here of 
the illness of Mr. James Stephens cf 
Lawrenceburg, Ind. 

There wtre fewer people in Rab- 
bit Hash Saturday on account of the 
severity of the weather than had 
been for some time. 

Mrs. Herman Kyle takes over the j 



NOTICE 
To Delinquent Members of Breeders 
Mutual Fire and Lightning In- 
surance Company: 

Members who owe assessments ar« 
hereby notified that unless such as- 
1 sessments are paid within the next 
thirty days legal steps will be taken 
to collect same. By order of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

F. H. ROUSE, 

Secretary. 



the 



\, 



local ttlephone exchange for 
coming year. 

Fay and Denzil Conner spent the 
week-end with their aunt, Mrs. Maud 
WaltoiL 

Irene and Wilma Scott, Mildred 
Hodges, Helen and Coreta Rice and 
May Wilson, Raymond, Paul and 
Wilber Acra, Leonard Riggs and Rob- 
ert H. Wilson, spent Thursday ev- 
ening with Mrs. Ida Conner and en • 
joyed several hours of Victrola mu- 
^sic. 

beaveS^uck. 

and Mrs. J. O. Griffith spent 
last Thursday in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Delehaunt 
spent last Saturday in the city. 

Young lambs are making their 
pearancc in the flocks of some 
tiie she^p raisers. 

The Christian church Missionary 
Society met with Mr. and Mrs. A. A. 
Roter, last Thursday. 

Miss Sarah Hughes and Miss Kate 
Sleet are at Enterprise, Fla. They 
report the weather fine there. 

Mr. Will Wilson delivered 950 
pounds of tobaccb at Walton last 
Wednesday and received an ad vane J 
of $12.00 per hundred on it. 

Harry Rich and W. C. Johnson 
delivered their crop of 620 pounds 
Of tobacco to the pool at Walton 
last Wednesday and they received 
an advance of $6.80 per hundrtd on 
it. 



%Mg* M% sal— sTa will do what we 

Meaicine dam. ^ u- 

rld your system of Catarrh or Deafness 
caused by Catarrh. 

Sold Sv JiuMMtMi far ov*r 40 msts 

F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, Ohio 

DEVON 

C D Carpenter has been quite ill 
with blood poisoning but is improv- 
ing nicely. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank McCoy were 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bassett 
Wednesday. 

Mrs. Jos. Schadler who had he.* 
eye removed at Dr. Murphy's hospit- 
icely. 

Robert Perry, of 
guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. Morton Perry and family, Sat- 
urday night and Sunday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vance P. Marquis 
and children were guests of his par- 
ents in Ludlow Saturday evening, 
c id Mrs. MarqUis and children visit- 
ed her parents in Winton Phtee, Cin- 
cinnati, on Monday. 

Our little town was visited by 
burglars Sunday night, and made l 
clean sweep of, all the tools of the 
ersrage of Wm. Woodward * Son. 
We sympathise with Will and Robt. 
and hope the guilty parties may be 
brought to justice. This was quite 
a loss, as Mr. Woodward had pur- 
chased the best of tools. 



* nt Mrs. Jos. Sena* 
""v eye removed at Di 
nt ^^.l, is improving ni 

\Mr. and Mrs. 

„» Covington, were g 



MAKES DELICIOUS ROLLS, BISCUIT AND BREAD 

OUR GEM FLOUR 

HIGH GRADE WINTER PATENT. 
2—98 Pdund Bags Delivered to your 
Station for 



uARUS FLOUR 

The Highest Grade Soft Winter Wheat Milled 
on this market. 

Bbl. in wood $7.50; 2-89 lb. bags $7.00 

Delivered to your Station. 



Northern Kentucky's \ ^SSil^S^A 



27- 29 PIKE ST-20W7ttSr O0V.KY 



!W!iy,- ^:il^iJi^an\ii,iiinn l i;iiiii:iiMi!i l iinii;11iT]T]Tnrr)i.i';]ii 




Oroccr*- SceJemaL 



THTTMTrartlll 



m 
m 
S 

S 

3 



VULCANIZING. 

Complete line ot Goodyear, Goodrich and Kelly- 
Springfield Tires and Tubes, good Grade of Auto- 
mobile and Tractor Oils and Greases. 

Auto Accee**>riea kept v* stock. 

GEORGE PORf ER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 



S 



Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Jan. 19th 

THOS. DIXON Author of "Birth of a Nation" 

"The Mark of the Beast" 

ALL STAR COMEDY: 

"HELPFUL HOGAN" 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 

Friday Night, Jan. 18th 



CHILDREN 10c. 



ADU LTS' 25c 



War Tax Included Will Begin promptly at 760 



■GREAT- 



Reduction Sale 

NOT A MAKE BELIEVE BUT AN HONEST 
TO GOODNESS SALE. PRICES REDUC- 
ED ON ALL 

SUIT3 AND OVERCOATS 

Mtokinaws, Coat Swtattrs, Pullovers, Knta 
Pants and Corduroy Goods. 

If you are in need of clothing take advantage of the bar- 
gains we are offering in this sale. 



A 



Selmar Wachs 



605 Madison Avenue, 



COV INGTON, KY. 



^P! 



BOONE 



CO, UNTY 3EC0RDIR 



Walton Bank & Trust Co. 

Report of the condition of The Walton Bank & Trust Co., doin* 
te*«b»eas at the town of "Walton, County of Boone, State of Kentucky 
/ at the close of business on 31st day of December 1923. 

RESOURCES 

L*ans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured 

Sleeks, Bonds and other Securities 

Due from Banks 

xOaah on hand . .'. 

Banking H""**; Fuml*""" »nd Fixtures. 

©♦her Assets not included under any of above heads 



319,122,"8 
1,767.93 
31,644. 98 
17,680.80 
4,467.49 
3,000.0V 
4,000.00 



ToUl 381,623.03 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash '. 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and taxes paid '. 

Deposits subject to check 140,912.13 

Demand Certificates of Deposit 15* 605^71 



50,000.00 

10,000.00 

2,446.04 



Hebron Deposit Bank. 

Report of the condition of The Hebron Deposit Bank, doing busi- 
ness at the town of Hebron, County of Boone State of Kentucky at the 
close of business on 31st day of December 1923. 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured . 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 

Banking House, Furniture &. Fixtures 



PACE 



$90,092.47 



21,079.99 
7,961.44 
2,615,66 
3,800.00 



Total 



126,549.45 



Citizens Deposit Bank 

Report of the condition of The Citizens Deposit Bank, doing busi 
ness at the town of Grant, County of Boone, State of Kentucky at the 
close of business on 31 at day of Dec. l'.)23. 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured . . 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 

Banking House, Furniture ami Fixture*.... 



87,349.2$ 
89.41 

79,77S.»C 
9,526J& 

3,4 ** jam. 

l,34».lf» 



Bills Payable 

Other Liabilities not included under any of above heads. 



Total 



299,417.84 

10,000.0 i 

9,660.05 

381,523.9;; 



STATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF BOONE 

We, R. C. Green and A. R. Johnson President and Cashier of the abov» 
named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to th* 
best of our knowledge and belief 

R. C. Green, President. 
„ r .. A - R. Johnson, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of Jan 1924 
My Commission Expires Jan. 23rd, 1926. 

T. F. Curley, Notary Public. 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash 20 000 00 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses an-i taxes paid 

Deposits subject to check 43 393.73 

Demand Certificates of Deposit .1. . ..57',870.82 

Unpaid Dividends 



3,500.00 
184.90 



101,264.5' 
600.00 



125,549.45 



The Union Deposit Bank. 

Report of the condition of The Union Deposit Bank, doing bu« 
at the town of Union, County of,rBaw Z:~l« of Kentucky at 
clese of business on 31st day of December, 1923. 



sines-; 
the 



RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured 

■ Stocks, Bonds and other securities 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 



Total 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash . . r 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and taxes paid. 

Deposits subject to check 

Time Deposits 



43,004.90 
.34,462.23 



Bills Payable 
Total . . . 



102.213.4J 

1,442.24 

10,000.00 

8,655.80 

2,532.14 

124,843.59 



20,000.00 

10,000.00 

2,376.46 



77,467.13 
15,000.00 

124,843.59 



Total 

STATE OF KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BOONE 

We Hubert Conner and Lee Nora Graves President and Asst. Cashier 
of the above named Bank, do solmnly swear that the above statement is 
true to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

Hubert Conner, President. 
„ . .. Lee Nora Graves Asst. Cashier 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of Jan 1924 
My Commission Expires Dec. 5th, 1927. 
Chas. W. Riley, Notary 

Votary Public. 



Total 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock, paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and and taxes paid 

Deposits subject to check 48,802. H7 

Time Teposits 1 02,62.1.24 



181,51L0<r> 

15,00OJ*> 

10,000.o* 
5,082.8> 

151,428.1 r 



TotaI '• lftl,ULt» 

STATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF BOONE 

We, W. B. Rogers, and Jno. Clor \ President and Asst. Cashier of th* 
above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is 
true to the best of our knowlege and belief. 

W. B. Rogera, Prtsid' 1st 

John Clore, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 7th day of Jan. 1924. 
My Commission Expires April 20, 1925. 

C. E. McNeelv Notary Public. 



STATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF BOONE 

We, Ezra A Blankenbeker and 3. L. Fraiier, Presidents and Ca « 
*f the above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement 
is true to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

Ezra A. Blankenbeker, Presidert 
J. L. Frazier, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before 1927. 
My Commission Expires Jan. 5th, 20th, 1926 

W. M. Rachal, 
Notary Public. 



Florence Deposit Bank. 

Report of the condition of The Florence Deposit Bank doing busi 
ness at the town of Florence County of Boone, State of Kentucky at 
the close of business on 31st day of Dec. 1923. 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities.-? 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 

Checks and other cash items 

Banking House, Furniture & Fixtures 



Boone County Deposit Bank. 

Report of the condition of The Boone County Deposit Bank, daiac 
business at the town of Htirlinjrton County of Bo.ono, State of Kentucky 
at the close of business on 3 1st da ' of Dec. 1923. 



RESOURCES 



294,996.11 

64 2.? 6 

17,606.81 

24,499.38 

3,742.61 

80.00 

3,761.00 



Total 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and taxes paid . 

Deposits snbject to check 127,933.08 

Time Deposits 135[822!43 

Bills Payable 



345,328.29 

15,000.00 

25,500 00 

7,265.70 



263,755.51 
33,807.08 



Loans and Discounts. . 
Overdrafts, secured and 
Stocks, Bonds and othei 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 

Banking House, Furniture 



unsecure'i 
Securities 



d F\tt 



Total 



LIABILITIES 



Capital Stock, paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses an 1 taxes paid 

Deposits subject to check 152,673.61 

Demand Certificates of Deposit 133,290.51 



204,>J5.32* 

43.fr. 

133,698.00 

29,402.8i 

7,1128.9'J 

l.QX* 

375,964.12 

.".o.ooo.t 

5o,ooo.oe* 

10,000.0* 



285,964.12 



375,964.12 



345,328.2;.' 



Erlanger Deposit Bank. 

Report of the condition of The Erlanger Deposit Bank, doing . 
aeas at the town of Erlanger, county of Kenton, State of Kentucky at 
taw close of business on 31st day of December 1923. 

RESOl RCES 



bus ; - 



Loaas and discounts ^g 7 g, ^ 9 - 

Overdrafts, Secure J »„u unsecured ' \ ' 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities '" 

Due from Banks 

Cash en hand 

Backing House, Furniture and Fixtures 



Total 
~~'.TZ C7 KENTUCKY, CCL... OF BOONE 

We, C. F. Blankenbeker and J. C. Renaker, President and Cashier 
the above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement 
true to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

C. F. Blankenbeker President 
c . , J- G. Renaker, Cashier 

Subscribed and sworn to beforr me this 9th day of Jan 1924 
My Commission Expires Jan 10th, 1926. 
J. F. Murray, Notarv Public. 



lit 



of 



Total 

STATE OF KENTUCKY. COUNT 1 SATE OF KENTUCKY 

We, N\ E. P.iddell and \V. D. Crop per I'r.siknt and Cashier of the 
above named Bank, do solemnly swtar that the above statement 
true to the best of our knowledge a«. . belief. 

Jn ™. uiddell, President. 
W. D. Cropper, Cashier. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 8th day of Jan. 1924. 
My Commission Expires Jan. 15, 1925. 

G. S. Kelly, Notary Public 



Farmers Bank 



1,027.76 

4,400.00 

65,689.44 

10,470.7.1 

2,001. CO 



Total 



LIABILITIES 

Capita] Stockpaid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

••divided Profits less expenses and taxes paid ....... 

Deposits subject to check '. 168,244 47 

TMse Deposits 378[379!.57 



651,202 90 

50,000.00 

49,000.00 

5,578.86 



546,624.01 



Equitable Bank and Trust Co. 

Report of the condition of The Equitable Bank & Trusts Co doin • 
business at the town of Walton, Boone County, Stale of Kentucky 
at the close of business on 31 day of Dec. 1924. 

RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unsecured .......'. 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities ' 

Due from Banks 

Cash on hand 

Banking House, Furniture & Fixturts 

Other Assets not jncluded under any of above heads State 

Warrants 



Total 



651,202.90 



ToUl < 

JSTATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF BOONE 

5 W t" P rice , and R. T - Conner President and Cashier of the abov* 
noaaed 1 Bank do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the" 
best *f our knowledge and belief. 

W. A. Price, President 
a . .. B- T. Conner, Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day of January 1924 
Mr Commission Expires Jan. 5th, 1924. 

W. H. Folmer, 
_______ ' Notar y Public Kenton County, Ky. 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and taxes paid...... ' 

Deposits subject to check 150 514 96 

De p° sits .....'..'.'.'.'. ^.Ws? 



Time 

Notes and Bills Rediscounted 



Total 



4U5.799.70 

' 3,972.30 

26.672.CL 

33.522.9P 

6,386.61 

3,000.00 

66,732.!8 

546,087.20 

50,000.00 

10,000.00 

745.6. 



435,341.53 
50,000.00 

546,087.20 



Report of the condition of The Farmers Bank, doing business at the- 
i town ,>f 1 ct-isburg, County of Boon.- Sme. of Kentucky at the close or 
• business on the 31st day of Dec. J92o. 

RESOURCES 

j Loans and Discounts ' 

0*, e..!ii. its, secured and up: ecurtd. 

i Stocks, Bonds and other Securities 

Due from Banks : . . . . . 

Cashm"" hand 

Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures 



139,352,71 

130.5T 

52,758.5tt 
8,754. 9X 
2,096.45 
1,4 00.00- 



Total 



RESOURCES 

in, in cash 



Capital Stock, paid 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses and taxes paid 

Deposits subject to check 44,634.66 

Sime Deposits 116,666.85 



Bills Payable 



204,493. nr 

1 5,000.00 < 
15,000.00-. 

3,191.6:?. 



161,301.5! 
10,000.00>. 



?r of 



The Verona Bank. 

J^*°fi °J the c °n<*it«>n of The Verona Bank, doing business at the 
-Ty ot Verona County of Boone State of Kentueky at the close of 
*"«« on 31st day ot December 1923 

: RESUURCHS : 



and discounts 

Ovaadraf ts, secured and unsecured 

Sleeks, Bonds and other Securities 

Mm from Banks 

dbaa on hand 

BMUuing House, Furniture and Fixtuers. 



Tetal 



LIABILITIES 



157,61^.02 

262.2'1 

21,715.83 

9,446.91 

2.526.28 

2,300.00 

193,768.211 



15.000.UO 

14,000.09 

162.77 



193, 768. 2i 



fetfcaj Stack paid in, in cash 

atrplua Fund [ '.".'.'.'.,' .'.'.' .'.'.'.'.' 

VMIvMed Profit*, less expenses and ta.tes' paid. 

Parasite subject to check fa* ift.77 

TS»» OoposiU. 95,932.74 

earner J Ohec+s outstanding 1R7 AQt c. 

BMe Pavablf 10*,WJ&.&1 

W rayawe 7,600.00 

T*tal , 

SJATE OF KENTUCKY 
COUNTY OF BOONE 

We. W. M. Whitoon an4 O. K. Whitson, Pseiudeut and Cashier 
Mte above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the abeve statement 
tr«*t to fee best of our knowledge and Belial. 

W. M. Wtutsoa, President. 
«.j^— iv^i . . ° K Whiteon, Cashier, 

^•scribed and sworn to torfore me this 5th day of January 1924 
sty Commission Expire* Feb. 19. 192*. 

A C. Roberta Notary Public. 



STATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF BOONE 

We D. B. Wallace and H. E. Metcalfe President and Asst. Cashiei 
the above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above named state 
ment is true to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

D. B. Wallace, President 

M „ n ^ • H. E. Metcalfe Asst. Cashier 

My Commission Expires Jan. 24, 1926. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me the 3rd dav of Jan 1924 
John C. Miller, Notary Public. 



Peoples Deposit Bank 



Total 204,493.14' 

STATE OF KENTUCKY. COUNTY OF BOONE 

We, Wm. Stephens, Persident and B. E. Stephens Asst. O&shier of the- 
above named Bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is^ 
true to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

Wm. Stephens, President 
„,.,.,, B E - Stephens, Asst. Cashier. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this 5th day ef January 1924. ' 
My Commission Expires March \fi 1924. 

0. S. Watte, Netery Public 



Report of the condition nf The Peoples D e posit Bunk, doing buamer 
the town of Burl mrton. Bonn* Tm,.,*,, «*„*.. ...■ v. 7 ""*""" 



at the town of Burlington, Boone County, 
close of business on 31st day of Dec. 1928. 



RESOURCES 

Loan* and Discounts 

Overdrafts, secured and unseeuredTT 
Stocks, Bonds and other Securities. . 

Due from Bants 3 

Cash on hand 

Checks and other cash items [-;•; 

Puck tig House, Furniture & Fixtuures . 



State of Kentucky at the 



of 

i« 



Tetal 



LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund ; 

Undivided Preftts, less expenses' ano taxes paid 

Deposits subject to check 

Time Deposits 



164,147.40 
374,870.99 



4'$*.:u>2.<;: 

108.13 

196,089.75 

54,790.03 

6,797. 9S 

2,15i'.tf5 

2.0') 

i9f,34#.3fi, 

.•0.000 .10 

100 uoo.oo 

§,321.116 

6;{y,oi8.}«i 



Citizens Bank of Erlanger. 

Report of the condition of Th^ Citizens Bank deibfr •usaaees at thn> 
town of Erlanger, County of Kenton State of Kentucky at aW elose ,>t 
business on 31st day of Dec. 1923 

RESOURCE* 

Loans and Discounts 

OvcrdrcfU, .-<?cured and unsecured 

Stocks, Bonds and other Securities 

Due from Banks . :_: ~ ! ^" 



l«M73.S-r 

!, 581.10 

5 g, 612 .Qi ] t 



Cash on hand 

Checks and other cash items 

Banking House, Furniture and Fix mi res. 
Improvement Fuad 



~Total 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock, paid in, in cash 

Surplus Fund 

Undivided Profits, less expenses an I taxes 

Deposits subject to check 

Time Deposits 



paisi. 



litt.iMI3.8f 
59,728. Ot 



Cashiers Check-- outstanliug. 
BiMs Payable 



W.363.04 
6,871.73 • 
603.01 
K.QOO.OQ ' 

HjOUO.Oyv. 

$a€9, 894.6? 

ie.Ooo ao 

.' 6.000.00 

l-,279.?« 



2«a,(J15.:!i. 
6:1.49* 

25 ma.vt. 



61»R.34C 35 



* 



*** ^^f '" , ,orkiddo " «« ln -' Taking time by ta. lare.ock wU a 

intarpittag fact good old adage until the herae went 

out of 



you bad probably overlooked. 



A »Utoa ia Ume may «v» nns, bia Lpt, of people taaa vaaat u, rL. 
H woat -v. nnf .Wine. .^ . JJff JftiTlSl 



Total 
STATE OF KENTUCKY. COUNTY OF BOONE. 

We, C. H. Youell and A. B. Ronaker President and Cashwr ml h^ 

t^to n *thr 1 bes B ; D f , do t o,e, T!f ,4wear that ,h * ^-: ^:, i ;: f Ilt i • 

irue to the best of our knowledge and belief. 

C. H. Youell, President 

0..4. jw A. B. Renaker. Cashier 

bufcsoribed and sworn to before n.e this 7th day .,/ I 
My Commiasion Expires Jan. 8th, 1984. 
N. H. Martin, Notary Public. 



Total 
STATE OF KENTUCKY, COUNTY OF KENTON 

We. K. H. Blankenbeker and C. T Bnvis Presidtut a 
above uamed Ban*, do s,leiuul,v ^i r that the sfov. rfca* 
true to the b«»st of our tUiewMage -nd belief. 

t. H. RliuJ*. 
,...., C T. Dsvia. 

&UDscribed and sworn to be fen m- -.hie 
My Comiuiaaion Expp-vs Murch:", I92€. 

L. A. Bentler.N'ota: v I'uta'u K 



'J»ft,T446l 

id CfenkaH- »».* tfte- 

j*e:it \% 



•-hie l.'rfa 



:'U-V.. 

CnaaWe 

s»;»y «»f ffn. 



Se«). 



24f. 



.entyii t*»».:i>tvV, Ky. 



' 



l!>24. 



The buck private bj Uncle SamV 
ariay in gvin* to have 



The faUaa who dnnl 



6 and 



patiU and of booae that si avaiUble ne^adavs 

but nothing .». y be thankful that tharr J * mu y. 

« «li» between the csp and (be *>.»• 



RECEIVING MULES 

Kcx Berkahire had dtiiveiod 
hn.i by tr;u!; V ne day la 1 rt ,.,.k ., 
pau of work muU n he boviabt .. 
John Lunher, of m-itr Ksatngjr Rv\ 
thinks there are ue farm 
lika iiiuUs. 



•«» been faund ta watok aim. 



BY TRUCK 



anirgdl 



Wo lit u lot *f ntlltl beklg df 

llvei-»>d (• market tsu aast »r»k 



HVodi I nil pound* af -Mg-nrkafa 

food nntriNl te (Ke dairy eew reUiaam 

IS pound* ot human. rO«d sotid^. taW 

ao^ lo.ti i'ojd.Im, Ihv 'ijwar 2.U 

1 hi laaep 2.6 paiuid* 



Taa MM moo likes ta be a 

duva in a ataall puddla, gmnmr, 
'01 ay.is" ta* mum «f as* Luuie t 
•"« K# ](••-• tt» tan e*v 



m. 



mmmmmmmwmmm 



mm 



mm 



T 



mmm 



T 



we» 



„»ACE EIGHT 



B00NT3 COUNTY RECORDER 



THE CARE OF THE BABY 



by 



milk 

how 



How soon *hall I feed the 
after his birth? 

Every four hours until th( 
comes in the breast. After thn 
often shall he nurse? 

Every three hours, during the day 
6 9 12 3 fi, and at 1) and 2 at night, 
by the clock. After the fifth month, 
every four hours. 

How long shall I let him nurse'.' 
20 minutes. 

Suppose he is asleep at feeding 
time, shall I wake him? 

Yes, so he will form regular habits 
of feeding. Soon he will wake at 
the right time. 

If the baby cries before feeding 
time, what shall I do, 

Give him warm boiled water, put 
nothing in it 

Will it not do to ?: : J . lim a little 
earlier if he cries? 

No, he must be fed regularly by 
the clock. 

Is he not too hungry? 
He will not be if you have enough 
milk. 

How will I know if he has enougn 
to eat? 

You can weigh him before and af- 
ter feeding. Look at your feeding 
chart and see how many ounces of 
milk he should have for his age. One 
ounce of milk weighs an ounce. 
Therefore, if he weighs two oueiu< 
more after feeding he has' taken 
two ounces of milk. 

Should I give him anything but the 
breast milk? 

No, absolutely nothing, unless -the 
doctor advises it. After the thiid 
month give from a teaspoonful to a 
tablespoonful of strained orange, or 
cooked tomato, or prune juice, dilut 
ed with equal parts of water. Prun.; 
juice is the water the prunes are 
soaked and boiled in, without sugar. 
Be sure to wash your hands be- 
fore preparing the baby's food. 

Keep flies away from the baby and 
his food at all times. 

The $75,000,000 State-bond issntr 
proposal, as advanced by Governor 
William J. Fields was explained in 
detail to the members of the Generpi 
Assembly sitting in joint session, on 
Monday afternoon, January 14, by 
speakers representing different in- 
terests which the bond issue is in- 
tended to benefit. 

Delegations from many parts of 
the State assembled in North Frank- 
fort and, attended by several bands, 
marched i a briody to the State Cap- 
itol to attend the Legislative session. 
Special trains were run from Louis- 
ville and Lexington. 

According to the message of the 
Governor, the proposed bond issue 
will be allotted to the following in- 
terests : 
Roads 

County Schools 
State University 
Penal and Charitable 
Institutions 
Normal Schools 
Negro Normal and In- 
dustrial Schools 
Geological burvey 
Tuberculosis Sanitaria 
Ky. School for blind 
Ky. School for Deaf 
State Floating Debt 

Total $75[00o!00O 

The present rate of taxation fo.- 
motor vehicle licenses, the 3c gen- 
eral property tax for road purposes 
and a gasoline sales tax raised from 
lc, the present rate, to 3c, will pro- 
duce ample revenue to support this 
total bonded debt and also to prop- 
erly maintain the roads. It is esti- 
mated these three sources of revenue- 
will yield a total of $5,900,000 in 
1925, when the proposed bond issue 
will become available and will, as 
result of greater use of motor ve- 
hicles, increase to $8,500,000 in 
1930, when construction of the roads 
will have been completed. Thero 
would be required each year for the 
bonded debt a total of $4,250,000 for 
sinking fund and interest — this in- 
terest at 4 V4 per cent. This would 
leave $1,650,000 for maintenance of 
the roads the first year of construc- 
tion under the bond issue, really 
about 50 per cent more than would 
be necessary for that purpose. fa 
1980 the increase in these sources 
of revenue would bring to the main- 




OLD-TIME* CALLS AT \VKIT£ HOUSE |8SS3XX5<{S3K:JCg3S<CaC"S&2C^55! 

ft 



FORD BATTERIES 



To Produce Winter Eggs 
Give Pullets Good Care 

"Finishing the "pullets" means get- 
Una the young stock in a condition 
which will allow theiu to go through 
the winter in good lieailth, produce a 
good number of egps and develop a 
lesistunee against disease, says \V. H. 
Allen, extension poultry specialist. New 
Jersey agricultural experiment station. 
The pullet is allowed to reach its 
maximum growth before it is permitted 
to lay eggs, la Leghorns thie will oc- 
cur when they are about five months 
old, and with the dual purpose breeds, 
such as Rhode Island Red and Ply- 
mouth Rock, it will take at least a 
month longer. The lighter breeds, 
such as the Leghorns, should weigh at 
least three pounds at time of condi- 
tioning, and the heavier breeds, like 
the Rhode Island Red, should weigh 
from four to four and a half pounds. 

The ration used in conditioning a 
flock consists largely of fattening 
foods, such as corn, wheat, oats and 
their by-products, with as little animal 
protein as possible. A i>'ooil scratch 
feed consists of equal parts of cracked 
corn and wheat. This is fed twice a 
day, approximately six to eight pounds 
per 1»H) birds at each feeding. 

A good mash for this period Is two 
parts of wheat bran, two parts of com- 
ment, two parts of ground oats, two 
parts of dour middlings, and one part 
of meat scrap. This mush is kept be- 
fore the pullets at all times. One hun- 
dred growing pullets eat Ave' to ten 
pounds of it a day. 

The conditioning period takes ap- 
proximately a month, two weeks on the 
range and two weeks in the laying 
quarters. As soon as the pull ets show 
signs of laying on the range, they are 
housed, and the same feed continued 
for two weeks before changing to a 
laying ration. 

When the pullets are housed they 
need Just as much green feed and ex- 
ercise as if still on the range. 

Oyster shells are kept where the 
birds can always get them. 




'* 



A car of 1903 arrived at the White House the other diry, after making 
the trip from Cedar Rnpids. Iowa, the driver, A. Scherff, carrying a message 
from the mayor of Philadelphia to the President. Scherff has covered 16 
states and hopes to make all the states before the first of the year, carrying 
messages from the different mayors and governors. 



$15.50 

Guaranteed One Year. 



Don't fail to give us a trial, for we have won- 
t ul values for your money in all size batteries. 

Recharge- — Battery Repair 



MOTOR TROUBLES 
DUE TO POOR OIL 



LEGITIMATE USE OF CHAINS 



"Medium" Lubricator Scorched 

Under Friction and Permitted 

Bearings to Go Dry. 



$50,000,00^ 
$5,000,000 
$5,000,00(1 

$5,000,003 
$2,000,000 

$1,00,000 

$400,000 

350,000 

150,000 

100,000 

$6,000,000 



t e nan ce fund $4,260,000, or about 
$1,000,000 more than necessary t.y 
maintain the system at the high rate 
Of $800 a mile a year. There would 
also then be available to the road 
fund annually an additional $1,000,- 
000 or more from Federal, aid. 

RED GROSS NEWS. 

Election of chapter officers was 
held at Florence Jan. 8th. Besides 
representatives from Richwood, Flor- 
ence, Hebron and Burlington, Mrs. 
White, the Field Representative, Mm. 
Klnzie the Kenton county secretary 
•Ad Mrs. Robinson, also of Kenton 
county, were present. Last year's of- 
ficers were re-elected — Mrs. B. F. 
Bedinger chairman, Galen Kelly 
Treasurer, Mrs. G. W. Tolin execu- 
tive secretary. Executive Board 

chairman-treasurer Judge Riddell 
Mr. W. H. Clayton, <Mrs. W. h! 
8mlth, Miss Emily Hughes, Dr. F. L. 
Sayre, Mr. A. Rogers. 



A more extensive program is plan- 
ned for next year, but the plans will 
not be perfected before the next 
meeting to be held in Februsry. 

All who have known Mrs. Whit- 
wUl regret greatly that she has re- 
tlyned a* Field Representative. 



1* invprlably 



The bhggest kicker 
tft« biggest loafsr. 



Find Sulpha r — '.I — I 

Remedy for Poultry Ills 

The argument of some ponltrymeu 
that sulphur Is harmful to fowls in 
wet weather Is declared by N. \V. San- 
born, poultry specialist of the Florida 
coll ege <>f agriculture, to he a mis- 
taken idea. In fact, the birds.- that 
hMve been given sulphur in their feed 
for some time are better able to stand 
long wet periods than they otherwise 
would be. 

The primary purpose for which sul- 
phur is recommended is to modify the 
attacks of sorehead, according to Dr. 
Sanborn. Sorehead — a disease of 
poultry that Is similar to measles 
which affect children, in that It never 
attacks the same bird more than once 
— Is considered one of the very worst 
troubles with which the Florida poul- 
tryman has to contend. Seme states, 
after conducting experimental tests 
with a number of remedies, have ad- 
vocated the inoculation of the poultry 
with- a serum. However, Florida has 
never conducted any such tests, but Its 
specialists have learned that sulphur 
Is a practical remedy. 

Dr. Sanborn recommends that the 
sulphur equal 1 per cent of the mash, 
with which It should be mixed. It is 
particularly recommended for growing 
chickens, serving normal* to modify 
the disease but also as a food. The 
sorehead attacks are only mild when 
sulphur is fed because the chicken's 
body and system are kept In a strong, 
healthy c ondition, 

Hopeless Task to Raise 
Young and Old Together 

Some place it is stated that It Is un- 
wise to put new wine In old bottles. 
A modern version would be that It la 
unwise to put young chicks In quar- 
ters occupied by- mature stock. It Is 
almost a hopeless task to raise young 
and old together. The conditions are 



not sanitary, the chicks are badly In 
fested with lice, and the hens get first 
chance at the feed. The chtfks get 
trampled under foot and what few live 
don't grow because they have little op- 
portunity to eat. 



Successful Poultryman 

Picks Choicest Fowla 

The poultry raiser who does best Is 
almost si ways the one who carefully 
picks out esch year only his choicest 
specimens and breeds from these ex- 
clusively. As s natural result, his 
flocks become better snd better each 
year. By the same token the man who 
Is breeding for heavy egg-production 
should plrfc ont his very best layers to 
be used as breeders, and In the course 
of s few generations the hsblt of pro- 
lificacy will become firmly established 
In this family. 



Henhouse Draft Brings 
on Many Poultry Diseases 

"Forestall a roup epidemic by stop 
ping up draft-producing openings It 
the henhouse," suggests O. L. Steven 
son, professor of poultry husbandry si 
the South Dakota Stst* college. "Plan 
ty of fresh air without drafts Is high 
ly desirable. I>r*fu snd dampnest 
produce colds, which run Into roup, 
pox, canker snd diphtheria. The all 
supply In s henhouse may be mor« 
readily controlled by having the «>uO 
equipped with vcsrtllsiur* 



(By KUW1N fiREER, President Or««r Col- 
lege of Automotive; Englnee rin«. Chicago.) 

• Let's take a typical case of the 
pace that kills. Your Eighty- Klght 
rolls out of the salesroom oil it's first 
i!,000 miles. Of course you drive pret- 
ty slowly on the first five hundred or 
thousand miles, so as not to burn her 
up. You watch the oil gauge and 
when It slides down the scale you stop 
at an oil station. And here's where 
you get into trouble. 

'•.Medium or light oil?" asks the oil 
man. "Medium," you say because 
"inctlium" sounds like a good aver- 
age. And then whatever brand of oil 
that particular station has Is poured 
Into your crankrase. 

Thin Came Musical Tap-Tap. 
All right. Let's go! Soon "Ji.OOO" 
clicks into place on the speedometer, 
so you let her out to discover what the 
big eight can really do. A rough over- 
tone sounds over the sweet purr of 
the motor, but you're hitting forty- 
five and are too busy to notice it. 
Then comes a hint of labor lnto_ the 
drone of the motor and then a musical 
tap-tap. And as you let the accelerator 
spring up from the floorboard the tap 
becomes a whack — and then — you 
have no one to blame but yourself. 
The $o0 bill the garage man hands you 
is the cost of a lesson In "Don't Just 
Say Oil." 

Here is what happened to the inside 
of the motor. It vras a beautiful job 
to start with — Joints cozy and bear- 
ings snug, to start with — but It was 
new metal, and surface ground against 
surface. Tiny filings washed off Into 
the oil and sank to the crankense. 
Some of the "medium" oil you pur- 
chased was poor stuff that scorched 
under friction and permitted the 
bearings to go dry. Your car was de- 
signed with broad bearing surfaces of 
narrow clearance, calling for light oil. 
Medium oil was the same as a fat man 
trying to squeeze through an elevated 
train— neither are built for the work. 
The bearings got hotter and wore 
away quickly, dropping still more fil- 
ings down Into the oil below. 

Dust came In through the breather 
tubes snd the air intake, carbon be- 
gan to accumulate, and as the motor 
was never again given a good clean- 
ing out, there formed In the reservoir 
s sandlike mixture of oil, metal and 
various kinds of grit. And when you 
let her out the motor sent In sn emer- 
gency call for more oil and the pump 
obeying flushed the friction surfaces 
with a sickly mush until finally a 
wrist-pin began to shriek. 

Use Beat OH and Qrsasss. 
If only every motorist would keep 
his car supplied with best oil snd 



Hany Drivers Find Ways of Overdoing 

Things ( and Get in Habit of 

Driving* Too Fast. 

Chains have their legitimate use, 
but as usual drivers find ways of over- 
coming it. The latest Is the habit of 
driving too fust. Even the chain man- 
ufacturers don't advertise that their 
articles wUl guarantee motorists 
against accidents, but drivers seem to 
have a notion that the chains justify 
greater speed. As a matter of fact, 
the chains simply make the normal 
speed of the ear for wet weather safe. 
If 15 to 20 miles an hour Is the limit 
for wet weather driving the chains will 
make this speed practically safe. But 
If the driver clips off SO miles per 
hour or over he must remember that 
In event of need for a quick stop con 
ditions are about the san/e as though 
he were caught going 20 miles per hour 
without chain protection. Too much 
confidence in chains Is like getting 
careless with the gasoline Just because 
there's a fire extinguisher In the car. 



DEVICE TO AVOID SKIDDING 



Simple and Inexpensive to Manufac- 
ture and Prevents Detachment 
-of Chains. 



The Scientific American In Illustrat- 
ing and describing anti-skid device, 
the Invention of C. F. A. Nuebllng of 
Hewlett, L. U-ttV-xVsa y g ; . 

An object .of the Invention Is to pro- 
vide a construction In which accident- 
al detachment of the cross chains 




Antl-Skld Device. , 

from the side chains will be prevent- 
ed. Another object Is to provide a 
connection between the side and cross 
chains by means of which said chains 
may be readily detached from each 
other. The device Is simple and Inex- 
pensive to manufacture. 



STEP ON STARTER IF CAUGHT 



greases adapted to It, 90 per cent of 
motor troubles would disappear. 

Peculiar, too, Isn't it, when you 
come to think about It? Here you go 
and put half a year's Income Into a 
car and then neglect to give It the 
proper lubrication. Oosh, it's the em- 
bodiment of every principle known to 
mechanics, from high tension to hy- 
draulics; it's the peak of standard 
perfection. With real case the normal 
life of a motor car In from fifty to a 
hundred thousand miles and It may 
be much longer than that. But at 
thousand miles It has reached 
dangerous age and will begin to 
It's wild oats if it Is not carefully 
watched. At twenty thousand It la 
rapidly stoking Into senile debility. 
Man, you eaa't break the command- 
menu and stay young, not without a 
tot of expensive- repairs, anyhow. 

So use the beat oil there la— It's the 
cheapest in the long run. 



Few Motorists Realise What a 8ouroe 

of Emergency Power Electric 

Device Can Be. 

Few motorists realise what a source 
of emergency power an electric starter- 
motor can be. 

When caught on railroad tracks with 
a stalled motor the thing to do is to 
place the gears In "second" and step 
on the starter. The car will move off 
the tracks slowly but surely, and In 
half the time that would be required 
tn crank the motor Some stsrtars 



CROSSING RAILROAD TRACKS 



•peeding Up and Coasting Is Danger- 
ous Ivan if Clear View Is 
Had From Bead. 

Crossing railroad tracka by speed- 
lag up snd coasting Is dangerous, even 
If a clear view of the track Is had 
from the road. The crossing may be 
rougher than It looks, or there may 
be more of an upgrade than appears 
at first glance snd ths momentum of 
the car can be quickly dissipated. 



make so much noise that a train 
couldn't be heard approaching while 
the motor is being cranked. 

A practice of relying on the starter- 
motor, of course, Is a good way to 
get acquainted with the repair shops, 
but It It assumed that suiting on rail- 
road crossings Is not s habit Many 
abuses of the car are justifiable In. 
an emergency; the point is to know 
what ones can be relied upon aa life 
ssrars. 



.MEWaT. 



There are about 12.000,000 sutomo- 
bllea la the world, and about 10,000,000 
of them In the United States. 

• • • 

An automobile piloting device has 
been invented by a former army offi- 
cer to guide small balloons used to 
distribute advertising matter as they 

anil across country. 

• • • 

A New Orleans Inventor's gasollu* 
economize/ for low priced aotomo 
kites Is featured by a bar of copper 
that la expanded by the engine heat 
to control the now of fuel. 

• • e*y - 

Automobile tourist travel scross the 
United Htates la heaviest over the cen 
trui routes, namely, ths Lincoln high 
wag. the National Old Trails road 
the Yettow stone trail. 



H 



Dempsey Motor Car Co., 

ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

Phone Erl. 70-L 



EaaSKX^Rr^aSf.^^ 



C. Scott Chambers 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

OF 

SERVICE, TENDERNESS 
AND ALERTNESS. 



m 



Printed 



for business people. 

for professional people. 

tor farmers. 

Q r 72 h i r\ rj o kw for every one who wants 

/_■ ! W V -/ to be considered up to 

at this office date and going strong 

ENVELOPES, LETTERHEADS, NOIEHEADS, STATEMENTS 



ill 



SEE OUR 1924 



HUDSON & ESSEX MODELS 

All Essex are 6-Cylinder and built by the 
HUDSON MOTOR CAR CO. 



Hudson Sedan 2,020.00 

Hudson Coach 1,585.00 

Hudson Speedster 1,470.00 

Hudson 7 Passenger $1,525.00 

Essex Coach 6-Cylinder 1,060.00 

Essex Touring 6-Cylinder 930.00 

Above prices are delivered. 

B. HUME, 

25 E. Fifth St., C v/ington, Ky. 



RARGAIIV: 



Cincinnati Daily Enquirer 



■AND— 



The Boone County Recorder 



YOU CAN GET 



bom lor $5.00 1MEAR 



Send Your Subscriptions to the 

BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



Burlington, Ky. 



t 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦>♦♦♦••♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ —* 



ABE YOU A READEK OP THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 

iTOon't Parti to R«MMl All Tha Ada in I tils. Isssiuai.fjgi 
♦>♦♦♦>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ »♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.. «,♦>♦,« 




— 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER. 



Vo*. XXXXVI I I I 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 1924 $1.50 Per Year 



No I4r 



WASHINGTON COMMENT. 

The coming to a close of the great 
erposition of roads and road build- 
ing apparatus and methods in Chi- 
cago, in which good roads every- 
where were stressed as the outstand- 
ing need of the country for the 
greatest benefits of education, social 
intercourse, economics and civiliza- 
tion, turns attention to the many 
new developments in modern life, all 
emphs&iucu tj ..1'iCV'o, v-oiiVer>lI»ns, 
expositions. 

The automobile show, a yearly 
event in all the larger cities, how few 
are the years since it was a novelty! 
The pure food show, in which food 
manufacturers vie with one another 
in putting emphasis upon the purity 
of their products, the healthful con- 
ditons in which they are made, their 
sanitary ackages, is in sharp con- 
trast to the way in which the early 
food product factories fiught thj 
pure food law! Only in recent yean; 
has education entered the exposition 
field, but now a great school exhibit 
is yearly held in most cities, and ed- 
ucation associations and s oc i et i e s 
stage so many conventions, exhibi- 
tioss and public demonstrations of 
their progress it is hard to keep 
count of them. 

But as yet we have no national 
education exposition, although the 
great conventions of the N. E.A. 
and Education Week do much to fo- 
cus the public mind upon educational 
problems. Yet the time seems ripo 
for an education exposition, whicn 
shall be to the education world what 
the automobile show in New York 
is to that industry, what the road ex- 
position was to the highway builders 
what the motor boat and the aeron- 
autical shows, and the just begin- 
ning "wireless show" are to those in- 
dustries. 

For all of them — roads, automo- 
biles, food, ireless, boats depend on 
education; without education there 
are no buyers no users; without ed- 
ucation there can be no U. S.! 

WORLD UNIVERSITY FOR 

UNITED STATES PROPOSED 



IS THIS OLD WORLD CROWING 
BETTER? 



I 



Possible Initial Endowment One Mil- 
lion Dollars. 



Washington, D. C. — The proposal 
to establish in America a world uni- 
versity which has been discussed in 
educational circles for years, meets 
with new interest in the light of the 
offer of a San Diego financier to do- 
nate from three to five hundred 
acres of land near that California 
city for its use, and the proffer of a 
million dollar endowment from ■» 

Dr. Auguustus O. Thomas, Presi- 
dent of the World Federation of Ed- 
ucation Associations and Commis- 
sioner of Education in Maine, is 
authorized to appoint a committee 
to investigate the feasibility of the 
world university idea. Speaking of it 
he said: 

"Final decision of where the uni- 
versity will be established, as well as 
the question of whether or not it will 
be established at all, of course, will 
be made by the commission which I 
have been asked to appoint. It seems 
probable, however, that, since Amer- 
ican cagital will be used if the pro- 
ject is^torried through, it will be es- 
tablished in this country. 

"Barcelona, The Hague, San Diego, 
and one other city, which I am not 
now at liberty to name, have so far 
put in their bids to be the seat of the 
university. No other country, how- 
ever, in my opinion, would be as free 
from outside influence nor so fair 
in dealing with an international proo 
lem. of this character as the United 
States. 

As at present contemplated, the 
world university would receive be- 
tween 10 and 15 graduate students 
from each of the 72 countries of the 



worlp, forming a student body of 
approximately 1,000. 

"The university would be non-po- 
litical, nonprejudiced, and no n sectar- 
ian, and should -revolutionize the 
science of education." 



THE INCOME TAX GROWLERS. 



Some people have never adjusted 
themselves to the federal income tax. 
Every year when the blank comej 
along which they must fill out or sub- 
mit to severe penalties, they think 
some kind of an indignity has been 
done to them. 

Such folks should remember what 
the federal government does for us. 
It protects us from the assault of 
national enemies. In the mood in 
which Germanf was before the war, 
this country would have had to fight 
her years ago had it not been for ou 1 
military and naval ability. 

Most of our federal tayes go today 
to pay for the war male necessary 
by Germany's desire to rule the 
world. People who dislike to pay 
taxes to Washington, might other- 
wise have had to vay them to Ber- 
lin. 

The federal government promotes 
our food supply by developinv abri- 
eulture. It protects the manse* of 
the people against injustice and 
wrong in a thousand directions. It 
comes high, but we must have it. 



As my habit has been, I am writ- 
ing my usual contribution to the 
young readers of our county paper-- 
the Recorder, hoping in doing so thut 
a few truths of the compulsory laws 
of nature of "whatsoever you sow, 
that also you will reap," will be in- 
stilled into their minds and hearts 
for good, to spring up and bear fruit 
in after life. — some thirty, some six- 
ty and some a hundredfold to the 
honor and glory of perfect manhood 
and womanhood of the future, that 
our country, the county of all coun- 
tries, to us, will be proud to claim 
as Her children, borned and bred up- 
on her soil; all through the writer'; 
humble efforts for good. 

The question used as a subject. I 
think, is in every intelligent thinking 
readers mind just now, and, is the 
"better state of morality" caused by 
chance, If we were asked to an- 
swer these questions, probably the 
majority of us would answer in the 
affirmative to the first, and "no" to 
the second, without a moment's hes- 
itation, — but, can we prove it? Proof 
is what it takes to make our state- 
ments valid and "Legal Tender" now 
days. The subject has a world of 
thought wrapped in its composition 
for deeper and clearer intellectual- 
ity than the writer's, therefore, I 
cannot expect to do it justice — my 
aim in selecting such an important 
subject, is to start the wheels of the 
brighter, more cultivated intellects 
revolving, to give the rest of our in- 
ferior intellects a chance to recuper- 
ate and to bask in the realms of 
scientific research of the hidden facts 
of nature's laws, whicir isnrot only 
interesting but instructive. 

Shakespeare says in His "Seven 
Ager of Man," This world is but a 
stage — the events as a whole, is a 
drama or play, before the "Foot- 
lights" of creation — and we are the 
actors, who have a part to play, in 
this great life drama — an infant ju i. 
born and only living a few days, and 
then ret 5 . ~ Hither Earth ' 

and to the "Elements" from whence 
it came, we often say, if it were only 
going to live so short a time, why 
was it permitted to enter into life, 
in ) nil of trials nnd tribulations, to 
cause sorrow and heart anguish to 
the loved ones left behind? Th i 
Shakespearian Code hap it, it came 
to play and fulfill the part in the 
life drama, it was assigned, that only 
it, could fulfill, before making its 
final exit from the stage of life, our 
"footstool" tho, a small and insigni 
ficant a part to us, but none the less 
important to the alwise author and 
Instigator, of this great drama of 
life. S" then, we may assume, that 
the natura. events of life, are not by 
chance, but by a fixed natural law, 
ruled and governed by an omnipo- 
tent hidden power, which we canno'. 
always understand, such events, as 
has happened around us within four 
or five years. 

Can we understand how such a 
great universal monopoly of power, 
as the Liquor Traffic — thought by 
same, to be such a source of revenue 
for our government, was put out of 
commission by the weakest party 
power in the political field? Can yo i 
and I, understand how the "Women's 
Sufferage Alliance," composed of the 
weaker sex only, gained such an un- 
animous and gigantic victory for wo- 
men to vote in our elections, even to 
run for and hold such offices under 
the jurisdiction of our government, 
to protect their children from the 
wily politician and office grafter 
when it was so bitterly opposed by 
the united forces of manpower in 
the "Political Field!" 

Are these changes for the better, 
and by the weak and insignificant 
power of ninn? 1 think ThejTafe for 
the better, and by an alwise and 
omnipotent, unseen power, if so, thin 
old world, is nearing its finality, and 
fulfilling the Divine Decree, of beint, 



Reduction of Taxation 




/mmm 



Copyright, 19041 Nadoul Bodfc. Anodstios, Inc. 

THE NEW DOCTOR'S FIRST CALL 

It makes the patient sit up and hope he is going te> gat w»JL 



ceiver in 1901. He left office in 190T, 
and soon thereafter began his bank- 
ing career as cashier of the First 
National Bank. 

Mr. uiuwn demonstrated re marl: 
able financial ability from the first 
and his career has been one of steady ' 
advancement to the presidency of \ 
the National Bank of Kentucky. Dur- 
ing the war he was a member of th»* 
Capital Issues Committees of the 
War Fnance Board, and it was her* 
that he attracted the attention of 
Secretary McAdoo. 

The attitude of the Bingham pa- 
pers toward Mr. Brown gives pecu- 
liar interest to Mr. Brown's acquis- 
ition of the Herald. The Courier- 
Journal and the Times inherited pr.'s 
tige as liemocratic newspapers, b;>t 
since they were acquired by Judge 
Bingham they have? not shown much 
Democratic enthusiasm and ha>v 
been for the most part h tatil e to tht* 
Democ ratic organization and candi I- 
a'.es in the >:tal>'. 

Intense dislike .1!' ('ant nil ana 
failure to support Fields ami ih • 
ticket in the law election has been 
followed by the biter criticism of Mr. 
Brown and the Governor in connei 
tidn with the Tax Commission a 
I ■ intment. a 

Purchase of the Herald givt < Mr; 
Drown a newspaper of his own in 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 



LITTLE TOWNS TAKE NOTICE.. 



Every community should havs 
proper fire fighting apparatus. With. 
improved roads and automobile- 
equipment thorp is no excuse for any 
settlement to be without adequate- 
means of preventing tire loss. Too- 
mrr.y towns have, been relying uporr 
others to do {their 'fighting for them.. 
"The Fire Chief" in commenting >>tv 
this says: 

"Suburbs of certain cities ha*'*- 
in large number- been beating their 
way" to tire protection l>y relying in- 
on the generosity of large fire de- 
partments \o -avc them from de- 
struction it" a i'ue broke oat. The 
money thus saved which should have 
been .'.rent n pro} iding thei 
fire apparatus, they put In 

piXt.it. They ".'.anted Co tie! 
thing fox nothing. In hundx 
eases they succeeded. 

"But the large cities are getting 
tired of this kind of philanthropy. II 
any c o m mu nity; wan - ..- fire protec- 
tion, it . *i r\ t to be willing to pny 
for it." 



ov. r 
ih"ir 
umc- 

S 111" 



SOME TIME AGO. 



BANKS SPUD DOINGS IN OU) 

llfOPtKAfE 



the event Of continued hostility ff'iri 

the Bingham papers and places tha 

1 Herald erstwhile Republican organ, 

jt> the undoubted Democratic 

By Observer In Cincinnati Sun- ownership, with the Democracy oi 
j » c * * ne Cpurier-bournal and the Times 

_. . . „ ~ . _,. . , , . „ n -j . ' day * tl5< I u,rer - J seriously questioned bv state Demo- 

Eight Per Cent Dividend to Be Paid to • • t 

Borrower, of Boone County Who | Louisville, Ky.- They played the | ' Mr. J3rown and the owner of the 
Have Secured Loans Through The ; KanK . f the big boy and the little : Louisville Post will consolidate and 
Boone County National Farm Associ- 1 boy at Frankfort this week in the t h „ ppbliration will be under the 
tion. 1 General Assembly; of the little boy I management of a cooperation with 



From an 
published 
three years 
lowing: R. S. Crislci 



ssue of the Record**"" 

in. 7th, 1S!H— thirt'-- 

go, we noticed the fol- 

made several 



HURLEY LEAF SALE 



departs. 

The big boy in th<. 
game was G o vernor W. 



~V< 



LegiStUre's j " cry Large -^uantily. Says Presi- 
.1. Fields and ! dent Stone, Of 1922 Crop In- 



the ittle boy whs the minority, that 
has an idea of perhaps causing trou- 
ble. The wrestle followed the re- 
ports of the Rules Committees in 
the Serrate and the Bangui 

it was brought about by a pro- 
posal to eut the period at tre close 



eluded In One of Largest 

Deals On Record In To 

bacco Held by the 

Pool. 



The Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co., 



j who goes up to the big boy and says, ; y\ r p rown as president. 

Checks, are being prepared by A. j "Let me see how strong you are," ___ __. 

B. Renaker, Sec-Treasurer of the [ then starts to wrestle with a lurking < • iprri'T n II VI lit' 
Boone County National Farm Loan j idea that perhaps he can throw t.Fi*^ : L.11 [lit I I U Ml lid 
Association of Burlington and will ; big boy. When She big boy has gent- i niinrilinrn iti nir 

be mailed to all borrowers of said ! ly, but effectively, planted him on j H If KliH A Si K 111 Kill 

Association within the next ten days the ground the little boy remarks, j 
for an X per cent dividend on stock • "you're a lot Stronger than .1 thought I 
held by borrowers by reason of their. you wen," brushy, o:F the dust am! j 
owning stock in. .said Assciation in 
connection with loans received from 
the Federal Land Bank. 

These dividends received by the 
borrowers will reduce the interest 
rale on their loans to approximately 
5 per ceo., for the past year. 

Mr. Rena'keT reports that quite a 
numbers of farmers are taking ad- 
vantage of this plan to receive loans 
•>t a low rate of interest ai'd that 
$153,800.00 in loans have been clos- 
ed to date and with $90,000.00 in 
applications for loans now pending 
will run the total loans made by the 
Association to an amount consider- 
ably over $200,000.00. 

This is considerable business done 
by the Association in so short a ttim 
and shows that the farmers of Boone 
county know a good thing when it is 
once understood as this is the only 
plan whereby a farmer can get cheap 
money in Boone county. 

Mr. Thomas Wiard of The Federal 

Land Bank of Louisville was in 

Boone county several days last week 

appraising a number of farms for 

; the Boone County National Associa 



of his firends a New Y '.. . c ^ of 
a nice, little iron wedge to be use t 
as a paper weight. The Recorder wasr. 
remembered by Colonel." And tha- 
same little iron wedge is still on our- 
fable. 

Thirty-three years ago John Keys, 

end Bert Rusk were confined in this- 

. Burlington jail for the murder of* 

Billy Fee, near Lawrenceburg Ferry.. 

NOT IN SYMPATHY WITH IT 

Asserting that he is not in sym- 
pathy with the endorsement by the 
State Road Association of the pro- 
posed $75,000,000 bond issue in \t% 
present form, A-ttomey Harvey 
MyeJCS, of Covington, President of 
the .Northern KentuCKy" Good Roads 
Association, has forwarded frottt 
I Clearwater. Fla., his resignation :© 
; Vice-President and a member of tho 
' Executive Committee of the Stats* 
■ organization. 



purified b e fo re b e ing d estroyed that 
is stated in our Bibles, in "Revela 
tions." 

K1RTLEY L. RICE, 

Burlington, Ky. 



tion, the application having been I jority of those present, not to fall 
sent in the first of the year, which j below two fifths of the elected mem 
shows that the Federal Land Bank is j '>ership. This failed also, 
trying to give all applications for ' 
loans promtp service thru the loeal 
Association of this county. 

The banks of this county should 
cioperate with the Boone County Na- 
tional Farm Loan Association in hav- 
ing their mortgage borrowers place 
their loans through the Association, 
thereby enabling their customer to 
receive cheap money, much lesi 
than a bank can accommodate them, 
and at the same time release frozen 
mortgage loans from the banks hands 
and permit the bank to place the 
funds realized on these frozen loans 
into a more liquid form of invest- 
ment at a rate equal to, and in many 
[instances greater — than — the — rata 



The people who feel a keen inter- 
est in securing progress and ad- 
vance in thjfir home town, aften in 
quire what motives shall be appeal- 
ed to, to make people take a keen- 
er interest in the development of 
their home community. 

At the risk of being considered 
too eager for material progress, per- 
haps Money Making could be urged 
as a otive No. 1. It need not be a 
sordid motive. Money is power to do 
all good and helpful things. 

When a man buys property, he ac- 
quires a stake in that place. If ;t 
grows, his property becomes more 
valuable. Even if be does not own 
the property he occupies as a tenant, 
his job grows more valuable as a 
result of the prosperity of the man 
he works for. The man who is get- 
ting ahead can do better for his 
employes than the unprosperoui 
man can. 

And now the telephones of tk« 
world are to be combined under oiu 
ownership — if plans of big financiers 
materialise. This will be another o;> 
I'ort.mity to unload NeV*r«l billion* 
ul watered stock on the u>ar peo- 
ple. 



which the borrower is paying to the 
local bank. If this plan was adopt- 
ed by the banks of Boone county it 
would not be necessary to have bills 
payable on their books as their li- 
quid investments could be realized 
on at any time their local demand re- 
quired it and in so doing all the 
.banks would be rendering, and in po- 
sition to render a greater service to 
their customers as in this way th? 
banks would never be short of loan- 
able funds for their customers on 
temporary accommodations. 

Congress has provided this pla.i 
for the benefit of the farmers and 
no one else and they should look into 
it and place their mortgoge loans 
with the Federal Land Bank. 

FEW DEPOSITS 

Of the 98 postofflces in Kentucky 
authorized to receive postal saving! 
deposits, practicully half of them 
have no such deposits. The report 
of the postmaster general on the 
operations of the postal savings sys 
tem shows there are l,;l">7 depositor* 
with deposits of *:t it;,!*"'.) in Ken 
tucky. Of the total number of .It 
pusitors more than two-thirds are In 
l/ounville utu " their deposits m 



the session wren the Rales Cum- j il became known today, was the pal 

eraser of the approximately sixty 
million pounds of tobacco sold last 
week bp the L'urley Tobacco Grow- 
ers' Co-operative Association. Presi- 
dent and General Manager James C. 
Stone of the Burley co-operative, 
made the announcement today in tl^- 
following statement: 

• 'Tlrs was one of the largest single 
sales of leaf tobacco to a signle man- 
ufacturer ever made, when the Lig- 
gestt & Myers Tobacco Compary 
purchased sixty million pounds of 
the tobacco held bythe Burley To- 
baec Growers' Co-operative As< >c- 
li-i'on. Included in this parchose 
v.ts . very large q anrity of rW 
Burley tobacco of the li»22 vroo, 
which is the best Burley ever grown 
in Kentucky, possessing an uuusu-il 
quality and flavor." 

According to announcement made 
by the Liggett & Myers Company, 
this high-grade leaf will be used in 
the manufacture of its widely-known 
brends, especially its Velvet smokin; 
tobacco, insuring a sueprior quality. 



j mittees take crarge of all tegisbl 

tio!!, from fifteen days to ten, Ad- : 
| vocates of the tea-day period raised j 
j a loud lament about "gag rule" and , 
protested against too much power be- ! 
in,, given to the Rules Cdmmittyu»s. j 
W hen the vote came, Governor 1 
Fields and the administration forces 
scored a victory so decisive that tho 
skirmish could be termed "no con- 
test." The Senate adopted the rules 
rerommended v. ith the fifteen-day 
period by a vote of 23 to 12; while 
the house approved its committee re- 
port by a vote of 6b to 33, thus giv- 
ing a two to one result. 

A secondary onslaught undertook 
to make it ossible to take a bill from 
a committee with a vote of the ma 



Rides adopted enable tho consti- 
tutional majority of the elected mem 
bership to take a bill from the com- 
mittee and put it on passage. It will 
take 51 of the 100 members in thi 
House to call up a bill and 20 of th j 
38 in the Senate. 

The tilt over the rules between the 
administration forces and those that 
might be made into an opposition 
shows the strength of the adminis- 
tration and indicates "that Governor 
Fields will be alle to carry through 
his program for the state. 



Louisville newspapers owned by 
Judge Robert \>. iimgham, the Cour- 
ier-Journul and the Times, have be- 
gun criticism of state administration 
on a number of points, the principal 
on e o f which grow s out of the ap- 
pointment of James B. Brown, of 
Louisville, President of the .National 
Bann of Kentucky, to be a member 
of the State Tax Commission. 

The situation between Mr. Brow a 
and the Bingham papers added to t!.e 
interest that was caused Frid.iy 



A YEAR OF DEATHS 

It may seem at first analysis of 
til-- deaths of prominent men and! 
women in the world during 192.1 r 
that the demand was unusually higTr 
or the toil made by i>ie Grim Reap- 
er. But if you will take the trou- 
ble to ran back over any preceding, 
year, you will find that each twelver 
months will strike you in about the-, 
same way. 

HAND 'EM IN 
As tht- mechanical workings of 
the Recorder prevents us getting out 
rnd mixing with the people; ami 
therefore many items escape us~. 
V.'.un yo : have an item of news-,., 
v.\.r.'t you hand them in or call us; 
up over the phone? 



MRS. CYNTHIA MASON, DEAD 



Mrs. Cynthia Mason, widow oi 
James H. Mason, died suddenly a 
the home of her niece, Mrs. Cynthii 
White, in Walton, Tuesday, Jan. 1 .". , 
1924, aged 88 ye aT97-9- months and 
21 days, from pneumonia; she was 
a good christian woman, was born 
in Big Bone neighborhood, wheiv 
she lived the greater portion of h« •..• 
l i f e . H e r hubband preceded her t > 



JUST THE TRICK 

Some claim that when the electric- 
lights are put up between Burling- 
ton and Florence the work of put- 
; ting down the concrete road between 
these two towns will be an easy jot*. 
— the contractor can ork a day andL 
night shift. 

BOONE'S INHERITANCE TAX 

The report of the Tax Conimis- 
' sion at Frankfort show that for the* 
J month of December, 1923, inher:- 
; tance tax payments were $36,187.44_ 
I Of this amount there was one fronn 
! Boone county amounting to $154.20, 



TO MEET JUNE 24. 
The Democratic National Conveo- 
i tion will be held at New York City 



the grave many years ago. She i.- 
stirvived by a sister, Mrs. Geo. L. 
Smith, of Big Bone, and two niece-, 
Mrs. Jan.es Ajlor of Big Eone, an.: 
Mrs. Cynt hia Whi te, of Walton. 

Funeral services were held ut P» ; . 
Bone Baptist church of which she 
was a member, Thursday, January 
17, conducted by the pastor, Rev. 
Miller, after which the remains were 
laid to rest in the cemetery at tint 
morning by the announcement tha» ! P lace ; c - Scott Chambers undertak- 
Mr. Brown had bought the Louisville | er - Wa,ton » had charge of the fun- 
Herald from John C. Shaffer, 01 j e,al ■n-angements. 

Chicago, who has owned the paper »■ 

for 14 years. |» ' COMING TO COVINGTON 

Aside from his political influence, 

Mr. Brown is the leading financier of There will be u W. M. U. Inst i 
the state. He is President of the tute of Central District in Madison 
National Bank of Kentucky, the lar- Ave., Baptist church, Feb. 1st to 4th. 
gest bank in the South, and is Uirec- •*«■> Blanche White, field worker of 
tor in the Standard Oil of Kent', v \y, Southern Baptist convention and Mis; 
the Louisville Gas and Electric Coin- Jennie Bright, State Young People's 
pany and the Kentucky Jockey Club, leader, will make addresses each af- 
besides having other large interest 1 -, ternoon at 2 and 7:30. Other inter 
He is one ot the closest friends of esting features will be a Story tell 



I b e ginning June 24, following the Raw 
publican convention at Cleveland^ 
Ohio, June 10th. 



LAST SALE 



The la.*t registered Poland Ohm** 
sale of J. F. Cleek wiB be held Thurs- 
day, Jan. 31, at the farm on ti*s 
Dixie Highway, near Walton. 



William G, McAdoo and one ot the 

leaders of the movement to ;io..im- 

•te Mr. McAdoo for President. 

the ii'ieert'f Mr. Brown has b»en 
one of remaikiiUle success, >\ n by 



ing hour and conference for worker* 
SOME MAZUMA 

According to the annual report ot 



bis own efforts, H< is past .so years the Commissioner of pensions, w 

old and >ame to LouisvHNi from Old uigtun, 1>. C, during the fiscal yeui 



hum County ut 17 tu euro Ins living ending June 30, IU*'.';, nn itggiegn»< 



• more than two thirds ..I the total d< 

. « . | --••■■■-'••*•.-— • . . » ». ■ ■■< 'i in i 1 1 . m* * nMuiH «*imv %*v % i .•*,•! , fill <I|C|C E 

'TuU.' . """'' 1,u ' "*""•'"' s,, "« u bookkeepvt to: > news coriipaav. ot $«;,!»72,«47.20 was paid in 

M ill depoH.tors In Louisville wi'l. • In 18!»7 be «*■ uppo.ited as*:stin: sums u. 14,160 pensioner* in 
I depose of $216,G7I. , uv M . ii , iV( „ d ^ Ktntuckl 



NOTICE 

i All members of Burlington Lodge- 
| K. of P. No. 109, will please be pre*- 
j ent next Saturday evening at T k. 
j m. Business of importance. 

We are beginnicg to wonder 
whether 1924 can bear up under tho 
; b.ureLv of Stafs t ici that rave beep. 
ui. .ad- <! on »t ihis \»t . 

Tr. T. B. Castlenwn, who is spen<*- 
, ing the winter in Florida, expects te> 
! he back at his office In Florence about. 
March 1st. 

Whooping cough among the chiT- 

i dren has vl ,t the attendance at 

Roone County High School cucattsj- 

erubh 

Several of tlu> rcsitlsnce* of Bur- 
lington have been *in*(r ready ft*- 
the electric lights. 

The cokl weather has quieted the* 
ioi mi oi the carpenter* haawtea 

J l) V 



^7 



— 



^^m 



wmmm 



mm 



T 



PAGE 



BOONE COUN TT RECORDER 



AW,WHArSTHEUSE 



"i 



By L. K.V.-n Zelm 

a> Wmiem NfWijviprf Union 



in Tke c-' place ^ou have no 
business looking im heg f?oom & 

IN The a"-? PLACE You'd BETTEQ 

pick up youg own 



Atta Boy, Felix! 



"THIS 1$ MX ROOM AN' 
I'M GONNA .DO AS r 
PLEASE IM IT P 



V'MI ttv*^» 




MONDAY IN FRANKFORT 



Assemblymen introduced 156 bills 
providing for 25 "cents on $100 real- 
ty tax two and one-half and thnc 
per cent coal tax; numerous road 
projects; approoriation bills for tho 
Geological Survey; for the School oi 
the Blind, for the State Fair Poultry 
'Building; increasing tax on oil from 
one to two cents; and many miscel- 
laneous bills. 

Committees met to consider bills 
returned from the printer. 

Senate unanimously, and House 
to (5, decided a joint session Tuesday 
January 12'.', at 1 :30 o'clock to he : 
opponents of the $75,000,000 An- 
ministration bond issue recommenda- 
tion. * 

Senate confirmed appointment Ii> 
Governor \V. .1. Fields of R. T. Kcn- 
nard, Olive Hill, as a member of the 
Workmen's Compensation Board to 
succeed Clyde R. Levi, Ashland. 

House passed concurrent resolu- 
tions, introduced by Frank I. 
Strange, floor leader, for a joint ses- 
sion Wedneslay morning to elect 
Mrs. J. Campbell Cantrill to 
ceed Mrs. Grace Garrett Hend 
State Librarian. 

Applications for seats at the W 
Jiam Jennings Bryan dinner Wedne 
day evening arrive. 

Efficiency Commission recommend 
ed alternate plan for pay-as-you-;y > 
system for raising road bond issue. 
President McVey, of the State Uh 
iversity, summoned before the BwP 
get Commission. 

The Legislation Committee of th 
State Board of Education started its 
program. 



Lick Creek. 



BEAVER LICK. 



John S. Kyle took his tobacco tS Six below zero Monday. 
Walton, last Wednesday. V Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Griffith spent 

Walter Ryle is sporting . a ne\v\pst Friday in the city. 
Ford roadster. ' ) Robt. Rouse, of Burlington, was 

There is an epidemic of whoopii.g i* 1 this neighborhood renewing ' fire 
cough and chicken-pox in this neiijh- insurance policies last week. | 

borhood. | Charles Johnson entertained th.- \ 

('. L. Stephens has purchasedVi Walton High School graduating class I 
new Molette cream separator. \ °f "i»e last Friday night with a Ro <k ' 

Cecil Williamson is doing a lot of\p ar ty and lunch, 
blacksmithing and making sleds nil J M r - and Mrs. Joe W. Cleek and I 
Recount of the slick weather. Miss Anna write that they are enjoy- | 

Helen Gore is confined to he: m 8 their trip to Jacksonville, Fla., ' 
hoftte with heart trouble. and the warm sunshine. 

- Howard Acra, teacher of Maple Mr. Omer Atha delivered 2800 lb< 
" " - 1 - ' -^d not teach last Mon- 
day on account of getting stuck on 
the way. 

There are not many attending- the 
Maple Hill school on account of bal 
weather and mumps. 




HOPEFUL 

Miss Nellie Robbins was shopping 
in the city Tuesday. 

S. J. Robbins is the first in the 
neighborhood having spring lambs. 

Misses Rosa Barlow and Ora Ro' - 
were shopping in the city Fri- 



EGG LAYING CONTEST 

The winter Egg Laying Contest h 
booming ahead in spite of the cold 
night* that have been tickling the 
biddies combs. 

During the month of JOecrmber E. 
G. Stephenson's flock 344 White ^v- 
sorns k'id 2468 eggs or an average\( 
7.2 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. B. E. Aylor's flack of 300 
White Leghorns finished in second 
place, laying 1878 eggs, or an aver- 
age of 6.3 eggs per hen. 

Roy C. Lutes flock finished in 3rd 
place. His flock of 187 White Leg- 
horns laid 988 eggs or an average 
of 5.3 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. A. G McMullen with a mixed 
flack of 184 Barred Rocks and White 
Leghorns got 580 eggs or an average 
of 31 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. O. C. Hafer got 120 eggs 
from her flock of 55 Buc Rocks mak- 
ing an average of 2.1 eggs per hen. 

Considering the cold and change- 
able weather these are very good av- 
erages. 

SEEING GHOSTS 

Along about 12 o'clock last Frida • 
night some of the citizens in the 
east end of town, were awakencrj 
from their slumbers by the rattling 
of chains across their porches. W. 
C. Weaver, who is not use to such 
noises after night, got up and look- 
ing out the window saw what he 
said appeared to be a large ape or 
gorilla looking t h rough t h e win d ow 
at him. A search failed to disclos> 
*ny animal, wild or otherwise. Sev- 
eral other people in that end of town 
were awakened f;ora their sleep bv 
the same noise. Much excitement 
and considerable alarm was caused 
by the intruder, which next morn- 
ing proved to be a large black hound 
with * chain attached to it, and wa.i 
Jound fastened in a neighbor's yard 
fence. You can't fool Clint all the 
time. 



ommie East"" fndjui^e snent J»u 
Sunday with her mother, Mrs. Annie 

Mr::. Su.-w. Harlow visited M- \ ^IG B 

Jane Becmon and daughters one day\ Quite a sudden 
the past week. \ weather at this w: 

Miss Minnie Beemon spent th\ Miss RlJ th Cleel 
week-end with her sister, Mrs. Har-y 

NJnn, of Hebron. 

AMrs. Laura Snyder spent Monday 
wTth her mother Mrs. Owen AyloV 
of the Burlington pike. 

Miss Nellie Robbins visited Mr*. tve treated, 



of tobacco to the pool at Walton last ! 
Wednesday and received an advance j 
of $10.00 per hundred on it. 

Burglars robbed the Beaver Lie"* ■ 
Mercantile Co., store last Thursdrv ' 
night. They pred the front doors 
open and got an assortment of things 
shoes, over shoes, overalls, socks, 
stockings, table oilcloth, canton flan- 
nel, linoleum, coffee, beans, case of 
tomatoes, gallon bucket of black pep- 
per, case eggs, box cigars, some to- 
bacco and many other things, but did ! 
not take any money. One money j 
drawer had $8 in change in it and a I 
lot of postage stamps, registered let ! 
fees and money orders. 



Night 

coughing— 

exhausts you so that you arc 
more tired in the morning 
than when you went to bed. 
Dr. King's New Discovery 
stops coughing by gently 
stimulating the 
mucous mem- 
branes to throw 
off clogging se- 
cretions. It has i 



HEBRON THEATRE-- Next Saturday 



taste." All 
gists. 




"A Good Show' 

Admission 22 Cents, :-: Children 10 Cents 

*»•» lav Included 




3 

I 

a 

N 



<±'*MiJkA MJXjQ 



BIG BONE. 

change in the ' 
writing, 
k spent Saturday i 
night and Sunday with home folks. 
Virgini a Maud Miller is visiting: 
or grandmother, Mrs. H. E. Miller, j 
Mrs. W. R. Miller has return^ d i 
home from the city after having hvr 



RABBIT HASIf . 

Wedding bells will soon be ring- 
ing here. 

Mrs. Lute Aylor is very ill with 
mumps. 

Walter Ryle has a new Ford ton- 
ing car. 

Truck drivers are very busy haul- 
ing tobacco. 

Fillmore Ryle .-pent Sunday -it 
Hubert Clore's. 

Jennie Montgomery, of Seymour, 
lnd., is visiting at Dr. Carlyle 's. 

Robert Stephens visited his sist< 
Mrs. Lavine Stephens las-t week. 

Irene Scott and Paul Acra called 
on Helen Clore Sunday afternoon 



Public 




Having decided to quit dairying I will offer for sale ;it r 
dence on the East Bend and Waterloo Pike, near 
Waterloo, Boone Countj, Ky.. on 

Saturday, Feb. 2/24 




Wm. Utz of the Burlington pikev; 
couple of days the past week. 

3. M. Barlow, of Burlington, spert 
several days last week with his 
daughter, Mrs. W. P. Beemon. 

S. J. and Albert Robbins and KM 
Borders each delivered their crops of 



Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Miller ar. 
-pending a few days visiting relatives 
in Louisville. 

_ Anna Dudgeon and Mrs. Ra"v 
Sparks spent Friday with their sister, 
Mrs. Forest Black. 

Charier Jones has gone to Li 



The Following Property 
*!^%£^V££t.\ 9 °' 3 - JCar ° ld UUW - 3 "" ar 0,d Government Sulli.,, 



u ""•»*« """»»" meir crops oi ■ » ..■»■ ■» .. ---.«.== ,,«.-> j^une io l, 

tobacco to the Covington loose leaf ,ow to be under the care of Tr. 



market last week 

Lottie Mae and Rosa Belle Rou.se 

iave returned to their homes on the 

Union pike after spending several 

weeks with their cousin Viola Hor- 

ton. 



G. Slater for a few days 

Mrs. Geo. Bumside was the Sat- 
urday night and Sunday guest of he.- 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lute Abdoi . 
On account of Goebel Black's ma- 
chine catching on fire and burning 
— ■— — | the back of the front seat consider- 

W e clipped the following from able, he was forced to make calls on 
''Just Among „Home Folks" column horse back - 




GUNPOWDER 

Stanley Utz and wife of the Big, 
Bone neighborhood, passed thru our I 
burg on Friday of last week 

Mrs. J. W. Rouse is still 



in last Saturday's Curier-Journal: 

In Boone county one night when 
the dogs were running a fox ove\on 
Wolpers a feller told us a yarn abdVt 
being fair-minded. He said a pack* 
peddler sold a farmer a can of f!..« 

Powder. The peddler started aw-^v *?,£ \ £ R ° US * , ta stiU ver >' 
and the farmer stopped him How ' h« * ' COndlt \ on is such that 

her recovery is very doubtful. 

R. E. Tanner finished stripping 
his crop of tobacco last week and 
will deliver it to Walton in a few 
days. 

A cold wave struck our Ridge last 



Little Isnbelle Merrick is recover- 
ing from an attack of double pne i 
onia. 

Lewis Craig and family entertain- 
ed W. J. Stephens Saturday night 
^nd Sunday. 

Thaddie Ryle and family broke 
bread with Robert Hankinson uod 
family Sunday. 

Mrs. Ada Ryle and daughter W«- 
'tta visited her parents Harry Acra 
and wife, last Thursday. 

Very few scholars are attending 
Maple Hill school which is due to 
whooping cough and chicken-pox. 



'io you use the stuff, "he ast. Well 
said the peddler, you take the flen 
between your thumb and your mid- 
dle finger and you prize open his 
mouth and drop in the powder and 

the flea dies right away. But says th« : " ~-— -•*« »««« our m 
farmer, if I had holt of the flea be- ' Satur day night which made it rath 
tween my fingers I would crush him I er uncomfortable as the chan j 
to death without needing to put the i came ver y suddenly. 
t P h7 de !J, n hi8 v mouth - Well, admitted I Miss Ida Rouse, who was an ir- 
tne peddler that is a good way, too. ! mate of the Lakeland Asylum, died 
it reminded us of a story that a t that institution last week. The 
granopap use to tell about taking a remains were brought to Slorence 
liberal view of thines. Thev w», . where ap propriate funeral serviee* 



SPECIAL BUSINESS MEETING 

Clem Kendall, President of the 
Boone County Farm Bureau has call- 
ed a special business meeting of the 
Directors and the Fnance Committee 
for Monday, January 28th, at one 
o'clock. This meeting will be he'l 
in the Farm Bureau Building a r 
Florence. All members are urged 
to attend, as the business will be of 
interest to everyone. 



2 W-1HW-, 

old Jersey Heifers, f>-mos. old Jersey Bull. 3 2-year old Jersey 
Heifers to be fresh in April, 8 Jersey Cows to be fresh from now 
until last of April, 2 Jersey Cows fresh now, 2-year old Jersey 
Bull, 8 Shoats, Uuroc Roar, Brood Sow, Road Wap-on. Spri.g 
Wagon, share in Si n Cutter, 36 joints of Meat, IS Sides of 
Mea4, 30 gallons of Lard, and other articles 

TERMS OF SALE 

All sums of $10 00 and under, cash; over $10.00 a credit »~f 

nine months, note with approved security, payable at Peopfes 

Deposit Bank, Burlington. Ky. No property removed until 
terms are complied with. 

Ernest Brown. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock (noon; 



FOR SALE ETC 




FARM FOR RENT | 

Farm of 135 acres will rent on the I 
shares, 10 cows, tobacco and corn 
ground, nice new four room house ! 
to good tenant. Also for sale 75 
ewes. Apply to 

H. L. McCLASSON, 

olGjan— pd Hebron, Ky. 



HALE AND HEARTY AT 83. 

L. S. Beemon, who resides about a 
mile from Burlington, on the Bur- 

<j£° n ^ nd ^o^nce Pike, passed , 
eighty-third mile' post along the Jour- 
ney through life, last Thursday, Jan 
l.th, was in town that day looking 
hale and hearty, anji from his looks 
and actions promises to be here 
many more years. He walks from hw 
home to Burlington and back and 
••ems to enjoy the walk. He can read 
the newspapers without glasses. F,;- 
the last two or three months he h.»s 
bjen making his home with his 
niece, Mrs. J. B. Rouse. 



— ,. „ ar "ivj Yvoa a 

y° un £ ieller put on his Suna ly 
britches and went to see his gal. The 
gals folks had painted the front 
porch and the young feller histe i 
hisself onto the porch and there tie 
set with his i laigs hanging down and 
the seat of his britches freezing onto 
the paint. He set there till time to 
go home and the gal had to git her 
menfolks to sow her sweetheart loose 
from the porch. That evening when 
the young feller got home he sidled 
around the wall and started upstai s 
backwards. His mamma hollered at 
him and ast why he was going up 
stars thataway. "Just as good a way 
as any," said the young feller 



were conducted by Rev. Runyan i 
the M. E. church of which she waj 
a member, after which the remaini 
were buried in the Florence cemeter- 
by those of her mother who preceded 
her to the gave several years ago. 
She leaves a father, several broth- 
ers and sisters and a host of friends 
Io mourn her departure. 



A coat of fresh bright paint will 



"'*ke yourkifchen a pieasanter place 
to work. Try it. Use Foy's. Hop- 
Conner, Florence, Ky. 



W. B. Arnold and sister, Miss 
nora, of Belleview, and their guest., 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Huey, f Ply- 
mouth, 111., attended the poultry 
«»«aUi»» at the court house, Tuesday 
afUmoon. While in town they 
»«d« the Recorder office a pleasant 
call. 



There are three kinds of giver*, 
the flint, the sponge and the honey- 
comb. To get anything out of flint 
you must hammer it, and then you 
K*t only chips and sparks. To eet 
water out of a sponge you mu*t 
squeeze it,, and the more you squeeze 
the more you will get. But the honey 
comb juBt overflows with its own 

and hard, they give nothing away if 

hey can help it; others are gool na- 

tured and yield to pressure, giving 

thiT Ik ni?, "^ at ■". " nd o" 
these the Bible „ay B . The I^rd lov- 

-th a cheerful giver." T« which clasi 
do you belong?— Fx. 

About nine hundred auto owners 
have ...cured (he.r I H24 license tag.. 



PT. PLEASANT. 

Another one of Pt. Pleasant's old- 
est citizens passed away January 17 
1924. Mr. Carl Zimmer was born in 
West Baden, Germany, 78 years ajo 
and has resided here more than 60 
years. His wife preceded him to the 
grave six years ago eaving him very 
sad and lonely. He was laid to rest 
by her side in Constanmmmmuuukg 
by her side in Constance cemtery 
last Saturday afternoon. He leaves 
to mourn him three daughters, a son 
and several grandchildren and a ho*t 
of old friends and neighbors. 

Mr. Brice Mayhew died Jan. 14th, 
1924 aged 61 years at his home near 
Sayler Park on Lower River Road, 
after a lingering illness due io 
Bright'* disease. He was tender!-/ 
cared for by his faithful wife and 
his favorite cousin Mrs. Maria Dar- 
by, who went to his bedside and ad- 
ministered unto him until the sum 
mons came. Mr. Mayhew will be 
»*dly missed by all who knew him i 
he was very kind and pleasant to ev 
•■ryone. 



For Sale— Three Mammoth Bronze 
Turkeys, 1 yearling and two youn^ 
gobblers $10.00 each. They are tho 
monarch of poultrydom. Finest breed 
Mrs. J. W. Carpenter, Union, Ky. 
o31jan— 2t 



Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. I.) Put Up 
with Rate for Year. 

. .' V ** r * "S° I Sot some rat poison, which newly 
kiUtti our fine watch dog. We put up with "tat; 
until a friend told me about Rat-Snap, It aurel,- 
•ulb rats, though houMpeti won't touch h." Kau 
dry up and leave no imell. Price*. 35c. 65c. 11.25. 

Sold and guaranteed by 
Ciullev A P ettlt, P. R. Wlythi. 



Mia. Crandall (Iowa) Tell. How Shu 
Stopped Chicken Losses 

"l*« spring, rats killed all our baby chicaa. WWt 
I'd known about Kit-Soap before. With just one 
Ucge package we killed swarms of rats. They won't 
get this years hatches, I'll bet'' RaC-Snepia guar- 
anteed and sells for J5c. 65c. 11.25. « 
Sold and guaranteed by 

Gulley A Pettit, Burlington. Ky. 
.!>• R- Blythe Burlington, Hy." 



WANTED— Crop tenant, prefer . 
man with some help of his own. A) 
Ply to C. O. Hempfling, Taylorspon, 
Ky- o24jan — 2t 




«•%/•• 



We try to satisfy you with sleds. 
We like to make you want more of 
o.'r line as you grow older. Mad^ 
ly CONNER & KRAUS, Florence, 
Ky. Agents: Walton Lumber Co., 
Walton, Ky., and Aubrey Finn, Bur- 
lington, Ky., Route 1. 

For Sale — Fresh cow. T. B. test.'<i 
Yancy Clore, Telephone 1 89. 



For Sale — Laundry Queen Electric 
washer 32 volt, almost new. Lopper 
tub, aluminum wringer $150. Ma- 
chine for $76.00. H. R. Leidy, Flor 
ence, Ky. 



Found— Yellow Collie dog with 
ring around neck. Raymond Beemon, 
Florence, Ky. it 



For Sale — Estey Organ in good 
condition. Mrs. Lewis L. Stephens, 
Burlington, Ky. It— pd 



WANTED 

Man to raise three or four acrv* 
of tobacco and work by the day. 
House, garden and cow pasture fur- 
n'hod. 

C L Cropper, Idlewild, Ky 
24Jan— tf 



Fur Suits — Three fresh cows with 
calvrs by their side. J. B. Rous, 
huriinglon, Ky. Star Route 



WANTED — Man to raise three or 
four acres of tobacco. C. L. Cropper 
Idlewild, Ky. 17Jan— tf 

WANTED— Good tenant or hired 
man to raise crop on shares, married 
man prefered, house and garden 
furnished. Apply to L. A. Scott, De- 
von, Ky. Phone Independence 1703. 
olfeb — 4t pd 

For Sale — Barred Rock Cocereis. 
Fine barring. Bred to lay. Mrs. B C 
Graddy, Burlington, Ky., R. D. l! 
Consolidated phone No. 255. 
o24jan— pd 

NOTICE— See MTlTRIfier^bbU 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford oars 
and Ford Tractors. 



RUCKING 



OF ALL KINDS DONE BY 

Wafter R. Huey 

IF "RENCE, KY. 

Prices Re.,o. V. Giv* Me a Trial. 

IT5..I* 4I6-X 



NOT.-S. 
All persons ind*. . 4 to Thomas 
Corcoran, deceased, w 1 please some 
forward and pay same. All persoi.a 
having claims against said estate win 
present same proven as the few iv- 
quires. 

MICHAEL CORCORAN, 
Kaecutor 



Hall's Catarrh 
Medicine 3* fc *V! 

rid your iTK«m of Catarrh or DeafncM 
caused by Catarrh. 

UH »y dSTsggaw /fcr mm 49 ymw$ 
F. J. CHENEY Cl CO., Toledo, Ohio 



WANTED— To rent farm- \ 
rent on the share or money rent 
prefer money rent, would like farm 
located near school and on good 
road, one that will do for dairy farir. 
and some good tobacco and com 
land. 7 or 8 acres of tobacco and 20 
acres for corn. 

CHESTER HILL, 

Idlewild, Ky. 
o30jan4t— pd 

California has H million nuton* 
bile* J. "'hat' enough to rum ( , n > 



. * 



■aaaaa. 




-L 



^™ 



Afl oUtavi« a> card of tkamlu -.4 
•Jl ©tk«r HI ttol s J|ot newt, m«tt b« 
►•M for «t 8 c£9lf>p«r Um. 



BuilittslMiro Baptist Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Paator. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 
1000 a. m. 

Regular preaching service* on the 
ffbat and Third Sundays la 
awath at 11:00 a* m. 



BIRTHDAY OF BENJAMIN FRANK 

LIN TO BE CELEBRATED 

BY FREEMASONS 



BOONE COUNTY R ■ 0^ 



WINNING BtfeinESS CONFI 
DENCE. 

When a person starts o,ut to buy 
some household or personal article, 



v ... ■"».••» iiuuocuuiu ur personal article 

Freemasons of the world celebrat- he does not in the majority of cases 



Mtthodist Episcopal Church. 

~SV. P. G. GILLESPIE Pastor 

Florence and Burlington Chart* 

FLORENCE 

Fira^and Third Sundays 11 a. m. 

Srandly School 9:30 a. m. 
(Miss Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 

Bpworth League every Sunday at 
6 p. m. 
(Miss Mamie Robinson, President 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:80. 
BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 10 
a. n. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 

Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 



Petersburg Baptist Church. 

REV. O. J. CHASTAIN, Pastor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 
a. m. -, 

Preaching on Second and. Fourth 
Sunday 11 a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 

Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. GEO. A. ROYER, Pastor. 
Sunday January 27th. 

w — .'• * ~~ -v, Sunday School. 
ntvoful 7 p. m., Luther League. 
Hebron 1:30 p. m., Sunday School. 
Hebron 2:30 p. m., Regular service. 
Hebron 3:30 Teacher Training. 



Burlington Baptist Churoh 

REV. W. W ADAMS, Pastor. 

Business Meeting Saturday 2 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Saturday 7 p. m. 
C L. Gaines Leader. 
Bible School 10 a. m. 
No preaching morning or evening. 
Young People's Work 6 p. m. 

Very little coming and going the 
past few days — too cold. 

F. H. Rouse and wife have been 
quite sick for several days. 

Mrs. L. T. Utz has been quite sick 
for several days with tonsilitis. 

Mra. Ellen Crigler, of Florence, is 
the guest of her daughter, Mrs. W. 
C. Weaver. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Garner, of 
Union, spent Saturday with Mr. and 
Mrs. L. T. Utx. 

On account of the very cold weath- 
er very there is very little stirring in 
the way of news. 

The mercury in the thermometer 
Monday morning registered 4 below 
zero in Burlington. 

Mrs. J. M. Thompson, of Aurora, 
Ind., is the guest of her daughter, 
Mrs. R. E. Berkshire. 

Town Marshall W. F. Grant, of 
Florence, was transacting business 
i« Burlington, Monday. 

Geo. H. Gordon and C. W. RUey, 
of Hebron, were business visitors to' 
Burlington, last Saturday. 

Out of about fifteen hundred dogs 
assessed in the county only about 
five hundred have secured license. 
Miss Myrtle Beemon, of Gunpow- 
der, has been the guest of her sister. 
Mrs. I* C. Weaver, for several days. 

Lyman Rice, manager for the T. 
W. Spinks Co., Erlanger, was trans- 
acting business in Burlington, Mon- 
day. « 

Postmaster Hickman has been con- 
fined to his home for several days. 
His wife and son have been running 
the postomce. 

Zelma Clore and daughter, Hazel 
Mane, and Martha Kelly, were the 
peasant guests of J. W. Kelly and 
wife, Sunday afternoon. 

What has become of the old tune 
men and boys in years gone by that 
use to go to the woodB this time of 
year and cut wood to keep warm? 

W. T. Carpenter, from out on R 



ed the birthday of Benjamin Frank- 
lin that occurred on January 17tn, 
which was the 218th anniversary of 
his birth. Franklin looms large among 
the distinguished Masons who took 
a conspicuous part in the American 
Revolution. 

Benjamin Franklin became a mem- 
ber of St. Johns Masonic Lodge, 
Philadelphia, in the year 1730. In 
1784 he was elected Grand Master 
of Masons of Pennsyvania; from 
1735 to 1738 served as Secretary of 
St. Johns Lodege; in 1749 was Pro- 
vincial Grand Master; in 1776 af- 
filiated with Masonic Lodges In 
France; in 1777 was elected a mem- 
ber of Lodge des IX Soeurs (Nine 
Sisters or Muses) of Paris. He as- 
sisted at the initiation of Voltaire 
in the lodgd of .the Nine Sisters in 
1778; in 1782 was elected Venerable 
Master of Loge des IX Soeurs; in 
1782 became a member of Lodge De 
Saint Jean de Jerusalem, of which 
lodge he later was eected Venerable 
d'Honneur. 

He was on the committee which 
drafted the Declaration of Independ- 
ence and was one of the signers. 

Franklin was appointed Postmas- 
ter General for the Colonies in 17C3 
and in the following year he was 
commissioner from Pennsylvania at 
the Inter-colonial Congress at Al- 
bany which met to consider the im- 
pending French and Indian War. Ho 
was of much assistance to General 
Braddock during the war. When the 
descendants of Wiliam Penn refus- 
ed to allow their private lands to be 
taxed for the support of the Englis i 
troop*, he was sent to England to 
etition the Crown, against this. His 
influence helped secure the repeal of 
the Sto.^ Act in 1766 

rim lamous kite experiment was 
•ii^de in 1762. His scientific views 
won acceptance by both England and 
Fra nce an d the degree of LL.D. was 
given him by uxford, Edinburgh and 
Saint Andrews, as a recognition of 
his pre-eminence in scientific inves 
tigation. 



know much about the thing he 's 
buying. Even if it is anything as sim- 
ple as a pair of shoes, he can not al- 
ways tell by the looks of the thing, 
as to whether it will give good ser- 
vice or not. There are so many ways 
py which inferior material can bo 
covered up and camouflaged, that a 
great deal of poor stuff looks very 
well. 

This the purchaser commonly rec- 
ognizes and views the stuff handed 
out to him with a certain degree of 
skepticism, unless indeed it is offer- 
ed at auch high prices that he feel* 
it must be good. Even then the priv> 
may be too high for the actual valu<\ 
When a person holding that atti- 
tude discovers that the article offer 
ed to him is from some make that 
has been wisely advertised, hw 
point of view changes. The advertis- 
ing gives him confidence. The stuff 
must be put out by a successful con- 
cern, he thinks, or they would n »t 
advertise as they do. And it must 
have given satisfaction to a multi- 
tude of people or people would noc 
dare to send money in pushing it. 

If this truth applies specially to ' 
lines of stuff that one sees advertis- ' 
ed in magazines and newspapers all 
over the country, it fits equally well 
in the matter of retail trade. Peop' ■» 
have to purchase a great deal of 
stuff of which they do not feel them- 
selves to be competent judges. They 
feel that they must depend upon fie 
integrity of the stores to give them 
good value, and must trust to their 
enterprise and efficiency to get mod- 
erately low prices. 

The fact that a store advertises 
freely tends to give them confidence 
m it. They feel that such a store 
_ -%e doing a good harness, it 
must be pleasing the public, its gooda 
must give satisfaction, or its owners 
would never push their goods as 
they do. 




HOOVER FAVORS RAILROAD 
CONTROL. 



He founded the Philadelphia Pub-j; "> i LaF( ? Ile " e and his polit- | 

ic Library, the first Amerkan pub- /rL^? 1 i" C ° n / resS ' are de " 
lie library, in 1731. Under the pseu t te ™ ,nod ^ mukn good their promise I 



onym of Richard Sanuders ho be 
gan the publication of Poor Rich- 
ard's Alamnac and for twenty-fiv 
years his witty sayings helped to 
n>old the character of the people of 
that time. 

Franklin's early life was a w0>» 
of adventures such as could only be 
exve-ienced in the unsettled period 
of pre-revolutionary times. His par- 
ents intended him for the ministry 
but lis deistic sentiments caused 
him tc turn from the churches and 
enter business. He secured control of 
a paper called the Pennsylvania Ga- 
zette, winning commendation thru- 
out the colonies for his printing and 
the spirit of his writings. 

He died April 17, 1790, and was 
buried in the graveyard of old Christ 
Church in Philadelphia. 



The ♦75,000,000 bond issue, advo- 
cated by Governor Felds, is attract- 
ing the attention of the voters nf mm 

Commonwealth. Th subject ahonk I i >PP°sit>on. It seems to 

receive the thoughtful 1121222 £?. ^- ™ y p,an that ™" P™duce 



«3> — •«-*» J'l Villi-* 

to the people to change the railroad 
rate law. Mr. LaFoIlette has intro- 
duced a bill that proposes to fix th<- ' 
rates on "the basis of cost of ser 
vice." This would mean the actual 
operating mst n) UB interest and a 
fair dividend for stock that repre- 
sents actual money invested. 

Following the introduction of this 
bill Secretary Hoover, in an address 
before the transportation conference 
at Washington, advocated "optional 
federal incorporation" for consolida- 
tion purposes. His proposition would 
take the roads out of state control 
entirely and put them under Fed- 
eral organization committees with 
public representatives. 

This was the plan advocated by 
Senators Newlands and LaFoylette 
just before we entered the world' 
war and just before Senator New- 
jand s sudden detftf, „ n d at that time 
the railroads who insisted on being 
taken over by the government, offer 
ed but little opposition. It seems to 



Considering that, as spring ap- 
proaches, retail buying will become 
more active, there will be a greater 
demand for Ford Cars this spring 
than ever before. 

Therefore, the only way you can 
be sure of obtaining delivery this 
coming spring or summer is 
to place your order immediately. 

If you do not wish to pay cash for 

w ' - - --—.,ij 

• l "» — "* °" 

the balance. Or you can buy on 

the Ford Weekly Purchase Plan. 

See the Nearest Authorized 
Ford Dealer 



*~""" X ^ ^V^ Detroit, Michigan & 





"* nOTICE 
All persons having claims agains 
the estate of Eugenia Blythe,...de 
ceased, will present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. All person? 
owing said estate will settle same 
at once. 

A. B. RENAKER, 

Executor 



LEARN TO PICK A 



200 EGG HEN 



receive the thoughtful consideration 
of every one before he should eith 
er condemn or advocate the bond is 



the desired results in our transpoi 
tation problem, but because the Fed- 

ed by the railroad speculators on 



the ground that it savors of Federal 
control. 



debtedness of the state and to im 
prove the State University and other 
public institutions. The different bond 
issues should be submitted in suHi 
a way that one would not depend on I 

the other for its passage. You mav i * ™ E F °* OP ™ISM 

be m favor of issuing bonds fir cer- ! rU AmonR the People who feel close'y 
tain purposes and against issuintr! currents ° f popular sentiment, 

bonds for another purpose. I * re tne Polishers of books. They 

The Covington Good Roads As- h ",? th ?. t the kind of thm S that wiil 
h«« anna „„ «_ — j t one period, will fall flat, 



and while in town called in to see 
the printers. 

Last Saturday people were stand- 
ing around on the streets enjoying 
the sunshine, and Sunday morning 
they were standing around a red-hot 
stov> freeding to death. 

W. R. Rogers and sisters, Misses 
Sallia.and Elizabeth have had a ra- 
dio installed in their residence, and 
are now receiving messages from all 
ports of the United States. 

Fred Heil, one of the Recorder's 
good friends from Point Pleasart 
neighborhood, was transacting busi- 
ness m Burlington, Monday. He 
colled at this office and had his sub- 
scription loosted another year. 

Peter Hager and Mrs. Clarence 
[*a«r, of Rabbit Hash precinct, were 
busmess visitors to Burlington, last 
Thursday. While in town Mr. Hag,-, 
called on the Recorder and had 
Mrs. Isabelle McMurray's named r- I- 
ded to our list of readers, for which 
they have our thanks. 



sociation has gone on record against I , 
the increase of two cents on each ' another - 
gallon of gasoline for road purposes 
We are not surprised at their action, 
although we believe that no method 
of raising revenue for road purpos- 
es has been advanced that is as just 
and fair as a gasoline tax. If yoa 
do not use the roads, you use no 
gasoline and you pay none of this 
tax, if you do operate your machine, 
then it takes gasoline to propel it 
and you pa y your toll for the use of 
^-inghway, and that toll- is just h? 



the proportion to the amount you 

operate .your automobile. With a 

tax of three cents on a gallon of gas 

oline the average touring car would 

D. two, was 'tranaaetinTbuiimeM m ne/S* *!%* on f^» ird of ■ <*nt 

Burlington, last Thursday morning LL 1, ^? Undw the old to11 

and while in town called nTErX I*u 70U pai . d . two <*»*> P** mile for 



The desire for certain 
types of thought passes over the 
country like a wave. 

The demand for sex novels and 
Plays has been one such wave. Auth- 
ors of a certain type have been pour- 
ing out these stories and drama- 
IJ'it sonu people woh are closely in 
-ouch with the public taste say that 
M passing. 

There was a big call about a year 
JJ* for n ^ ork f on practical psycha- 



Lexington, Ky. — If you can't tell 
a slacker hen from a high-produc- 
ing hen then attend the demonstra- 
tion on judging for egg production 
to be given by O. B. Kent, originator 
of the present system of culling 
flocks, at the Farm and Home Con- 
vention, Kentucky College of Agri- 
culture, January 29 to Feb. f. 

Numerous high and low producing 
hens will be one feature of the ex- 
hibits and opportunity will be given 
those who attend to select the hens 
whose egg laying records exceed 200 
eggs per year. Culling hens far, ac- 
cording to J. Holmes Martin of the 
Poultry Department, has been one of 
the pmcple means of increasing pro- 
duction in farm flocks, but with bet- 
ter knowledge of poultry it becomes 
necessary for poultrymen to select 
breeding stock from their flocks. It 
has been his purpose in bringing Mr. j 
O. B. Kent to the convention to 
show just how this selection may be 
accomplished and how poultrymen ' 
throughout the state may. make se- 
lections for their breeding pens this 
spring by noting the special charac- i 
teristics of a high-producing bird 
without having tranpnest records. 

STATE PARENT-TEACHERS 

MEET AT UNIVERSITY 



. "•"» f c « nine ior 

a horse and buggy and four cent* 
per mile for a two-horse wagon. 
Three cents a gallon tax on gaso 
line is not excessive and we find a 
number who advocate a five-cent tax 
on each gallon of gasoline. 

LESSONS FROM THE FARM 

A milking contest was held the 
other day between Senator Magnus 
Johnson and Secretary of Agricul- 
ture Wallace. It may not be poss- 
ible to induce many senators and 
cabinet secretaries to learn how Ki 
milk but some people feel that it 
would be a good thing if every bov 
could spend some time working on a 
farm. 

He would thereby be taught to uso 
his head and v hands more, and hired 
service less. Also auch an every day 
art as milking would teach him 
something. ^Learning how to so in- 
fluence the cow that she would giv 
milk freely, might help him later in 
the art of influencing people, who 
orten show cow like traits. 



Th e idea of s e lf c o ntrol -thTC 
some form of mental exercise or an- 
alysis was tremendously taking, an J 
many people have been and are in- 
terested and helped by it. But th« 
Public attention can not be focused 
long on any one point. 

Some of the people in the book 
business say that for 1924, the pub- 
ic demand is going to be for 
thoughts of optimism. People are sick 
of the prophets of decadence and 
J "* 110 are constantly shouting 
that the world is about to break up 
and civilization is going fo the dogs. 
They want the idea brought out that 
i here ,s a great deal that is fine and 
splendid in life after all, even when 
many c nditions sem bad. It seems 
likely to be a popular note. Stories 
«nd rlays that dwell on the good 
side of life, its generosity, its achieve 
jnent, ts possibilities, have alwayi 
been popular. Probably they will b<- 
more so than ever this year. 

There are plenty of wrongs that 
need to be pointed out. But it give* 
a harmful impression for people to 
dwell on the dark side. It spreads 
the idea that evil is so deeply rooted 
that it is futile to struggle against 
it. That is ail wrong. 

fh re an; 14 per cent fewer hog, 
In the ttor'l now than th*r«> wer* 
before tho war. 



Lexington, Ky.— Cooperating with 
the College of Agriculture leaders of 
the Kentucky Parent Teachers As- 
sociation are inviting every parent 



A Solid Foundation 

This bank is built on a solid foundation of a large 
Capital and a Large Surplus which speaks SAFETY 
for your deposits. 

We want to do business with you and you will 
find that we "Do things for our Customers." 

4 Per Cent 

and taxes paid on time deposits. 

C*P»Ud , . * 50.000.00 

Surplus $100,000,002 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

C. H. YOUELL, Preheat. A. W. CORN, Vi«-Pr«rid«n«. 

A. B. RENAKER, CasUsr. 
Nell H. Martin, A..t. Chier. L. C. Beemon, A*.t. Ca.hier. 

For the Years 1917 and 1923 

The principal sources from which taxes are paid 
tcky follows: • j'g 17 

Property Taxes $4,286,975 

Motor Vehicles 276,926 

Inheritances 136>512 

Railroads 727,860 

Insurance . . .... . . . . 371? 230 

rmes and Forfeitures 251 933 

Bank Deposits ," [ Q2 4*74 

State Road Funds ,'/.', 560,536, 

Gasoline Tax __!__ 

Race Tracks "..'.!!!.! 

Miscellaneous . .' .' .' .' ) .' .' .' ." . [ 2,587,092 



for the State of Kea- 

1923 

$7,070,438 

2,657,619 

2,573,826 

863,054 

838,711 

661,950 

271,905 

2,416,130 

588,087 

297,606 

3,073,175 



teuchure organization in the state to 
have representatives at the rural 
School Day Conference of the Farm 
and Home Convention at the Ken- 
tucky College of Agriculture Jan> 29 
to February 1. Speakers of national 
and international renown will ad- 
dress the conference, which will 
come to order under the chairman- 
ship of Mrs. M. L. Hull, superintend- 
et ofn Shelby County Schools. The 
committee in charge is convinced 
that this is the best rural school pro- 
jrram ever held in Kentucky. 

MOVIES TO SHOW 

FARM BUILDING 

Films, charts and lantern slides of 
sanitary equipment for bams will be 
shown at meetings of the Farm 
Buildings School to be held here in 
connection with the Farm and Home 
Convention, Jan. 29 to February 1. 
T*o illustrated lectures on "Uses of 
Clay Products on the Farm" and 
"Preservation of Lumber" will be 
given Wednesday night by T. Bish- 
op, Sec. Southern Brick and Tile Co 
of Louisville, and P. R. Hicks, Sec 
Service Bureau, American Wood Pre- 
serving Association of Chicago. 

If folks took as much interest 't\ 
politics in this country as they do 
m how to make the second payment 
we would have a real election 



CLEEK'S DISPERSAL SALR 



Thursday, January 31, 1924 

POLAND CHINAS 

35 Sows and Gilts, bred to the Grand Champion, Vala- 
dor, Cleek's Liberator and Mill Wonder. 

THESE BOARS ALSO SELL 
As everthing seUs. it shall be a chance ot a lifetime as 

I sell as good as are bred. 

AT 11:00 O'CLOCK WILL SELL ~ 1 

1 Ptander Breeding Crate. Ford Roadster with truck 
body, buckets, wood heater, etc. 

Hog Sale Commences at 12 0'Clock Sharp 

DINNER AT 11:30 

Sale will be' Held at farm two miles north of Walton on 
the Dixie Highway. Sale pavilion-rain or shine. 

J- F. CLEEK. 

Col. H. H. Iglehart & Son, Auctioneers. 
F. D. Hengst, Farmers Home Journal. 



■»»■ 



PAGE 



BOONE CPU NTT RECORDER 



• *m-*r****- *"*\ 



AW, WHAT'S THE USE 



Ky L.K.VanZc!ni 

tl Wrjlrrr Ncwjpipw Union 



Atta Boy, Felix! 



in The i^ t place tou have no 

BUSINESS LOOklNvj IN HEG f?OOM & 

in The 2"-° place You'd better 
pick up your own 



<Hr3 l<!> MX ROOM AN' 

I'm gonna do as i 

PLE/WE IN IT P 



VArt UvVu-» 




Assemblymen introduced 156 bills 
providing for 25 "cents on $100 real- 
ty tax two and one-half and thn e 
per cent coal tax; numerous roa'l 
projects; approoriation bills for th.> 
Geological Survey; for the School oi i 
the Blind, for the State Fair Poultiy I 
Building; increasing tax on oil from \ 
one tn two cents; and many miscel- 
laneous bills. 

Committees met to consider hill 
returned from the printer. 

Senate unanimously, and House 
to t'i, decided a joint session Tuesday, 
.January 20, at 1 :30 o'clock to he : 
oppo"— *• of the $75,000,000 Ad- 

ministraia,, mnfd !>.-...,. cevvn ,,«■- 

tion. x 

Senate confirmed appointment !>« 
Governor W. J. Fields of R. T. Ker.- 
nard, Olive Hill, as a member of the 
Workmen's Compensation Board to 
succeed Clyde R. Levi, Ashland. 

House passed concurrent resolu- 
tions, introduced by Frank L. 
Strange, floor leader, for a joint ses- 
sion Wedneslay morning to elect 
Mrs. J. Campbell Cantrill to 
ceed Mrs. Grace Garrett Hend 
State Librarian. 

Applications for seats at the 
I>V 




John S. Ryle took his tobacco t 
Walton, last Wednesday. 

Walter Ryle is sporting a 
Ford roadster. 

There is an epidemic of whoopi r.g ' 
cough and chicken-pox in this neigh- 
borhood. 

C. L. Stephens has purchase 
new Molette cream separator. 

Cecil Williamson is doing a lot of 
blacksmithing and making sleds on 
(•count of the slick weather. 

Helen Cloro is confined to he: 
home with heart trouble. 
- Howard Aura, teacher of Mapl< 
Hill school, did not teach last Mon- 
day on account of get..'.. ^ 
the way. 

There are not many attending the 
Maple Hill school on account of ha I 
weather and mumpsr 



Six below zero Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Griffith spent 

st Friday in the city. 

Robt. Rouse, of Burlington, wat 
this neighborhood renewing firo 
insurance policies last week. 

Charles Johnson entertained thv 
Walton High School graduating class 
if nine last Friday night with a Ro *k 
part; and lunch. 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe W. Cleek anJ 
Miss Anna write that they are enjoy- 
ing their trip to Jacksonville, Fla., 
and the warm sunshine. 

Mr. Omer Atha delivered 2800 lbs., 
of tobacco to the pool at Walton la«t 
Y r.d received an advance 
of $10.00 per hundred on it. 

Burglars robbed the Beaver Lick 
Mercantile Co., store last Thursday 
night. They pred- the front door* 



Night 

coughing— 

exhausts you so that you are 
more tired in the morning 
than when you went to bed. 
Dr. King's New Discovery 
stops coughing by gently 
stimulating the 
mucous mem- 
branes to throw 
off clogging se- 
cretions. It has , 



taste. All drug- 
gists. 




HOPEFUL 

Miss Nellie Robbins was shopping 
in the city Tuesday. 

S. J. Robbins is the first in the 
neighborhood having spring lambs. 

Misses Rosa Barlow and Ora Ro' - 
were shopping in the city Fri- 

ommie Easton and wife spent last 



r - :J ci\ dinner Wedm-s- Sunday with ■— -other, Mrs. 




day evening arrive. 

Efficiency Commission recommom; 
ed alternate plan for pay-as-you-;: 
system for raising road bond issue. 

President McVey, of the State Un 
iversity, summoned before the Bud 
get Commission. 

The Legislation Committee <«/' th. 
State Board of Education started it; 
program. 

EGG LAYING CONTEST 

The winter Egg Laying Contest >- 
booming ahead in spite of the cold 
nights that have been tickling th- 
bidrlies combs. 

During the month of December E. 
G. Stephenson's flock 344 White _ 
horns hid 2468 eggs or an average 
7.2 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. B. E. Aylor's flack of 300 
White Leghorns finished in second 
place, laying 1878 eggs, or an aver- 
age of 6.3 eggs per hen. 

Roy C. Lutes flock finished in 3rd 
plaee. His flock of 187 White Leg- 
horns laid 988 eggs or an average 
of 6.3 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. A. G McMullen with a mixed 
flack of 184 Barred Rocks and White 
Leghorns got 580 eggs or an average 
of 31 eggs per hen. 

Mrs. O. C. Hafer got 120 eggs 
from-her flock of 55 Buc Rocks mak- 
ing an average of 2.1 eggs per hen. 

Considering the cold and change- 
able weather these are very good av- 
erages. 

SEEING GHOSTS 

Along about 12 o'clock last Frida • 
night some of the citizens in the 
east end of town, were awakencc 
from their slumbers by the rattling 
of chains across their porches. W. 
C. Weaver, who is not use to such 
noises after night, got up and look- 
ing out the window saw what he 
said appeared to be a large ape or 
gorilla looking through the window 



Annie 



open and got an assortment of things 
.'hoes, over shoes, overalls, socks, 
stockings, table oilcloth, canton flan- 
nel, linoleum, coffee, beans, case of 
tomatoes, gallon bucket of black pep- 
per, case eggs, box cigars, some to- 
bacco and many other things, but diJ 
not take any money. One money 
drawer had $8 in change in it and a 
lot of postage stamps, registered let 
tcrs and money orders. 




HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 

'A God Show"! 



Admission 22 Cents, 



Children 10 Cents 



w — T«X Included 



8 






Beemon 

Mrs. Susan Barlow 
.lane Beemon and da 
the past week. 

Miss Minnie Beemon spent th 
week-end with her sister, Mrs. Hai 
inn, of Hebron. 

Mrs. Laura Snyder spent Monday 
with her mother Mrs. Owen AyloV, 
of the Burlington pike. 

Miss Nellie Robbins visited Mrs. 
' Wm. Utz of the Burlington pikeva 
I couple of days the past week. 

J. M. Barlow, of Burlington, spent 
several days last week with h'.s 
| daughter, Mrs. W. P. Beemon. 

S. J. and Albert Robbins and ¥M 
Borders each delivered their crops of 



» visited M \ BI G BONE. 

ughters one day\ Q u 't«' a sudden change in the 
weather at this writing. 
^ J Miss Ruth Cleek spent Saturday 
night and Sunday with home folks. 
\ Virginia Maud Miller is visiting 
ber grandmother; Mrs; H: E; Mirier. 



RABBIT HASH. 

Wedding bells will soon be ring- 
ing here. 

Mrs. Lute Aylor is very ill with 
I mumps. 

Walter Kyle has a new Ford toil- 
' ing car. 

Truck drivers are 
i ing tobacco. 

Fillmore Ryle 
i Hubert Clore's. 

Jennie Montgomery, of Seymour, 
I I rid., is visiting at Dr. Carlyle's. 
| Robert Stephens visited his sist< 
! Mrs Lavine Stephens last week. 

Irene Scott and Paul Acia calico 



very busy ha ill - 



spent Sunday :it 



Public Sale. 

Having- decided to quit dairying I will offer for sale ;H ray resi- 
dence on the East Bend and Waterloo Pike, near 
Waterloo, Boone County, Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. 2/24 



eye treated, 
Mr. and Mrs. 



L. R. Miller 



~.~.„ ».«,,... uimrira Lllfir crops OI ~. -—..-«> uwuca !■«.-» K ll "< lO J_ 

tobacco to the Covington loose leaf low to be under the care of Tr 
market last week. fi s ' n ' l »»- *»» « **»■* ■* — 

__ Lottie Mae and Rosa Belle Rouse 

rave returned to their homes on the 
Union pike after spending several 
weeks with their cousin Viola Hor- 
ton. 



Mrs. W. R. Miller has return- d ! tu \ Helen C ! ore Sunday afternoon, 
home from the city after having h-r J * nuary » making up for winto One 3-ye; 

" weather we didn't have in December. 

a\ L5ttle IsabelIe Merrick is recover- ' old Jersey Heifers, b-tnos. old Jersey Bull, 3 2-year old 
pending a few days visiting relative.\" g fr0m an attack of double P nt ' ' 
jn Louisville. T. nia - 

Anna Dudgeon and Mrs Ra \ JL ^' 1S Crai K and family entertain- 
Sparks spent Friday with their sister,\fV e ' J ' Stc P ht ' ns Saturday night 
Mrs. Forest Black. V d bundfl y- 

Charles Jones has gone to LiWl- "— Th addie Ryle and 




family broke 
bread with Robert Hankinspn and 
G. Slater for a few days. \family Sunday. 

Mrs. Geo. Burnside was the Sat- \Mrs. Ada Ryle and daughter Wi- 
urday night and Sunday guest of he.- netta visited her parents Harry Acra 

and wife, last Thursday- 



parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lute Abdoi.. 
On account of Goebel Black's ma- 
chine catching on fire and burning 
the back of the front seat consider- 



We clipped the following from ! ab,e , he was forced to make calls oi 



"Just Among Home Folks" column 
in last Saturday's Curier-Journal : 

In Boone county one night when 
the dogs were running a fox ove\on 
Wolpers a feller told us a yarn abdVtt 
being fair-minded. He said a pack* 
peddler sold a farmer a can of flea 



horse back. 



Very few scholars are attending 
Maple Hill school which is due to 
whooping cough and chicken-pox. 



burg on Friday of last week 

powder. The peddler started"'.^ v n M f' ^ ?' Rous J. ia 8ti11 ™ry 
and the farmer stopped him ^ ^ and her edition is such that 

<to you use the stuff, he as! WelT I ^7^™^ ,s *"* <*°«btful. 

R. E 



GUNPOWDER 

Stanley Utz and wife of the Bi,? ,. 
Bone neighborhood, passed thru our I Directors and the Fnance Committee 

lor Monday, January 28th, at one 
o'clock. This meeting will be he'l 



SPECIAL BUSINESS MEETING 
Clem Kendall, President of the 
Boone County Farm Bureau has call- 
ed a special business meeting of the 



The Following Property : 

old iMule, 3-year old Government Stallion, 2 <>-ihw* 

• 
Jersey 
Heifers to be fresh in April, 8 Jersey Cows to be fresh from now 
until last of April, 2 Jersey Cows fresh now, 2-year old Jersey 
Bull, 8 Shoats. Uuroc Boar, Brood Sow, Road Wa^on. Spring 
Wagon, share in Si o Cutter, 30 joints of Meat, 18 Sid« «t 
Meat, 30 gallons of Lard, and other articles 

TERMS OF SALE 

All sums of $10 00 and under, cash; over $10.00 a credit oi 
nine months, note with approved security, payable at Peopse* 
Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. No property removed until 
j terms are complied with. 

Ernest Brown. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock ( noon ) 



in the Farm Bureau Building 
Florence. All members are urged 
to attend, as the business will be of 



FOR SALE ETC 



at him. A search failed to disclose 
any animal, wild or otherwise. Sev- 
eral other people in that end of town 
were awakened fiom their sleep bv 
the same noise. Much excitement 
and considerable alarm. was caused 
by the intruder, which next morr- 
mg proved to be a large black hound 
with * chain attached to it, and wa-, 
Jound fastened in a neighbor's yard 
fence. You can't fool Clint all the 
time. 



| said the peddler, you take the flea ' t - R " E ' Tanner finished 8t »PP'"« f°. atte " d ' as the bu< 
between your thumb and I you -mid ' hW CrOP ° f t0baCC0 ,ast week and everyone, 

die finger and you prize open his ; T delivcr lt to Wa,ton in a f o« 
mouth and drop in the powder and yS ' 

the flea dies right away. But says thi ! A cold wave struck our Ridge last 
farmer, if I had holt of the flea be- ' Satur day night which made it rath 
tween my fingers I would crush him j er uncomfortable as the chan ..? 
to death without needing to put the I came very suddenly. 

f.? Wd "J, n his moUth " Wel1 ' admitted I Miss Ida Rouse, who was an ir- 
the peddler, that is a good way, too. I mate of the Lakeland Asylum, died 
It reminded us of a story that «t that institution last week. The 
grandpap use to tell about taking a remains were brought to Slorence 
liberal view of things. Thev wa. n where annronriatP f.inAr,) nn ^ c „ 
vim mr feller ~** — ' --• *■ • * * — 



young feller put on his Suna ly w ere conducted by Rev. Runyan in 

brtches and went to see his gal. The the M. E. church of which she wai 

gais lolks had painted the front • member, after which the remain 

porch and the young feller histel were buried in the Florence cemeter • 

nisself onto the porch and there ne b y those of her mother who preceded 

set with his laigs hanging down anJ her to the gave several years ago 

tne seat of his britches freezing onto She leaves a father, several broth- 

me paint. He set there till time to ers and sisters and a host of friends 



inlftA 



A coat of fresh bright paint will 
make your ki tc h e n a p l e asanter plac - M 



to work. Try it. Use Foy's. 
Conner, Florence, Ky. 



Hop- 



FARM FOR RENT 

Farm of 135 acres will rent on the 
shares, 10 cows, tobacco and corn 
ground, nice new four room house 
to good tenant. Also for sale 75 
ewes. Apply to 

H. L. McGLASSON. 

olGjan — pd Hebron, Ky. 



Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. I.) Put Up 
with Rata for Years 

"^«« n »S° I got some r»t poison, which near • 
•"lied our fine watch dog. We put up with rati 
until • Mrnd told me about Rat-Snap. It turcl.- 
kjjb tats, though houMpett won't touch it." Rats 
dry up and leave no tmell. Pricea.3Sc.6Sc.tt.25. 

Sold and ruaraoteed by 
Gulley & Pettit, D. R. Blytbe. 



Mrs. Crandkll (Iowa) Tela. How She 
Stopped Chicken Loose* 

"U»t spring, rats killed all our baby chicks. Wish 
I'd known about Rat-Soap before. With just one 
Utie package we killed swarms of rats. They won't 
get thlayaai't hatches. I'll bet" Rat-Stop is guir- 
aotced and sells lot J5c. 65c. 11.25. « 

Sold and guoxautccd by 

Oulley A Pettit, Burlington. Kv. 

.IX R. Blythe Burlington, Wy." 



HALE AND. HEARTY AT 83. 



go home and the gal had to git her 
menfolks to sow her sweetheart loose 
from the porch. That evening when 
the young feller got home he sidled 
around the wall and started upstai s 
backwards. His mamma hollered at 
lV"u d ° St Why . he w " going up 



to mourn her departure. 



L. S. Beemon, who resides about a 



lington and Florence pike, passed 
eighty-third mile post along the jour- 
ney through life, last Thursday, Jan. 
l<th, was in town that day looking 
nale and hearty, aiyj from his looks 
and actions promises to be here 
niany more years. He walks from his 
home to Burlington and back and 
seems to enjoy the walk. He can read 
the newspapers without glasses. F ,; 
the last two or three months he has 
been making his home with his 
niece, Mrs. J. B. Rouse. 



any, said the young feller. 



PT. PLEASANT. 

Another one of Pt. Peasant's old- 
est citizens passed away January ] 7, 
1924. Mr. Carl Zimmer was born in 
West Baden, Germany, 78 years a^o 
and has resided here more than 60 
years. His wife preceded him to the 



W. B. Arnold snd sister, Miss 
flora, of Belleview, and their guests, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Huey, f Ply- 
mouth, 111., attended the poultry 
meeting at the court house, Tuesday 
afternoon. While in town they 
made the Recorder office a pleasant 
eel). 



— ■- — ...•». ^....vcucu in iii iu tne 

There are three kinds of givers Krave 8bc y ears ft «*° eaving him very 
the flint, the sponge and the honey- 8ad and lonelv - He was laid to rest 
comb. To get anything out of flint {* x - her >lde •«> Constanmmmmuuukg 
you must hammer it, and then you y her aide in Constance cemtery 
get only chips and sparks. To get la8t S *turday afternoon. He leaves 
water out of a sponge you mu^t ^ mourn nim three daughters, a son 
squeeze it,. and the more you squeeze and severaI grandchildren and a hoi-t 
the more you will get. But the honey of 0,d friend> •"«• neighbors. 
comb just overflows with its own Mr - Brice Mayhew died Jsn. 14th, 
sweetness. Some people are stingy 1924 aged 61 years at his home near 
and hard they give noChing away if Sayler Park on Lower River Road, 
tney can help it; others are gool na. after a lingering illness due ta 
tured and yield to pressure, giving Bent's disease. He was tenderlv 
occasionally; fe w dt ,| tht jn ^ care<1 f or by hin faithful wife am , 

wthout being asked at all, and of hii 'avorite cousin Mrs. Marls Dar- 
these the Bible says: "The Ixird lov b y. w »»o went to his bedside and sd- 
eth a cheerful giver." To which cl««., ministered unto him until th- sum- 
do you belong?— Ex. mons came. Mr. Mayhew will be 

About nine- hundred sut., owtttft «• was very kind and plrs.snt to *>v 
Have secured their 1924 llf«.,,H..tHg« «ryone. 



For Sale — Three Mammoth Bronze 
Turkeys, 1 yearling and two your.,; 
gobblers $10.00 each. They are th? 
monarch of poultrydom. Finest breed 
Mrs. J. W. Carpenter, Union, Ky. 
o31jan— 2t 



We try to satisfy you with sleds. 
We like to make you want more of 
o.t line as you grow older. Mad.* 
!y CONNER & KRAUS, Florence, 
Ky. Agents: Walton Lumber Co., 
Walton, Ky., and Aubrey Finn, Bur- 
lington, Ky., Route 1. 

For Sale— Fresh cow. T. B. tested. 
Yancy Clore, Telephone 189. 



WANTED — Crop tenant, prefer 
man with some help of his own. A| 
ply to C. O. Hempfling, Taylorsport, •# 
Ky. o24jan— 2t |* 

For Sale — Laundry Queen Electric 
washer 32 volt, almost new. Lopper 
tub, aluminum wringer $150. Ma- 
chine for $75.00. H. R. Leidy, Flot 
ence, Ky. 




WANTED— Man to raise three or 
four acres of tobacco. C. L. Cropper. 
Idlewild, Ky. 17Jan— tf 



Found— Yellow Collie dog wit/i 
ring around neck. Raymond Beemon, 
Florence, Ky. it 



For 'Sale— Estey Organ in good 
condition. Mrs. Lewis L. Stephens, 
Burlington, Ky. it— p 



1 



WANTED 

Man to raise three or four ucruj 
of tobneco and work by the dsy. 
Hourp, garden and cow pasture fur- 

n ■ lied 

< ! Cropper, Idlewild, Kv 
24Jsn- tf 



For Sal* -Three fresh row* v,J\ 
.slv^s by their side J. II Khun*, 
hurbnglon, Kv Stui Route 



WANTED— Good tenant or hired 
man to raise crop on shares, married 
rae-n prefered, house snd garden 
furnished. Apply to L. A. Scott, De- 
von, Ky. Phone Independence 1703. 
olfeb — 4t pd 

For Sale — Barred Rock Cocereis. 
Fine barring. Bred to lay. Mrs. B. (J 
Graddy, Burlington, Ky., R. D. 1. 
Consolidated phone No. 266. 
o24jsn — pd 

NOTICE— See m7b7 RkeT^abbit 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford oars 
and Ford Tractors. 



RUCKING 



OF ALL KINDS DONE BY 

Walter R. Huey 

f. <^RENCE, KY. 

Prices Res.u, . V. Give M« a Trial. 

K.m. 416.X 



Hair* Catarrh 
Medicine 2*2vz 

rid tour rrwem of Catarrh or Deafness 
csused by Cscsrth, 

*»*• h *«**»** /W ~m 40 sot. 

t I CHENEY 4a CO., Toledo, Ohio 



NOT..' s. 
All persons inde. . i to Thomas 
Corcoran, deeeased, v...] please oomo 
forward and pay same. All per sot ■, 
having claims against said estate wll 
present same proven as the haw in- 
quires. 

MICHAEL CORCORAN, 

Bxecutoi 

WANTED— To rent farm- i 
rent on the share or money rent 
prefer money rent, would like stem 
located near school und on gocni 
road, one that will do for dairy farm 
and some good tobacco and cor,» 
land. 7 or 8 fteVM of tobacco und Jw 
acres for corn. 

CHE3TER HILL, 
IdW-wdd, h 
o30juu4t pd 

California has u million auterw 
biles. That* rnough to rum an> 
ststc. 



PAGE 



T 



■i 



AO obitnvM., card of tkaak* uJ 
all <*W ■w'ltMkAst Btm, rat b« 
»*M for at 8 cwKFpcr lia«. 



BuKittsburg Baptist Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Pastor. 

Sunday School erer? Sunday at 
X«.00 a. m. 

B ag ttl e t preaching Mirlcaa on tha 
* and Third 6undaya in 
•t 11:00 a. m. 



Mtthodist Episcopal Church. 

REV. P. G. GILLESPIE Pastor 

Florence aad Burlington Charge 

FLORENCE 

Firatand Third Sundays 11 a. m. 

Sundly School 9:30 a. m. 
(MiM Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 

Bpworth League every Sunday at 
€ p. m. 
(Misa Mamie Robinson, President) 

Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:80. 
BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at 10 
a. m. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 
Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 



BIRTHDAY OF BENJAMIN FRANK 

L1N TO BE CELEBRATED 

BY FREEMASONS 



BOONE 



Petersburg Baptist Church. 

REV. O. J. CHASTAIN, Pastor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 

a. m. --. 

Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sunday 11 a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 
B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. GEO. A. ROYER, Pastor. 
Sunday J«n uar y 27th. 
Hof^ful 9:?° - <- '- ScJvool. 
Hopeful 7 p. m., Luther League. 
Hebron 1:30 p. m., Sunday School. 
Hebron 2:30 p. m., Regular service. 
Hebron 3:30 Teacher Training. 



Burlington Baptist Church 

REV. W. W ADAMS, Pastor. 

Business Meeting Saturday 2 p. m. 
Prayer meeting Saturday 7 p. m. 
C. L. Gaines Leader. 
Bible School 10 a. m. 
No preaching morning or evening. 
Young People's Work 6 p. m. 



, Very little cor.;:.-.^ _..J ga&g the 
paat few days — too cold. 

F. H. Rouse and wife have been 
•.nite sick for several days. 

Mrs. L. T. Utz has been quite sick 
for several days with tonsilitis. 

Mrs. Ellen Crigler, of Florence, is 
the guest of her daughter, Mrs. W. 
C. Weaver. 

Rev. and Mrs. J. W. Garber, of 
Union, spent Saturday with Mr. and 
Mra. L. T. Ut*. 

On account of the very cold weath- 
er very there is very little stirring in 
the way of news. 

The mercury ir the thermometer 
Monday morning registered 4 below 
zero in Burlington. 

Mrs. J. M. Thompson, of Aurora, 
Ind., is the guest of her daughter 
Mrs. R. E. Berkshire. 

Town Marshall W. F. Grant, cf 
Florence, was transacting business 
in Burlington, Monday. 

Geo. H. Gordon and'C. W. Riley, 
of Hebron, were business visitors to 
Burlington, last Saturday. 

Out of about fifteen hundred dogs 
assessed in the county only about 
five hundred have secured license. 

Miss Myrtle Beemon, of Gunpow- 

Fder, has been the guest of her sister. 

Mrs. L. C. Weaver, for several days. 

Lyman Rice, manager for the T. 
W. Spinks Co., Erlanger, was tran?- 
acting business in Burlington, Mon- 
day. % 

Postmaster Hickman has been con- 
fined to his home for several days. 
His wife and son have been running 
the postomce. 

Zelma Clore and daughter, Hazel 
Marie, and Martha Kelly, were the 
peasant guests of J. W. Kelly and 
wife, Sunday afternoon. 

Wh a t h as becom e o f t h e uld time 



Freemasons of the world celebrat- 
ed the birthday of Benjamin Frank- 
lin that occurred on January 17tn, 
which was the 218th anniversary of 
his birth. Franklin looms large among 
the distinguished Masons who took 
a conspicuous part in the American 
Revolution. 

Benjamin Franklin became a mem- 
ber of St. Johns Masonic Lodge, 
Philadelphia, in the year 1730. In 
1784 he was elected Grand Master 
of Masons of Pennsyvania; from 
1735 to 1738 served as Secretary of 
St. Johns Lodege; in 1749 was Pro- 
vincial Grand Master; in 1776 af- 
filiated with Masonic Lodges in 
France; in 1777 was elected a mem- 
ber of Lodge des IX Soeurs (Nine 
Sisters or Muses) of Paris. He as- 
sisted at the initiation of Voltaire 
in the lodgd of the Nine Sisters in 
1778; in 17&? was ele^rd "rr.c— tic 
Master of Loge des IX Soeurs ;""in 
1782 became a member of Lodge De 
Saint Jean de Jerusalem, of which 
lodge he later was eected Venerable 
d'Honneur. 

He was on the committee which 
drafted the Declaration of Independ- 
ence and was one of the signers. 

Franklin was appointed Postmas- 
ter General for the Colonies in 17C3 
and in the following year he was 
commissioner from Pennsylvania at 
the Inter-colonial Congress at Al- 
bany which met to consider the im- 
pending French and Indian War. He 
was of much assistance to General 
Braddock during the war. When the 
descendants of Wiliam Penn refus- 
ed to allow their private lands to be 
taxed for the support of the Englisi 
li •><»*, he was sent to England to 
etition the Crown, against this. His 
influence helped secure the repeal of 
the Stamp Act in 1766. 

His famous kite experiment was 
mrde in 1762. His scientific views 
won acceptance by both England and 
France and the degree of LL.D. was 
given him by Oxford, Edinburgh and 
Saint Andrews, as a recognition of 
his pre-eminence in scientific inves 
tigation. 

He founded the Philadelphia Pub- 
ic Library, the first American pub- 
lic library, in 1731. Under the pseu- 
donym of Richard Sanuders he be- 
pan the publication of Poor Rich- 
ard's Alamnac and for twenty-fiv • 
years his witty sayings hebW to 
mold the character of the people of 
that time. 
^Franklin's early life was a seSes 
of adventures such as could only be 
exve lenced in the unsettled period 
of pre-revolutionary times. His par- 
ents intended him for the ministry 
but lis deistic sentiments caused 
him to turn from the churches and 
enter business. He secured control of 
a paper called the Pennsylvania Ga- 
zette, winning commendation thru- 
out the colonies for his printing and 
the spirit of his writings. 

He died April 17, 1790, and was 
buried in the graveyard of old. Christ 
Church in Philadelphia. 



WINNING BUSINESS CONFI- 
DENCE. 

When a person starts out to buy 
some household or personal article, 
he does not in the majority of cases 
know much about the thing he -s 
buying. Even if it is anything as sim- 
ple as a pair of shoes, he can not al- 
ways tell by the looks of the thing, 
as to whether it will give good ser- 
vice or not. There are so many ways 
py which inferior material can be 
covered up and camouflaged, that a 
great deal of poor stuff looks very 
well. 

"*'v. purchaser commonly rec- 

ognizes and views the stuff handed 
out to him with a certain degree of 
skepticism, unless indeed it is offer- 
ed at such high prices that he feeli 
it must be good. Even then the pri-o 
may be too high for the actual value' 

When a person holding that atti- 
tude discovers that the article offer 
ed to him is from some make that 
has been wisely advertised, his 
point of view changes. The advertis- 
ing gives him confidence. The stuff 
must be put out by a successful con- 
cern, he thinks, or they would n »t 
advertise as they do. And it must 
have given satisfaction to a multi- 
tude of people or people would nac 
dare to send money in pushing it. 

If this truth applies specially *<j 
lines of stuff that one sees advertis- 
ed in magazines and newspapers all 
over the country, it fits equally well 
in the matter of retail trade. Peop' » 
have to purchase a great deal of 
stuff of which they do not feel them- 
selves to be competent judges. They 
feel that they must depend upon fie 
integrity of the stores to give them 
good value, and must trust to their 
enterprise and efficiency to get mod- 
erately low prices. 

The fact that a store advertises 
freely tends to give them confident 
m it. They feel that such a store 
must be doing. „_.; business, it 
must be pleasing the public, its gooda 
must give satisfaction, or its owners 
would never push their goods 
they do. 




as 



men and boys in years gone by that 
use to go to the woods this time of 
year and cut wood to keep warm? 

W. T. Carpenter, from out on R. 
D. two, was transacting business in 
Burlington, last Thursday morning 
and while in town called in to s^e 
the printers. . 

Last Saturday people were stand- 
ing around on the streets enjoying 
the sunshine, and Sunday morning 
they were standing around a red-hot 
stov? freeding to death. 

W. R. Rogers and sisters, Misses 
Sallia and Elizabeth have had a ra- 
dio installed in their residence, and 
are now receiving messages from all 
ports of the United States. 

Fred Hell, one of the Recorder's 
good friends from Point Pleasant 
neighborhood, was transacting busi- 
ness m Burlington, Monday. He 
rolled at this office and had his sub- 
scription looared another year. 

Peter Hager and Mrs. Clarence 
Long, of Rabbit Hash precinct, were 
business visitors to Burlington, last 
Thursday. While in town Mr. Hagot 
called on the Recorder and had 
Mrs. Isabelle McMurray's named r |- 
ded to our list of readers, for which 
they have our thanks. 



The $75,000,000 bond issue, advo- 
cated by Governor Felds, is attract- 
ing the attention of the voters of our 
C ommonwealth. This subject should 
receive the thoughtful consideration 
of every one before he should eith- 
er condemn or advocate the bond is- 
sue. It does not seem proper that 
a road bond issue should be connect- 
ed with a bond issue to pay the in- 
debtedness of the state and to im- 
prove the State University and other 
public institutions. The different bond 
issues should be submitted in surh 
a way that one would not depend on 
the other for its passage. You mnv 
be In favor of issuing bonds fir cer- 
tain purposes and against issuing 
bonds for another purpose. 

The Covington Good Roads As- 
sociation has gone on record against 
the increase of two cents on each 
gallon of gasoline for road purposes. 
We are not surprised at their action, 
although we believe that no method 
of raising revenue for road purpos- 
es has been advanced that is as just 
and fair as a gasoline tax. If yo j 
do not use the roads, you use no 
gasoline and you pay none of this 
tax, if you do operate your machine 
then it takes gasoline to propel it 
and you pay your toll for the use of 
t h e highw a y, an d that lull 



HOOVER FAVORS RAILROAD 
CONTROL. 

Senator LaFollette and his polit- i 
ical associates in Congress, are de- 1 
termmed to make good their promise I 
to the people to change the railroad i 
rate law. Mr. LaFollette has intro- ' 
duced a bill that proposes to fix th<- I 
rates on "the basis of cost of ser- 
vice." This would mean the actual 
operating est, ? {us interest and a 
fair dividend for stock that repre- 
sents actual money invested. 

u-.F° c ! lowing the introduction of this 
bill Secretary Hoover, in an address 
before the transportation conference 
at Washington, advocated "optional 
Federal incorporation" for consolida- 
tion purposes- His proposition would 
take the roads out of state control 
entirely and put them under Fed- 
eral organization committees with 
public representatives. 

This was the plan advocated by 
Senators Newlands and LaFoylette, 
just before we entered the world 
war and just before Senator New- 
•and s -sudden death and at that time 
the railroads who insisted on bein"- 
taken over by the government, offer 
ed but little opposition. It seems to 
be the only plan that will produce 
the desired results in our transpor- 
tation problem, but because the Fed- 
eral Government would have repre- 
sentatives on each Board of Direc- 
tors of these great consolidate*: 
companies, it will be bitterly oppos- 
ed by the railroad speculators on 
the ground that it savors of Federal 
control. 



123,607 

Actual retail deliveries 
tn December, establish- 
ing a new high record 
tor winter buying. 



Starter and Demountable Runt S8S.OO Extra 

Why You Should Order 
Your Ford Car Now 

Considering that, as spring ap- 
proaches, retail buying will become 
more active, there will be a greater 
demand for Ford Cars this spring 
than ever before. 

Therefore, the only way you can 
be sure of obtaining delivery this 
coming spring or summer is 
to place your order immediately. 

It you do not wish to pay cash for 
your car you can arrange for a smalt 
payment dan**> ind *n — tmu on 
the balance. w< » - 

the Ford Weekly Purcnase nan. 

See the Nearest Authorized 
Ford Dealer 

*~^ ^\^ Detroit, Michigan ^ 





NOTICE 



All persons having claims against I 
the estate of Eugenia Blythe, de 
ceased, will present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. All person; 
owing said estate will settle same 
at once. 

A. B. RENAKER, 

Executor 



aCaCOUR TESYgagT 



SERVICE 

FIRST 



1 JC-JST ABIUTY& gB 

A Solid Foundation 



LEARN TO PICK A 



200 EGG HEN 



This bank is built on a solid foundation of a large 
Capital and a Large Surplus which speaks SAFETY 
for your deposits. 



-j. -..- ....... von Is Just m 

the proportion to the amount you 
operate .your automobile. With a 
tax of three cents on a gallon of gas 
oune the average touring car would 
be paying about one-third of a cent 
Per imle while under the old toll 
rate you paid two cents per mile for 
a horse and buggy and four cents 
per m,le for a two-horse wagon. 
Three cents a gallon tax on gaso 
line is not excessive and we find a 
number who advocate a five-cent tax 
on each gallon of gasoline. 

LESSONS FROM THE FARM 

A milking contest was held the 
other day between Senator Magnus 
Johnson and Secretary of Ajrricul- 

SCJREE: !t m ** not £w 

ible to induce many senators and 
cabinet secretaries to learn how N 
milk but some people feel that it 
would be a good thing if every bov 
could spend some time working on a 
farm. • 

He would thereby be taught to uw 
his head andv hands more, and hired 
service less. Also such an every day 
art as milking would teach him 
something. ^Learning how to so in- 
fluence the cow that she would *hn 
milk freely, might help him later in 
the art of influencing peoplo, who 
often show cow like traits. 



A TIME FOR OPTIMISM 

Among the people who feel close'y 
the currents of popular sentiment, 
are the publishers of books. They 
find that the kind of thing that wiil 
sell well at one period, will fall flat, 
at another. The desire for certain 
types of thought passes over the 
country like a wave. 

The demand for sex novels and 
P'ays has been one such wave. Auth- 
prs of a certain type have been pour- 
ing out these stories and drama* 
"•it somt people woh are closely in 
-outh with the public taste say that 
M passing. 

There was a big call about a year 
ago for works on practical psycho- 
logy. The ' 



Lexington, Ky. — If you can't tell 
a slacker hen from a high-produc- ! 
ing hen then attend the demonstra- 
tion on judging for egg production 
to be given by O. B. Kent, originator 
of the present system of culling 
flocks, at the Farm and Home Con-; 
vention, Kentucky College of Agri-, 
culture, January 29 to Feb. 1. 

Numerous high and low producing 
hens will be one feature of the ex- 
hibits and opportunity will be given 
those who attend to select the hens 
whose egg laying records exceed 200 
eggs per year. Culling hens far, ac- 
cording to J. Holmes Martin of the 
Poultry Department, has been one of 
the prncple means of increasing pro- 
duction m farm flocks, but with bet- 
ter knowledge of poultry it becomes 
necessary for poultrymen to select 
breeding stock from their flocks. It 1 
has been his purpose in bringing Mr. 
0. B. Kent to the convention to 
show just how this selection may be 
accomplished and how poultrymen ' 
throughout the state may make se- 
lections for their breeding pens this' 
spring by noting the special charac- 1 
teristics of a high-producing bird 
without having tranpnest records. 



We want to do business with you and you will 
find that we "Do things for our Customers.'' 

4 Per Cent 

and taxes paid on time deposits. 

Capital $ 50.000.00 

s on>lus $100,000,002 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

C. H. YOUELL, Pre_d« B t. A. W. CORN, Vice-Pr..i<W. 

A. B. RENAKER, Caihier. 
Nell H. Martin, A«t. Cadiier. L. C. Beemon, A*.t. Ca.hier 



KC3C__2__SC___C__XHK 



For the Years 1917 and 1923 
The principal sources from which 



— oclf e o nt r ol th r u 
some form of mental exercise or an- 
alysis was tremendously taking, an J 
many people have been and are in- 
terested and helped by it. But th* 
Public attention can not be focused' 
long on any one point. 

Some of the people in the book 
business say that for 1924, the pub- 
ic demand is going to be for 
thoughts of optimism. People are sick 
of the prophets of decadence and 
those who are constantly shouting 
that the world is about to break up 
and civilisation is going tb the dogs. 
They want the idea brought out that 
'here is a great deal that is fine and 
splendid in life after all, even when 
many c nditions sem bad. It seems 
iiK<;Iy to be a popular note. Stories 

"w r l ay8 that dwel1 on *« Rood 
side of hfe, its generosity, its achieve 
ment, ts possibilities, have alwayj 
been popular. Probably they will b<- 
more so than ever this year. 

There are plenty of wrongs that 
need to be pointed out. But it gives 
a harmful impression for people to 
dwell on the dark side. It spreads 
the idea that evil is so deeply rooted 

>t. That is all wrong. 

I"h re .nv U p,. r cent fewer ho K , 
in the worJl now tftan th 

1 i 'ore the war. 



STATE PARENT-TEACHERS 

MEET AT UNIVERSITY 

Lexington, Ky.— Cooperating with 
the College of Agriculture leaders of 
the Kentucky Parent Teachers As- 
sociation are inviting every parent 



tcky follows: j j^ 

Property Taxes , $4,286,975 

Motor Vehicles 276 926 

Inheritances 136!512 

Railroads 727,860 

Insurance 371,230 

Fines and Forfeitures 251 933 

Bank Deposits .' [ g2 474 

State Road Funds ;--." 560,536, 

Gasoline Tax _____ 

Race Tracks .!!!!!! 

Miscellaneous '.'.'.'.'.'.. .* 2,587,092 



taxes are paid for the State of Kea- 



1923 
$7,070,438 

2,657,619 

2,573,826 
863,05* 
838,711 
661,950 
271,905 

2,415,180 
588,037 
297,500 

3,073,175 



tea c h er s organization I n t he state to 
have representatives at the rural 
School Day Conference of the Farm 
and Home Convention at the Ken- 
tucky College of Agriculture Jan. 2^ 
to February 1. Speakers of national 
and international renown will ad- 
dress the conference, which will 
come to order under the chairman- 
ship of Mrs. M. L. Hull, superintend- 
et ofn Shelby County Schools. The 
committee in charge is convinced 
that this is the best rural school pro- 
gram ever held in Kentucky. 

MOVIES TO SHOW 

FARM BUILDING 

Films, charts and lantern slides of 
sanitary equipment for barns will be 
shown at meetings of the Farm 
Buildings School to be held here in 
connection with the Farm and Home 
Convention, Jan. 29 to February 1. 
Two illustrated lectures on "Uses of 
Clay Products on the Farm" and 
"Preservation of Lumber" will be 
given Wednesday night by T. Bish- 
op, Sec. Southern Brick and Tile Co 
of Louisville, and P. R. Hicks, Sec 
Service Bureau, American Wood Pre- 
serving Association of Chicago. 

If folks took mh much interest ■ , 
politics in this country as they do 
in how to make the second payiuant, 
we wuuld have u real election 



CLEEKS DISPERSAL SALE 



Thursday, January 31, 1924 

POLAND CHINAS 

35 Sows and Gilts, bred to the Grand Champion, Vala- 
dor, Cteek's Liberator and Mill Wonder. 

THESE BOARS ALSO SELL 
As everthing sells, it shall be a chance ot a litetime as 

I sell as good as are bred. 

AT 11:00 O'CLOCK WILL SELL 

1 Ptander Breeding Crate. Ford Roadster with truck 

body, buckets, wood heater, etc. 

Hog Sale Commences at 12 0'Clock Sharp 

DINNER AT 11:30 

Sale will be held at tarm two miles north of Walton on 

the Dixie Highway. Sale pavilion-rain or shine. 

J. F. CLEEK. 

Col. H. H. Iglehart fie Son, Auctioneers. 
F. D. Hengst, Farmers Home Journal. 



mmm 



P*. 



■■ 



aa%*»)aa*sm«BBBa-ameges*x*»»nsaa*ssl 



BEee^eaaaeaaBBBaaaaaaaaai 



J 



^m. 



*»ACE POUR 



BOONE COUNTY RtCORDIR 



The shortest days come aft" 
'Christmas, both as respects sunlight 
and cash. 



>!i think that real estate 
'is a little too "rear' when they jro to 
pay their taxes. 

I ring l-'L'.'! aboul $65,000,000 
■worth of diamonds were Imported it ■ 
to the United States. 



So far not many people have 
pressed fear of being struck 
presidential lightning. 



ex- 



it's a tine thing for a man !o 
marry his soul mate, but she needs 
to know how to cook muffins. 



Denied that there is any revolu- 
tion in Mexico. Merely their way of 
Carrying on a pilitical campaign. 



Chicago man tried to prove him- 
sell insane to inherit $-100,000. Mos.. 
anybody would go erazy for that. 



Germany must be normal again. 
The automobile business is the only 
kind reported to be doing any good. 



llcnry Ford might-he. a good .pres- 
ident after all. judging by his tt 
titude regarding President Coolidge. 



Many 
holding 
down chairs 
on. 



at these bandits who are 

up citizens, will be holding 

n jail cells if thev keen 



Large tracts of land are bain*; 
irrigated in .Java with a view to fur- 
ther developing the growth of sue,:' 
cane. 

Many citizens feel that a case of 
daylight hold-up occurs when thev 
j*et the demand for an b&. 
return. 



The younsr people are urged to 
train their muscles, and so far they 
have shown no objection to playing 
base ball. 



The peoples of the world groati 
about their war debts, but if they 
were all paid off they might get to 
lighting again. 



Elderly man and woman celebra.^ 
iid sixty-six years of wedded life the 
other day. Sixty-six hours is the n.-- 
.•rage nowadays. 

The opinion prevails through the 
•northern states, that in spite" of pro- 
hibition, the thermometer has taken 
a drop too much. 



The great exposition of road build- 
ing material, methods, and machinery 
in Chicago which emphasizes as nev- 
er before the position which -high- 
way construction and use is to taki 
in this country. Here, under one rooi 
are gathered together such an edue.i 
t jonal exhibit of all that pertains jj 
highway making as the world has 
never seen. Road builders from all 
oyer the country are attending; roa I 
buyers have set tnheir representa- 
tives to see what progress has been 
made in the art; road users come to 
see whether or not their own roads 
are up to the best standard, and if 
the money their communities are 
spending is being wisely spent. 

Attracting a major aount of the 
attention of the visitors are the two 
exhibits which have nothing to sell , 
nothing to gain except the spread of 
an idea. The Bureau of Public Roads, 
Department of Agriculture has a 
highly educational exhibit, showiny 
the work of the bureau, the adminis- 
tration of the Federal aid roads acts, 
and the right of way to build roads. 
The National Highways Association, 
occupying a great space across the 
end of the gallery, shows very large 
and elaborate maps, illustrating the 
idea back of the association. It shows 
with literature and other exhibits its 
educational work looking to the cre- 
ation of .national sentiment for the 
theory taht the Xatinal Government 
should build, own, control, and for- 
ever maintain a system of National 
Highways to which States would 
build feeder roads, which in turn 
Would be served by county and town- 
ship roads. 

The great thrones of people com- 
ing to the Coliseum are but an ind'- 
eation of the itenrest we, as a peo- 
ple, take in the highway transporta- 
tion problem, and the absolute nee 
*. this Government taking tl\« 
next step in its solution, which, is, of 
course, the creation of a National 
Highway Commission to locate and 
build the first of the truly national 
roads. 



When, 

they 

Cough 

i$ f 

IMP ; S 

BALSAM 




The govn-nrnent might try a little 
>:ral application j.fter its successful 
'effort to preveit the importation „>f 
arrrt int.-. &levc«s. 



Whether the ground hog brings 
spring or six weeks of winter all de- 
pends on whether you are an opti 
mist or a pessimist. 



Before ^vUrnvg the political cam- 
""Pfffi 1 ' il is wen to remember that an 
empty fishhorn woud make more 
•noise than a full one. 



Leap Year may not have brought 
any more marriages so far, possiblv 
because the bachelors have alrealy 
learned that they must keep closely 
under cover. 



A tribe of Indians are said to con- 
verse by a whistling language. Per- 
hapsthey learned this from the kids 
who imitate the whistling of tlr> 
wind during school hours. 



The American people are urged to 
return to the ways of the father', 
but folks in Burlington seem to pre' 
fer to lie abed in the morning and 
•quit work early at night. 

The Sears Roebuck Co., mail or- 
der business added over 1,000,000 
new customers to their list last year, 
and the business increased more than 
18 per cent over 1912, with a total 
of $215,540,000. The little single re- 
tailer who fights his competitor down 
the street, has something here- worth 
thinking about. 



Gra i n tr a d e r s are of th e opiiiiin 

that wheat prices must drop. Canadr ., 

Argentine, Australia and Russia are' 

selling wheat to Europe at nearly 10 

' cents less per bushel. In November 

' the United States imported more 

^rheat from Canada than it exported 

to all other countries, selling from 

18 to 20 cents below American prices. 

Marketing organizations offarmers 
' did more than $2,000,000,000 wort!, 
• of business last year, reports to the 
Department of Agriculture show. 
Twenty-six hundred grain organiz- 
ations show business totaling $490,- 
000,000. The co-operative Livestock 
' Commission of St. Louis, shipped 11,- 
000 cars of live stock, and saved it's 
members over $80,000 in commis- 
sions. 



From growing practically no sweet 
clover as late aa six years ago, far- 
mers of Grundy County, 111., under 
the direction of their county agri- 
cultural extension agent, have made 
sweet clover an important feature of 
their farming. The first year, 1817, 
22 farmeses tried the new crop, their 
neighbors watching the venture 
with interest. That they found the re- 
sults good is evidenced by the fact 
that there are this year, m-cording 
to reports to the United States I)e 
partment of Agriculture, Home 12, 
' 000 acres of his legume growing in 
the county, in most cases from 20 to 
30 acres on a farm. 



Although the battle of the State 
Board of Health to stamp out tra- 
choma is curbing the spread of this 
dangerous eye disease and i nsomo 
sections has eliminated it, the fact 
that in other sections of the United 
States it has gained a foothold, may 
result in the Rockefeller P'oundation 
taking a hand to determine wha» 
germ or co"ditjon causes it to strike 
incertain localities. 

The Rockefeller Foundation's at- 
tention was called to this disease by 
the Southern Medical Association and 
Kentucky is expected to reap great 
benefits from the part this great 
research institution will probablv 
take, according to Dr. A. T. McCor- 
mack, secretary of the State Board 
of Health. The United States Public 
Health Service already has entered 
the fight on the disease. 

Dr. McCormack points out that no 
specific cause of trachoma has ever 
been demonstrated or isolated al- 
though the disease has been declared 
more or less officially to be infectious 
destructive and a menace where 
prevalent. 

"Instances of confusion in diag- 
nosis from time to time due to dif- 
ference in conception of the true 
nature of the disease," he said, "It 
is of the highest importance that 
the true nature and cause of tra- 
choma be established beyond pread- 
venture of doubt, therefore the 
Southern Medical Association urg^d 
the attention of the Rockefeller 
Foundation and the United States 
Public Health Service to this situa- 
tion and asked the active cooperation 
of these institutions in an exhaus 
tive study of the etilogic factor or 
factors of trachoma." 



The idea is sometimes held that 
the public sentiment of the nation 
is created largely in great cities. It 
would come nearer the truth to say 
that the countrf towns and smaller 
cities are the places where the real 
course of the nation is being deter- 
mined. 

In big and medium-sized eities, the 
mass of the people do not do much 
thinking and studying of serious 
matters. There are millions of suci 
People in su c h environments 



who 

never read serious articles in the 
newspapers, never attend lectures 
and very rarely discuss public prob- 
lems. The men of such types read 
principally the crime and sporting 
news, and the women read fash i on 
and society notes. These people get 
their amusement from attending the 
shows and watching things going on, 
and their minds get out of the think- 
ing habit; • * 

In country town life the great ma- 
jority of the people read and think 
and discuss. They take good news- 
papers and periodicals, and read 
them thoroughly and they pay more 
attention to the editorials than they 
do o the sports. When the country 
people get together in clubs, thev 
discuss the real issues of the nation. 

So public sentiment is informed 
and intelligent in the country townr. 
When issues come up in Congress 
and the legislatures, in the churches 
and social life generally, the coun- 
try people have somewhat definit • 
opinions formed. 

So while the cities create a force 
that is often swayed by passion an i 
prejudice and superficial reasoning, 
tin- country towns present pointi or 
vuw that in the main are judicial, 
sound, and practical. It will he „' 
sad day for America, if t|„. , oimtry 
townn .v.i Hhould lost population 

enough No that thll tor.,- would be 
less influential than it || ,,t ln , 

tune 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court. 
Ezra Mllhoit's Admrx. Plaintiff 

against 
Ezra Wilhoit's Heirs et al Deft. 

By virtue, of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the Dec. Term 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause, I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at tin- 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 4th day of February, 1924, at 1 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ing property, to-wit: 

Tract No. 1. 

Lying and being near the town of 
Florence and on Bullock Pen branc'i. 
in Kenton County, Kentucky: Be- 
guiling at a stone, a corner with Lot 
No. 3 on Bullock Pen Branch, in n 
line of John Goodridge tract of land; 
thence with the lines of said tract 
n89»~E 2.33 chains; s67 4E 5.75 
chains to a stone; thence s89\sE 
6.72 chain- -ioiaf, 7.84 chains; <■- 
36 l icj 303 chains; s55' 2 e 18 links 
to a stone in a line of Wm. McClurg, 
thence with his lines up a branch 
s35 3iw 6.10 chains; s25>?w 5.30 
chains; sl8%w 1.82 chains; s55%w- 
2.04 chans; nl2e 22 links to a point 
tn the said branch, a corner with 
David Bufflngton; thence with his 
lines n87'iw 8 chains; n86Vfew 3.23 
chains to a corner of Lot No. 3; 
thence with a line thereof pasing a 
stone on the north side of the branch 
now 22.84 chains to he beginning, 
containing 35.33 acres. 

Tract No. 2. 
Lying and being in Boone and 
Kenton Counties, Kentucky, and be- 
ing Lot No. 3 in division of the lands 
of Milton Wilhoit, deceased: Be- 
ginning at a stone a corner with 
Martha C. Wilhoit's dower in th* 
Bullock Pen Branch road; thence 
with said road or nearly so and with 
the lines of Ezra Wilhoit s63e 5 33 
chains; s 82M>e 8.66 chains; n69e- 
6.45 chains; n 89 "*e 7 links to 9 
corner of Lot No. 4 passing a stone 
on the south side of the roa'd s5»- 
22.84 chains, passing a stone on the 
nrth side of the branch to a corn*- 
of Lot No. 4 in a line of David Buf- 
flngton; thence with hie Hoes n86V.- 
4 4.61 chains; s80w 8.62 chains to a 
corner of the Dower; thence with 
a line thereof nl8 w26.52 chains to 
the beginning, containing 35 acres. 

Tract No. 3. 

Lying and being in Boone Coun- 
ty, Kentucky: Beginning at a ston.i 
in the public road in a line of David 
Buffington, a corner wth Lot No. 1. 
thence with a line of Lots Nos. 1 and 
2, nl9w 34.10 chains to a corner of 
Lot No. 2 n the Bullock Pen branch 
road; thence with said road or near- 
ly so, s72*4e 11.41 chains; s83M>e- 
4.75 chains; s63y 2 e 12 links to a cor- 
ner of Lot No. 3; thence passing a 
ttone on the south side of the ro\d 
sl8e 26.52 chains, passing a stono 
on the south side of the road sl8e- 
26.52 chains, passing a stone on the 
north side of a branch to a corner 
with Lot No. 3 in a line of David 
Bffington ; thence with his lines s80w 
3.72 chains; s 68Msw 6.50 chains; 
s89w 3.05 chains to the beginning 
containing 40 acres. 

For the purchase price the 
purchaser — .with approved security 
or securities, must execute bond-—, 
bearing legal interest from the day 
of sale until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a Judgment, with 
a lien retained therein until all the 





C. H. Y0UELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Prices. 

Burlington, Ky. 
Phone Burlington 65 



DR. T. B. CASTLEMAN, 

V&,DIiNTIST«^^ 
In my new office 

Clayolo Place, Florence, KV. 

Teeth extracted painless. Bridge 

and Plate Work a S?c^>lty. 

All Work Guaranteed 



JAMES L. ADAMS 
• DENTIST 

Cohen Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



IS 



is for Xanthus. a boy of great might: 
Those dumbbells he's lifting are not very light 

Fird mother athleu Right ski* down, alone edge of vest 



Johnson, J. S. Recett and Thomas 

Hood s44%w 47.21 chains to a stone 

a cornei ..1.1. l„v_J; thence with 

Hood's line n34w 8.50 chains to a 

fence post, thence with a line of 

Hood and Russell Sparks s49Vaw 

18.70 chains to a stone; thence n35 : /t 

w 11.24 chains to a stone a corner 

with Sparks, in a line of J. M. Baker; 

thence with Baker's n49e 61 links; 

thence n39%w 12.32 chains to a 

stone; thence n47%e 5.70 chains to 

a fence post, corner with Baker and 

Thomas Ryan; thence with RyanV 

line n50e 23.06 chains to a point n 

a branch; thence n30Msw 8.00 chains-: 

to a stone with Ryan and Cleek; 

thence with Cleek's line east 10. 00 

chains to the beginning, coM-iiniriK 

One Hundred Thirty-Seven (137 " 3 

acres) more or less. ' 

For the purchase price the pur- : 

chaser.., with approved security or 

securities, must execute bond . . , i 

bearing legal interest from the day j 

of. sale until paid, and having the 

force and effect of a Judgment, with I 

a lien retained therein until all the 

purchase money is paid. Bidders will 

be prepared to comply promptly with 

these terms. 

R. E. Berkshire M. C. B. C. C. 



j4 t' «■'»' »■«■■»»»■ ««ll»l||||l|. 

With t^Hfe* 

School Claaaica 

By MARGARET BOYD 



F. W. Kassebaum & Son 

turn* k unit 

MOKUMENTS, 

H Large 8tc*ft on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

1I« Main Street. 

AURORA, IND. 



purchase money is paid. Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly with 
these terms. 

R. £. BERKSHIRE, M. C. 



Commissioner's Sale. 



Boone Circuit Court 
Mattie J. Kite's Admr Plaintiff 

against 
Rex Kite, et al. Defendant 

By virtue of a Judgment and order 
of Sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December Term 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause. 1 
shall proceed to offer for sale at th" 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 4th day of Feb., 1924, at one 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ing property to-wit: 

Beginning at a line tree a corner 
with H. II. Cleek and Bert Huffman: 
thence with Huffman's line s41%.' 
23. IK chains to a white oak tree; 
thence n&OVie 23.00 chains to a lino 
Tec on McCoy's fork of Mudlick 
creek, n corner with Huffman, Rioh- 
anl sleet and Walter Johnson. 
thence with Johnson's line sHIe 6.68 
chains to a point on the north sjdo, 
>>f the rreek; thence crossing sail 
• >eck ilOw 1.94 chains to a stone In 
a paling fence; thence with a line of 



l© by Margaret Boyd.) 

"When could they say till now, that 

talked of Rome, 
That her wide walls encompassed but 

one man?" 

— Julius Caesar. 

Caesar dominated Rome to the ex- 
tent that he seemed the only man In 
It. and Cassius, In this conversation 
with Bruto* •" t r ylng to arrive at the 
secret of Catsar* dominant person- 
ality. 

It is Klven to few of us to study a 
personality of the first rank at close 
hand as Cassius had done. The new- 
est approach we can make to it is to 
study the personality of those who 
{ can dominate an audience from a the- 
ater or opera stage. 

The secret of personality is as hid- 
den as the secret of the nature of life 
^-volume upon volume has been writ- 
ten on both subjects, but they get us 
nowhere la our study. When scien- 
tists find out whether life itself is • 
matter of chemicals, of ferments, or 
of radio-activity, then ♦'•ey wtU prob- 
ably be In a position to show why 
one man has a dominant personality 
and another Is • cipher. If life la 
proved to be a chemical function, ss 
Lavoisier thought It, then personality 
will probsbly be proved to be a mat- 
ter of excess or lack of certain chem- 
icals in the system. 

Just now the best guess as to the 
secret of personality Involves radio- 
activity. When one goes to the thea- 
ter and observes such widely differ- 



RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Covers and Opes 
Door Curtains for all make of cars. 



Boone Circuit Court, Ky 
Jacob B. Crigler's Admr., Plaintiff 

against 
Nicholas E. Crigler, et al. Deft. 
By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the August Term 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at the 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder at Public Sale on Monday,, 
the 4th day of February 1924 at 1 ent P ersona »«e» »» Caruso, Lauder, 

o'clock p. m., or thereabouts beinp GalllCurc » nnd ""*«. on « >» «t™<* 

with the fact that all these people 

are alike In the Impression they con- 
vey of tremendous, overflowing ener- 
ejsa. One Instinctively thinks of them 
when looking Into a spinthariscope. 

The spinthariscope Is a scientific 
toy that enables us to see radio-activ- 
ity. It Is a tube a few Inches long, 
containing a tiny particle of a radium 
compound, mounted In front of a spe- 
cial screen and viewed through a mag- 
nifying lens. When one looks Into It, 
continuous display of 
. as the rays 
ginning, contaimng one-half of an thrown off by the radium hit the 

acre- ! fluorescent screen. Radium, of course, 

For the purchase price the was discovered only a few years ago, 

chaser, with approved security or se* consequently no spinthariscope Is very 

eurities, must execute bond — , bear- old. We are not able, therefore, te 

ing l e gal inter es t from th e day o f ■ s ay how l ong o n e wil l keep np It s 



County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six months, the following property, 
to-wit: 

A certain lot of land situated in 
the town of Hebron, Boone County, 
pentucky; Beginning at a stone on 
the North Bend Road, a corner wich 
J. H. Tanner; thence with said ro*»d 
s4!4w 4.36 poles to a stone; thence 
s86 s >4w 17.72 poles to a stone; 
thence nl8w 4.44 poles to a stone a 
comer of J H. Tanner; thence with 

his line n86%el9% poles to the be- K parks-the flashes made 

an 



FURNITURE, BUGGIES & WAGONS 

ReuphoUtered, and Celluloid 

Lights Replaced. 



People 5 



ho use the 
lassified 
ads in this 
papar profit by them. 
The little ads bring quick 
results. What have 
you for salo or want te 
to buy. The cost Is too 
small to consider. 



J. C. GORDON 
Superintendent of Scftook j 

Of BOONE COUNTY 

Will be in his office in Burlington 

the first and second Monday and 

the third and fourth Saturday 

in each month. 



sale until paid, and having the fore* | sparkling display ; but theoretically, 
and effect of a Judgment, with a lien 
retained threin until all the purchase 
money is paid. Bidders will be pre- 
pared to comply with tfcese terms. 
R. E. Berkshire M. C. B. C. C. 



k Rat That Didn't Smell After 
, Being Dead for Three Months 

"1 iwear It wsadead three months." write* Mr. J. 
Sykas(N. J.). " I ui this r»t every day : put soma 
Rst-Snsp behind a barrel. Months afterwards, my 
wif« looked behind the barrel. There It was— dead. '! 
Eat-Snap sells In threw sizes (or 35c. 65c, SI .25. 
Sold end guaranteed by 

D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Kv. 
Oulley 4s Pettit, Burlington, Ky 



FOR SALE 

BLUE GRASS FARM 



A tine Btoek Farm, 162 acres, one 
mile from Burlington, Boone coun- 
ty, Ky., on pike, good 4 room house, 
large oonorete winter sun room, 2 
barns, other buildings, plenty water, 
splendid farm for grass, corn and 
tobacco. Prlee, 118,000, buildings 
worth more than prion of farm. For 
Information, write or see 

D. K. Castleman, Erlanger, 
or P«tnr Buchert, Newpoot, Ky. 
Jan 17-84 



It doesn't look as if Congress 
wQtfld do a great deal at this session, 
but the members may be able to lay 
ttOM corner stones and address some 
•otfaf ladle*' seminaries. 



one should last Indefinitely. » Hour 
after hour, day after day, year after 
year, that tiny particle of radium 
compound in the spinthariscope gives 
off rays, and yet never grows less In 
bulk. Similarly certain people seem 
able to give off encouragement and 
inspiration and mental stimulation 
forever, without losing anything from 
their own personalities. Those who 
have this quality dominate their sur- 
roundings as Caesar dominated Rome. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by o4dver- 
tising. 



N.'F. PENN, M D 




p/vr-SN* p 

i V KILLS RATS *r 



Better Than Traps For Rets 

Writ- AAun DtwCs. Tessa 
Thwy ear:" RAT-SNAP kdcJnstfcw work 
ead the ret undertaken ere ae do** m pop 
own en a hot stove." Try tt on your rata. 
RAT-SNAP taa "iwmwirback" gner en tee s 
teeieedr 



killer. C o m e roody for owe: nomfat- 
ksc wltt other foods. Cata and dogw won't 
tooehtt. Rata dry up and Iwavw no 

Tare* ela**! SBe for on* room: 68* for 
hou*» or chlekan yard; $1.28 for 
outbuikUnsa. Btart klllln* 

sssssss* s,h mm j r I hy 

Gu lley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R.; Blythe, Burlington, Ky 




FOR SALE 



AH opportunity of a lifetime— six 

Raleigh HMfore, age 2 inos. to one 

year; registered and transfnrrable— 

prloe S40»ux>, or will se*l singly. 

8. B RYLK A HONH, Orant, Ky 




Ky.- 

We Teat Eyes Right 



Make Glasses That 

at 

Reasonable Prices 



♦♦♦♦♦*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦*-* 
TAKB YOUR COTJlfTT PAPfcJL 

READ YOUR 

COUNTY PAPER 

$1.50 The Year. 

SabatrrtBr for Cat BBTOKOBR. 
eeeeeeoeooeeeeeeoooooeoeee 

ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE. 



Notice is hereby given that all per- 
sons indebted to the estate of B. W. 
Nelson must pay same to me. Alt 
persons who have claims against said 
estate must present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. 

COLIN KELLY. 
Admr. with th* will annexed. 



» 



w 



BOONE COUNTY RECOUIt 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 

Publiihed erery Thursday 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



Foreign AHvertwinj Representative 
THE AMERICAN PRESS ASSOCIATION 



Entered at the Postoffice, Burling- 
ton, Ky., as second-class mail. 



ADVERTISING RATES. 
Famished en application. The 
•nine of the RECORDER as an ad- 
vertising medium is unquestioned. 
The character of the adTertiaemeat* 
nsrw In its columns, and Asa ssaber 
•f them, tell the whole etery. 



The Recorder Stands For 

BETTER FARMING, BETTER CIV 

IZENS, BETTER HOMES" 



This and That. 

►>• 

Flowers that come before the fun- 
eral help to keep the undertaker 
away. 

J. E. Ryle, of East Bend, was a 
business visitor to Burlington last 
Saturday. 

More thought w advance of mar- 
riage would mean more money and 
less alimony. 

Men who fail and lose heart were 
never cast for the part of being lea J- 
ing citizens. 

Complaint is made that in some 
places when you ask for beefsteak 
they give you chewing gum. 

Although there is complaint that 
fuel costs high, many people still 
contin»«> *~ >•*-— up their money. 

It is not so difficult to think up a 
good peace plan as to think up some 
way of- getting it thru Congress. 

There are too many cracksmen 
cracking safes, and not enough of 
them cracking stone on the roads. 

While the crops improved in 1923 
urer 1922, the politicians are disap- 
pointed at the poor yield of plums. ► 

The housing situation is said tc 
be bad in many places, but the gar- 
aging situation seems to be all right. 

Not true that the poliiicians aro 
talking all the time, as they spend 
some of it listening with their ears 
to the ground. 

Claimed there is too much gossip 
is country towns, but perhaps no 
■sore than is necessary to keep some 
folks straight. 

Dances formerly used to be re- 
ferred to as "hops," but it might be 
more appropriate to call some of 
them "jumps" now. 

The bootleggers should be a little 
more careful of the stuff they sell. 
Customers located in the cemetery 
are not profitable. 

The knockers who think everything 
is badly managed, do not commonly 
offer to take hold and show how 
things should be done. 

The poets write about the pleas- 
ures of the imagination, and the 
campaign liars are getting ready to 
make the same profitable 

The people who couldn't sava 
money in December, owing to Xmaa 
presenbmnmay not be able to save 
now owing to January bills. 

A good pair of hedge clippers 
osght to come in handy around the 
house when the girls of Boone coun 
ty want their hair bobbed. 

Claimed that sound thinking is 
■ecessary, but there is so much 
sound of oratory on most of the 
wme that it is difficult to think. 

If all the proposed amendments 10 
the constitution go through, George 
Washington would not know that 
document if he met it on the street. 

No question but what the young 
crowd learn a lot at college, but the 
question arises how much they will 
have to unlearn after they get out. 

The students home for the holi- 
days succeeded in demonstrating 



t h at th e y kn e w m ore than their pro- 
fessors and the home folks combin- 
ed. 

Claimed thab President Coolidge 
will make Congress bend, and he wiU 
certainly have to do so, to adminis- 
ter the spanking that that body 
needs. 

"The old home ain't what is hsed 
to be" says the old song, but the 
difference is generally because the 
old country home has been spruced 
up so much. 

When it comes to getting married, 
the champion breadmaker of the 
•ountry is quite as likely to get «. 
good husband as the champion danc- 
er of the cities. 

President Coolidge made a great 
record' as a handshaker on New 
Year's, but it is complained that he 
did not make good as a back slap- 
per and baby kisser. 

It will not probably be necessary 
for any of the political parties to 
exercise the leap year, privilege, and 
ask somebody to officiate as their 
presidential candidate. 

The man who hasn't taken pains 
to learn more about farming this 
spring than he knew a year ago, will 
probably have any better crops in 
1924 than he did in 1923. 

Two million people may have qui; 
the country for the cities, but any- 
way that shows that those who ar* 
left behind have grown so much 
•merer that they san do sll the work 



Franchise for Sale. 

Fiscal Court of Boone County, 
Dec. 4th, 1923. 
Hon. N. E. Riddell, Judge Presiding. 

A Resolution providing for the let- 
ting at Public Bidding of the fran- 
chise right of entering upon all the 
public roads and highways of Boone 
County, Kentucky, ntcessary for the 
purpose of erecting, constructing, 
incorporating, maintaining, replacing 
and removing poles wires, brackets, 
supports, guys and all necessary ap- 
pendages thereto, and thereon, said 
poles suitable and proper to conduct 
a high voltage electric currant over 
and along any and all roads and 
highways in Boone county, now open 
or to be opened, for a period of 
twenty years from the date of ac- 
ceptance of the bid of the successful 
bidder. 

Be it resolved by the Fiscal Court 
of Boone Cqanty, Kentucky, that the 
County Clerk and be she is hereby 
appointed a committee of one to 
advertise, by three insertions in the 
Boone County Recorder that said 
Fiscal Court will receive sealed bids 
up to twelve o'clock Tuesday, Feb. 
5th, 1924, for the sale of the Fran- 
chise right and the privilege of en- 
tering upon and along all the pub- 
lic roads and highways of Boone 
County, Ky., necessary for the pur- 
pose of erecting, constructing, oper- 
ating, maintaining, replacing and re- 
moving poles, wires, brackets sup- 
ports, guys and all other necessary 
appendages thereto and thereon, 
suitable and proper to conduct a 
high voltage electric currant over 
and along the roads and highways of 
Boone County. 

All bids shall be sealed and mark- 
ed "Bid for Electric Light Franchise" 
and the Fiscal Court reserves the 
right to reject any and all bids; and 
no bids will be accepted for an 
amount less than the cost of adver- 
tising, and all bidders may in their 
discretion, make their bid for the 
cost of adversising, plus any addi- 
tional sum they may desire to bid. 

Upon the acceptance of the bid of 
the successful bidder his successors 
and assigns shall havt the right to 
go upon the roads and highways ol 
Boone County covered by this reso- 
lution and there erect, construct, 
maintain, repair cr.d opc.-te a line 
of poles and wires, brackets, cross- 
arms and all other apptndages there- 
to or thereon, and do all things nec- 
essary for the purpose of construct- 
ing, operating, maintaining, replac- 
ing or repairing or removing the ap- 
pliances-used by him or it, in — a" 
proper emplyment herein contemp- 
lated. 

None of the poles, wire, bracket*, 
Cross-arms or other fixtures shall be 
so replaced or maintained as to in- 
terfere with the travel on or the 
drainagt of any road in Boone Coun- 
ty, and any and all polee, wires and 
fixtures shall be changed upon the 
resuest of the Fiscal Court or the 
County Road Engineer of Boon? 
County, Kentucky. 

N. E. RIDDELL, 

County Judge 



TURN ME OVER 



PAGE PlVaf 

_, _ „ 







Notice is hereby given that in pur- 
suance of the foregoing order I will, 
as instructed therein, receivt bids 
for the sale of said franchise until 
noon Tuesday February 5th, 1921. 
All bids shall be sealed marked 
"BIDS FOR ELECTRIC LIGHT 
FRANCHISE." No bids will be re- 
ceived or considered unless the 
amount of the advertising is bid. 

Given under my hand as clerk of 
the Boone Fiscal Court this January 
4th, 1923. 

M. E. ROGERS, 
Boone Fiscal Court 



Children^ coughs 

often become dangerous when 
neglected. Give Dr. Bell's Pine- 
Tar Honey at once. It contains 
just the medicines your doctor 
prescribes to break up a cough, 
combined with the good old-time 
remedy — pine-tar honey. It loos- 
ens hard-packed phlegm, stops 
coughing and reduces inflamma- 
tion. Children love the taste. 
All druggists. Be sure to get 
the genuine. 

DR. BELL'S Pine. Tar Honey 



"Do Rats Talk to Each Other?" 
Asks Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 

"I cot 6ve cakes of Rat-Snap and threw pieces 
around feed Jtore. Got about half a diizen dead rats 
a day for two solid weeks. Suddenly, they eot fewer. 
Now we haven't any. Who told them about Rat- 
Snap." Rats dry up and leave no smell. Three 
sues; 35c, 65c, $1 2S. 

Sold and guaranteed by 

Gulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky. 



FOR SALE 

Farm of forty-seven acres on He- 
bron pike near Limaburg, Ky; good 
bouse and all necessary outbuild- 
ings; electric lights; plenty of fruit 
and water. A beautiful home. 
I. DUNSON. 
n29 R. F. D. Florence, Ky 



WASHINGTON IN POLITICAL 

FERMENT 

Congress seems to be facing sev- 
eral difficult, not to say unsavory 
situations. On top of the soldiers' 
bonus and the question of how taxes 
'shall be reduced comes another Ship- 
ping Board scandal — the secret sale 
of seven ships that cost the govern- 
ment over $30,000,000 to the Rob- 
ert. Dollar Company, of CaL, for S3, 



850,000. Then General O'Ryan, 
general counsel of the investigating 
committee in his report to the Sen- 
ate Veteran's Committee charges 
that Charles R. Forbes, as director of 
the Veterans' Bureau, was a leading 
netor in an established conspiracy to 
defraud the government. This report 
is vigorously denounced by Senator 
Reed of Pennsylvania, chairman of 
the cimmittee, and charges are 
bandied about Washington that an 
attempt is being made to apply the 
white-wash brush. Following all this 
is the controversy over Russia, led 
bp Senator Lodeg on one side, and 
Senator Borah on the other, witn 
the robabilities that Communnt 
propaganda from Moscow, and the 
organized propaganda eminating 
from a colony of old Czarist follow 
ers living in Washirgton, together 
with charger, that Ameiican money 
waa used against the Soviets to re- 
stotf tho olc ronditions, may all be 
aired. 

Political conditions at the national 
capitol on the eve of the presidential 
ejection, are in a ferment that will 
not be quieted when the railroads 
are put on the carpet, and the far- 
mers' interests reach a hearing. Ver- 
ily, the life of a represetativne is 
anything but a flowery bed of ease 
these days, for with the women's vol.. 
this year no mun tan fortell how 
long his job may last. 

Mall order pistols and home made 
"mule" aro a bad combination. 



JINNY LEE) 



t PLANTATION 
1 RECIPES 



When you finish with this newspaper 
(after yu h,iv<- tattsn your litti,- scis- 
sors and carefully cut out tin> recipe he- 
low tor grandma) you «m;i huy« a 
■'Newspaper Race..- TeU the other bovs 
and girls to jret th^ir papers too. Be 
sure the nepers are nil of the same size 
and you'd better play the game outside 
bo that if things g.t innssy nobody will 
scold. Everyone starts on a line and 
when the signal to "g>" Is given, each 
drops the paper in front of him. steps 
over it. picks it up, drops It in front 
again and keeps doing this over until 
the finish line is reaehed. The first one 
over the lit*; wins! 

Jelly Cake is Nice to Bnlu. 

Grandma makes such good jelly. 

doesn't she? You'd just love to dig 

your little silver spoon right down into 

t he jar and eat It that way. I know you 



wouln. jtiut mercy me. that isn't good 
for little girls and boys! But If grand- 
ma really wants you to enjoy her good 
jellies ask her to make some jelly cake 
for you. Just like this! 

3 eggs. 

1 cup self-rising flour. ■ 

1 cup powdered sugar. 

3 tablespoons sweet milk. 

She must sift the flour three times, 
then beat the whites and yolks of eggs 
separately and mix the sugar with the 
yolks adding. the sifted flour gradually. 
Next corne the whites of the eggs arid 
the milk. This is all mixed good and 
poured into cake tins to bake for 15 
minutes. When It is done, spread the 
layers with Jelly and sprinkle with pow- 
dered sugar. 



BANKS AND POULTRY 

* Years ago it would have been said 
that the banking business and poul- 
try raising are things having but 
litttle relation to each other. Many 
bank men would have laughed at the 
ilea, that they should promote poul- 
try raising in their vicinity. That is 
the farmer's business, not the bank- 
ers, they would have said. 

The St. Paul Farmer tells how a 
bank at Rockford, Minnesota, helped 
its community by taking steps to 
promote poultry keeping. The bank 
distributed hatching eggs to its pa- 
trons, taking om> pullet in the fall 
from each setting for payment. It 
also arranged for a pullet show anil 
worked for correct methods of poul- 
try grawlng. Their effort aroused 
great interest in this industry, and it 
must have worked for the prosper- 
ity of the community. 



f 



-S* ^v rv A A p 




Trade Where They A ll Trade 

1924 SEEDS 

Our experience in seed buying and distributing is at your service. Our rec- 
ord as distributors of quality seeds is your guarantee ot quality when you 
send your order. We do not try " " *9&te#with k*«* ^'ac}e seeds as we 
can not sell high purity and high germinating seed at prices you pay roT 
inferior seed. 

"THE BEST IS NONE TOO GOOD FOR 

THE farmer: 1 

has been our slogan and we! ha YC lived up to it. And yet our prices are 
oftimes lower than the poor grade set!?* vou * et elsewhere, A few cents 
more on a bushel of seed mean dollars more £ ™ u at h9rv ^ st Send us 
your orders or inquiries on 

Clover, Red Sapling, Alsike, Alfalfa, Japan 
White or Yellow Sweet, Ky. Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass, Timothy, Red Top. 

etch, Kentucky Lawn Grass, etc 




Kansas Kre^m Flour. 



Arcade Flour. 



^ 



WHOLESALE— •'Covington'. Largest Seed and Grocery House"- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18 20 West Seventh St. - .* 

*-. Mk 3 „a .« Covington. Kentucky, j* 



Winter's Exquisite Hats 



Everybody stayed close to the 
hduse last Sunday. 




^^Mii^t^^i^iiiii! 



You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered by 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

ot 

Erlanger, Ky. 



The rnree smart hats shown above 
are fair examples of this winter's ex- 
quisite millinery, which is superlative- 
ly riih, eluhornte, flattering. At the 
top is a turban of metallic brocade, 
with u tall cocarde of brocade at 
the front, bordered with fur. A velvet 
hat with sectional crown and scalloped 
brim, is outlined with plaited ribbon 
and ribbon forms the bow at the side 
and flowers posed at the front. A rich 
turban of shirred black velvet has a 
flare of lace across the top and two 
jewel-like pins of rhlnestone and 
onyx at the front. 






MFNTHOLCDUGM DROPS 
for nose and throat 

Give Quick Relief 



. ' ■ j 



Children 
and Older Folk 

cause manycasea of conetipation. 
flatulence, headache. niu>«, bad 
breath, fleepleaen eaa and emacia- 
tion. 
PREY'S VERMIFUGE 

*>* tafa, old-faahlaead remedy for 
Will la ON tot o»« Mventjr- 
frreyaen. 

JO eenre a »e»fc 
al root dealer* o« MBtbjr nail as | Q 
receipt el prioe. 

E. A S. FMY 

^-te&f.M-. M J 



"I Got Real Mad when I Lost My 
Setting Hen," writes Mrs. Henna, 
N.J. 

"When I eenl Into oat barn and tound my Hr«t 
Mllct >lc4(l I i «( reel mad. Onr |*kuf ul H»t- 
Snap iilleil «U !>U rata. Poultry nbn tWM uat 

^1^1*0." C'anw*iuiu« mi miilnf. No taxi) 
muWlrtt. rkmiiin rntm.Uc.SSc. 1 1 IV. 
Sold and guaiaatMd by 

1). It. Ill vlltt*. Burlington, K V 

Outlay A PeUltt, Burlington, Ky 



Vttto^w^&^t&&**nxwxwi' i 



Established 1886. 

Begin The 

NEW YEAR 

RIGHT 

Opening a bank account is the most practical 
beginning. Adding to it gives you a comfortable 
and satisfied teeling of security. It also stimulates 
your energy and insures youc future, if you con- 
tinue in the same way. This bank inyites you to 
become a depositor and 



GROW WITH IT. 



Boone Co. Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Kentucky. 



NOTICE. 



I have at my stables the good sad- 
dle bred stallion, Young Bill, 5910, 
A. S. H. R.. property of the United 
States Government. Young Bill is 
a proven aire of high -class saddle 
colts, and will make the seasou of 
1824 at the Erlanger Fair Grounds. 
Arrangements may be made for 
breeding by applying to 

J. T. RAFFERTY, Local Agt. 
Fair Grounds, Erlanger, Ky. 

9-2t Phone Erl. 185. 



Raw Fur Wanted 






W3! 



»* vT 



Trappers friend »i years. No lot 
t«Mi Urge Nuf H<-d. 

HKHHKltT KIHK 

Htir Iihk ton, Ky. 



People often think in a vague way 
that they would like to see their 
home towns go ahead, but they do 
not quite realize what an uplift and 
push ahead they would get from im- 
proved advantages. 

When a town provides better 
school facilities, for instance, tbo 
community life reflects the change. 
Better schools and teachers and cour- 
ses mean that the pupils come * out 
with brighter minds and better 
training. Not merely do they know 
more facts, but they will do better 
work in any kind of a job. That 
means that the industries of a city, 
assisted by more intelligent servic, 
can compete 1 more successfully with 
their rivals. 

They csn pay better wages, the/ 
will put more money in circulation, 
which means a higher standard of 
living, Civic improvement |a noi 

merely a vacua and duUnt M«al but 

(lie most practical method of getting 
ilu- things in life that w« all desire- 

lux free nerurttles are about the 
only Fftt thing left In this country. 



™ 



page w 



F!?renc3 Theatre 



Flore 



Ky. 



RUDOLPH VALENTINO IN 

"The Young Rajah" 

foil rciiiHin !»••!• him in Blood 
•tid Sand *.' You'll be even 
•nore thi ilii (I l>y tin's. Come 
und see 

Friday and Saturday, 



HEBRON. NORTH BEND 

Mrs. Nellie Garnett is visiting her Clifford Linely has purchased a 

m ^ U S° W - ^u „ \ »" w ^ison Victrola. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Garnett are\ Ernest Hensley has lost quite a 
.n a cnt.ca cond.t.on. \ w h wRh cn J olera . 

A^Vr^K '".f^ MrS - Ezra jMre. R. H. Crislor was shopping 

Aylor are both very ,11 ,* rincinnati Thursday. 

, Sunday school next Sunday at 2 M r. J. M. Hodges had a woodsaw 
. P. m. Church serv.ces at 2:30 p. m. | ing Saturday, Jan. 12th. 

Mrs. Luther Rouse entertained the! Mont B als!y sold his fine stock 
i| Tw H e ° P i eS M,ss,onar > T Socipt >-. hto to Tom Balsly recently. 

oJL To rh'' m Mia3 Bessie Franks ™ lled «»» Mis, 

Ovyng to the very cold weather Beatrice Muntz Sunday afternoon. 
Sunday, not a very large crow\ i) r . Crisler and Snyder Bros., dur- 



Sheriff's Sale for Taxes 



25th & 26th 

Admission. 28c CSi 10c 



Jany 



1 



"The Six-Fifty" 

Tuesday, January w9th. 



-pent Saturda 



FLORENCE. 

Chap. Snyder is the proud owner 
-.*f a Hudson coach. 

Miss Anna Carlton 
sn the. ciiy, shopping. 

Mr*-, ('has. Fulton wa> quite sic 
■» few days laal week. 

Rev. Paul Gillespie spent Sundaj 
•v,:h ("ha.s. Fulton and wit'v, 

Virgil Kelly, out on the Burlin 
v.vi pike, has whooping cough. 

Mrs. JohnH Hampton was visiting 
»p-. All 



attended communion services. 

Mrs. Jennie Conner left last week 
to spend the remainder of the wint' 
^vith her daughter in Cincinnati 
3 Mr. and Mrs. Webb McGIasson 
have had as their guest the past 
week her sister Miss Mabel Dolwick, 
f Pt. Pleasant. 

Mrs. Laura Conner is spending a 
few weeks with her daughter Mrs. 

'*<*. Goodridge, helping to nur-v 
her little grandson, who has been ill 
for several weeks. 

LOST — On road between Hebron 
and Miss Hallie Hafor's home at Bul- 
littsville, Saturday night a brown 
leather hand bag containing tnon>y 
and other articles. Finder please no- 
tify Hebron garage. 



g the cold weather, .filled their ice 
h\uses. 

Jrs. John Green and daughter, 

iss Irene, called on Frank Autras 
nd family, Sunday. 

Messrs. Valentine Utzinger and 
Wm. Bowman spent Sunday with 
Sam Barnes and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hodges had 
*« "-uests Sunday afternoon Mrs. 
Sntn Barnes and son Roy. 



list 




FRANCESVILLE. 



)tto Muntz was the guest of Ra.v 
mond Cave, Sunday. 

Miss Bessie Murray spent Sunday 
8'ith Miss Alice Eggleston. 

left Lucas, Monday night. Sj J '^fT GladyS and Jessic WUson 
Mrs. EH. Svdnor spent "one aftcr-\™ **° 8t 5 ° f Mr " and Mrs - W 

n«on last w,,k with Mrs. I..-,- Whit- | Y „. roW !l' Sun £ a >'- 
:3ain J Miss Edna Brown, of near Idle- 

! wild, spent several days the past week 
with Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Aylor and 
family 




J. 1>. Lucas has accepted a posi- 
tion in the city with a real estate 
Son. 

Mrs. Llewellet: Aylor and son spent i 
^•turday afternoon with Mrs. Walt rt* 
#uey. 

Mrs. L. E. Thompson is quite ill 
-*X her home on Shelby-st., with 
j"caema. 

Miss Hetty Utz and Miss Ada Ay- 
; J*», spent Sunday with Lloyd Aylor 
-asnd family. 

Miss Minnie Rylc and mothe; 
*pcm last Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Wood Stephens. 

Fronds of Mrs. Franklin Rome 
'PwgTM to hear of her being ill at her 
■ ite>me in Covington. 

The W. M. U. of the Baptist church 
-»ill met with Mrs. Wood Stephens 
' ^Thursday, -Ian. 24th. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Keys spent 
Saturday night and Sunday with 
-Urs. Amanda Tanner. 

Mrs. Sallic Fulton spent Friday af- 
•wrnoon with Mrs. John Swim and 
•^tre. Mallic Bee mo n. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arch Lucas and 
< daughter, Arch Marie, spent Sunday 
""with Joe Lucas and wife. 

Mr. Geo. Goodridge is getting 
Asnng very well at this writing. Mr. 
Atenzo fceemon is nursing him 
Several members of the W 



Several of the men of the commun- 
ity gave Misses Amanda Koons and 



a woodsawing one 



Sadie Rieman 
day last week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hughie McArthur, 
Jr., of Taylorsport, were guests of 
her parents. Mr. anrf Mrs. W. H. Eg- 
gleston, Saturday night and Sundav 

Rev. and Mrs. 0. J. Chastain mo- 



NONP ARIEL PARK 

Chas. Smith was on the sick 
the past week. 

Mrs. Lawrence Kenney has been 
or the sick list the past week. 

Francis Kenney and wife spent 
^the week-end with her parents at 
\Valton. 

Mrs. Stanley Conrad, of Coving- 
I tun, was the guest Monday of Mrs. 
] r has. Craven. 

Wm. Tryling of Cincinnati, wa9 
j the Sunday guest of Tom Nead and 
; wife, of Florence. 

Geo. Miller, of Price Pike, pur- 
chased two fine cows Saturday at W. 
W iWoodward's sale. 

Uncle Geo. Goodridge, who fell a 
few weeks ago, breaking his limb, is 
getting along nicely. 

Miss Gertrude Meiman, of Erlan- 
per, was the guest Sunday afternoon 
oi Mrs. Lewis Houston. 

Misses Kathryn and Jennie Lail, 
of Florence, entertained a few of 
their H"*" 1 - **---' ;y n t. 

Mrs. Stella Tryling and son Wm. 
of Cincinnati, guests Sunday of her 
parents, Joe Baxter and wife. 



church here Sunday 
evening. 



morning and 



FLICKERTOWN. 

Mrs. J. W. White has a very bud 
cold. 

Two below zero this Monday 
morning. 

The chVtaivn o! Henry Jump d) 
improve 



T . f»ichw, aw iiiiAiiT ana wire. 

££, «i UV •£ ^j 11 ^ 110 and s P e Ht Thc man y f "ends of Jack Rogers 
UrZ7t mg j"? S V, nday with M \ at Florence regret to hear of him 
f • y «ii 5 e8 u. and fam,ly - Bro * Chas " H**** *» with a CRS ° <* ^"nnps. 

• appointments at the 3 Mrs. J. G. Renaker entertained at 

dinner Friday Mrs. Lou OUiver and 
Mrs. Clem OHiver, of Covington. 

O. O. Dixon, of Richwood, spent a 
few days last week with R. II. Tan- 
ner and wife, of Burlington pike. 

Everett Wolfe and wife, of San- 
ders Drive, are rejoiced over the ar- 
rival of a fine baby boy since last 
week. 

Miss Lottie Rouse, of Gunpowder, 
spent the past week-end with her 



not 



ug. mr. ia 

rim. \ 

r\ M. U. \> 



JMaster Jim Sayres, of Cincinnati, 
* -returned home after a few days visit 
with his aunt Miss Anna Carlton. 
Lillian Coppage who was visiting 
■ lw parents during the holidays, is 
itijl ihere v/th a case of measle 
" Carl Swim has his garage 
About completed on his lot out » 
-Price pike, and will soon move into 
St, 

M*- Pi nk Neal wife and daughter 
Mrs. Marshal, moved last week into 
<*e house he purchased on the Dixie 
Highway 



Ben Hensley visited here Saturday ST>en . 
night and Sunday. \ aunt T Mrs 

Mrs. Clyde Akin is complaining V^lTcl 
considerably with lumbago 4 Bradford and 

Your scribe has been laid up thi^ 68816 Talbot have returned 
last week with a severe cold. 

Owen Utz of Newport, visited his 
>arents near here Saturday 



■arnoon and finished the.r quill Chas. Beemon and wife, Sunday 




Mise Sarah Brady, of Lawrence- 
burg, is visiting her cousin, Alice 
White. 

Roy Mullens of Newport, was a 
pleasant caller, here one dav last 
week. 

Henry Deck and J. H. Snyder de- 
livered tobacco to Pep Smith, last 
eek. 

i Ed. Botts and sister Pearl and 
Carl Alge called on Dawson Day and 
family, Sriday night. 



Notice is hereby given that I will 
on Monday, February 4th, 1924, it 
being County Court day, between 
the hours of 10 o'clock a. m., and 
3 o'clock p. m., at the court house 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., expose to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County 
and School taxes thereon, and unpa'd 
for the year 1923, and the penalty, 
interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of the 
property see Tax Commissioner's 
books for the year 192 1 at the Coun- 
ty Tax Commissioner'.-, office in th> 
Coui t House. 

B. B. HUME, 

Sheriff of Boone County. 

Amount of Tax 
Bullittivillr Precinct 

McNaufhton, Ida 265 acre* $207.47 
Constance Precinct 

Humphrey, Lewis H. town lot $16.33 
Humphrey, Mrs Ruth, town lot $3.9U 

Florence Precinct 
Gorres Alfred n. r. Lot No. 22 $4.63 
Geirach, E. H. 7 acres land $129.39 
Kramer, Jno. n. r. lot No 68 $3.61 
Meyer, L J. n. r. lot No. 124 $4.08 
Stephens, Ben Est. town lot $4.93 
Swim, Allen n. r. lot No. 21 
Reliable Lmbr. Co. lot No. 
ton-Boone 

Hamilton Precinct 
Walton, Oliver 30 acres land 
Petersburg Precinct 
Edwards, Claude'town lot 
Shinkle, Fritz 4 acres land 
Swing, Sarah Est., 12-a land 

Verona Precinct 
Hageman, Pearl n. r. 14 acres $9.43 
Napier, Chas. n. r. 10 town Iota 

$12.04 
Vallandingham, K. K. n. r. 33 acres 

land $15.41 

NOTICE 
To Delinquent Members of Breeders 
Mutual Fire and Lightning In- 
surance Company: 

Members who owe assessments ar« 
hereby notified that unless such as- 
sessments are paid within the next 
thirty days legal steps will be taken 
to collect same. By order of the Ex 
ecutive Committee. 

F. H. ROUSE, 

Secretary. 



Be-a-Hill.Customer It Pays 



NOBETTER COFFEE 

A satisfying Full-Bndied Cup that just brims with flavor and 
flagrance. Nobetter Coffee is bebter than moat 46 and 60c 
grades. Th« best and most reasonable priced coffee in the 
United States today. 

Pound 

A Trial Convinces. 

F'our or more pounds sent Parcel post prepaid. 



* 



$4.51 

7 Ken- 

$3.70 

$16 .'L' 

$15.89 
$13.06 
$24.83 



THE SEASON'S CATCH 

New Lake Herring White Fish 

Packed in various sizes for your convenience 

J 5-Lb. Pail 80c; 10-Lb. Pall *1.20; 15-Lb. Pail $1.75; 
|20Lb. Pail $2.25; 40-Lb Pail $3.99; 100-Lb. Pall $8.00. | 

Order now have them when you want them. 

Lest You Forget 

WE HAVE A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE OF 

High Grade Field Seeds 

| Write for P"^*- HILL'S SEEDS DO GROW 

[Are You Going: >o Raise Chickens? 

We are agents for the famous 

Queen incubators and Brooders 

Come in let us show you this wonderful Machine 
Or write for catalogue and prices. 



V 



MAKES DELICIOUS ROLLS, BISCUIT AND BREAD 



ou R ..GEM FLOU R 

SUB 

Northern Kentucky's } ^-"igcrocers; 



HIGH GRADE WINTER PATENT. 
2-98 Pound Bags Delivered to your 
Station for 



AND SEEDSMEN. 



EAST BEND 

Ray Kittle is visiting his sister, 
Mrs. Alma Ogden this week. 
Chas. Aylor and dausb- The river at this point is again 

> falling after a few feet rise last 
Miss Week, 
from J Mr. Robert Hodges and son Or 

naTwe ,; 8fter Vl8,tmg relatiVCS th ^\ U *' went to Walt ^ J-* Saturday 
past weeK. Q v b usines8 

^t'sumiv nfui °K R r da l^' jMr3 ' Alma °* den and M «- Katie 
Sunday with her sister, Mrs. O Hankinson spent last Thursday with 



BeA Hill Custoaer 
— It P*r* - 

/llh ! :f!!i|i!'!!;iiir[Ii!^r 





27-29 PIKE ST-eflW7»STCDV.KY 
ro ■gjPg Ojr^r — Sovnt 4SJV-4KV 







MM 








services at 



Misses Alice White and Maud Deck 

*ay afternoon wit'i her aunt. Mrs\ ,*' „ ... 

«d. Sydnor. ' ^_ M . 1S3 Ha T ze . J A $\ n > Sarah Br «dy, Au- 



Mr: John Crisweli and family, of 
•Jmon, have moved into their new 
*ome they purchased down in Non- 
S»ariel Park. 

Or. and Mrs. T. B. Castleman who 
-are in the south, write back that the*' 
TO enjoying every minute and hav- 
ig a fine time. 

Clifton Eoberts, of Cincinnati, 
=spent Saturday and Sunday with his 
i«ter, Mrs. Menter Martin and moth- 
*«r, Mrs. C. C. Robert. 

Albert Lucas has the contract to 
^4»nild for Robert Lucas a Dutch Co- 
•^aial house with seven room on 
Sbt down in Edgewood Park. 

•Little Norita Craddock, who , 
1 ^«» visiting her parents, Mr. Wood 
-Stephens and wife, is confined to 
fcfceir home with whooping cough. 

The Ladies of the Erlanger M. E. 
" ^or e h en tertained the ladies of t 
-Florence. M. E. church Wednesda, 
owning, and organized a Missionary 
-fibciety. 

•Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Sydnor, of Shel- 
JMt., laat Sunday week entertained 
-Albert Lucas and wife, L. E. Thomp- 
^■•m and wife and Jessie and Alice 
3fayre Lucas. 

^The members of the Ladies Aid of 
"ifc Hopeful church were entertained 
^» the home of Rev. and Mrs, Geo. 
-•oyer last Tuesday, down on the 
aMxie Highway. 

JMr. and Mrs. Arch Lucas enter- 
~wmed en the last church Sunday Rev 
J. H. Garber and family, of Union, 



rey and John Finn and Wilber Sny- 
der, were Sunday guests of Alice 
White. 

J. W. White and wife entertained 



P. Rouse and attended 
the Christian church. 

A number from here attended the 
W. W. Woodward sale Saturday af- 
ternoon. Everything sold well. Cows 
brought from $80 to $140. 

O. P. Rouse and wife of the Dixie 
Highway, were called to Covington, 
last week on account of the death of 
his sister, Miss Ida Rouse. 

Chas. Corbin received a card from 
Clarence Carpenter who is spending 
the winter in Florida, stating that 
it is 70 in the shade there. 

Mrs. Mamie Cahill and children 
end Mart Michels and wife, of Er- 
langer, were guests of Shelley Aylor 
and family, of Gunpowder, Sunday. 

A large crowd attended the dance 
Friday evening at Florence and a 
most enjoyable evening was spent. 
A number from Erlanger attended. 

The- Aid Society r" the Methodist 



Mrs. Cora Ogden. 

Several fanners in this vicinity 
have finished stripping tobacco and 
are having it hauled to Walton. 

he ice which still remains since 
the back water receded, now affords 
flr/e BKating for the young folks. 

Some f the young folks were en- 
tertained with a party at Dr. Carly- 
le's of Rabbit Hash one evening last 
week. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thadiie Ryle and 
littb> (laughter Wanetra, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Edward Henkinson sp?i:t 
Sunday with Mr and Mrs. Robert 
Hankinson. 



9) 

to 

0/ 

S 

s 

uV 

S 
S 



VUL CANIZ ING. 

Complete line ot Goodyear, Goodrich and Kelly- 
Springfield Tires and Tubes, good Grade of Auto- 
mobile and Tractor Oils and Greases. 

Auto AcceMorie* kept in stock. 

GEORGE PORTER, 

BURLINGTON, KY. 




— — — .--.-—...^v. ..... ....,,, j , llIC lueuiuui.i;. 

a tew friends with oyster soup and I church ivi: have an i.Jj day meeting 



cards, Saturday night, that "beine 
Mr. White's birthday 



^ Herman Bucker and family 



on 



LIMABURG 

Miss Hazel Beemon has been 
the sick list. 

Mrs. Ed. Farrell has been very 11 
the past week. 

Mrs. J. P. Brothers has been very 
the past week. 

Mrs. Leslie Sorrell spent the week 

d with father and mother. 

Robert Rouse colled on his sister 
Mrs. Hubert Beemon, last Thursday. 

Mrs. Adern Sorrelll called on Mrs! 
Lloyd Weaver Inst Tuesday CTcni 



■Ni Adei 
a vVday ni; 
try Vife. 
-J Mrs. 



irn Sorrell and wife spent Fri 
ight with Hubert Beemon and 



Mrs. Cecil 
M. I. Baker 



Mae Russ ond 
Gaines calle d on Mrs. 
one day last week. 

Miss Ethel Lee Davis and Miss 
Jessie Pettit called on Mrs. Edward 
Parrel.— When?— Ed. 

Several young people around here 
attended the donee given by Mr. and 
Mrs. Tom Dinn and family. All re- 
ported a good time. When wasthe 
dance given? — Ed. 



Wm. Utz's children have whooping 

*t "•■ v"wu, cough . 

wert Lucas and family, of N»n- Wallow o.,i« u u 

H.tfi D rS -,! "?*! bee « very sick 

have 



Rad 
-JM 



TW5NTY THOUSAND EGGS. 
m -x vn »_ ,j - «•«««». _JMiss Isabelle Rouse has 

rJJ 1 S. to ;*I re ? den ^ ° f the Boof \ ^ eBt MiM Ethel Lee Dav^s 
Cmmty Poul^y Association, has re>. Mrs. Dean is the guest < 
^ved an order from West Va., f,.- Vughter Mrs. J. P B fothers 
S£ t L t ^ U r ,d e « fs . this spring- ^Mrs. Wm. Utz cal ed on Mr, 



1100 of which are to be delivered as 
*»»on as they can be delivered. 

TloWing up Europe's hands is ono 
-ymmj of keeping its hands out of 
Vacle Sam's pockets, but not many 
*.4P*>op]e can see it that way. 



very bad colds. 



her 
her 



Sarah Brown Thursday afternoon 
Mrs. Harriet Utz has been very ill 

at the home of Wm. Utz and family. 
Wm. Utz and family had as guestr 

last Sunday Corey Utz and family, 

<>f Erlanger, Mrs. Amanda Tanner 

and Wm. Utz. 



at Mrs. Chas. Fulton's on Shelby-st., 
and all members are requested to le 
present. 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis Kenney en- 
tertained quite a number of Waltor, 
friends at their home Friday evening 
with a lovely Six o'clock dinner. K 
most enjoyable evening was spe-t 
together. 

Mrs. James C. Layne of the Dixie 
Highway, and Miss Sallie Ford, of 
Carrollton, have returned home from 
a trip to Washington, D. C, where 
they attended the National Illiteracy 
Conference. 

Renaker and wife, MissTSva 
RenaKer and Paul Renaker motored 
down to Covington Saturday even- 
ing nr.ri tjken supper with Mr. and 
l.rs Lou Olliver, and all attended 
the theater in Cincinnati. 

This community was shocked last 
week to hear of the death of Phil 
Lambert of Hyde Park, Cincinnati. 
He formerly lived in Florence whe*-e 
he was engaged in the blacksmith 
business. His funeral was held Mon- 
day Jan. 21 at Mary's church at 9 
a. m., and was laid to rest in Mothet 
of God cemetery at Latonia. He 
leaves a wife, one daughter and two 
sons to mourn his death. The family 
have the sympathy of this commun- 
ity. 

The many friends here regret to 
hear of the death of Miss Ida 
Rouse, of Covington. Her death oc- 
curred at the home of her sister, 
Mrs. C. R. Tanner, of Covington, on 
Jan. 16th. ihe was 67 years olfl. 
The funeral was held Saturday morn- 
ing at the Methodist church by Rev. 
Gillespie. The family have the sym- 
pathy of this community In this their 
hour of sorrow. She was laid to rest 
in Florence cemetery. One by one we 
cross thc silent river to the other 
shore where loved ones will meet in 
one by one. 



(Too Late for Last Week.) 

Mr. Hubert Ryle lost a valuable 
milch cow one day last week. 

Mr. J. H. Walton, entertained Rev. 
J. F. Hawkins Saturday night. 

Miss Mary Hodges called on Miss 
Sheryl Ryle last Sunday afternoon. 

Johnnie Acra united with the East 
Bend Baptist church Sunday even- 
ing. 

Miss Blanche Hodges' little daugh- 
ter burned her arm severely a few 
days ago. 

Messrs. Everett Ryle and Ora Og- 
den made a business trip to Walton 
last Saturday. 

The river is receding slowly after 
the rather high stage which it reach 
ed a few days ago. 

Rev. J. F. Hawkins, pastor of Ea*t 
Ben d Baptist churc h, preached here 
Sunday morning and evening. 

The Ohio river boats have been 
running very irregular of late, or. 
account of high water and fog. 

Quite a large crowd attended the 
funeral of Mr. J. J, -Stephens last 
Friday at the K. of P. Hall at Rabbit 
Hash. 

Dr. Kenneth Ryle has been kept 
quite busy in this neighborhood the 
past week as it seems there is much 
sickness in livestock of late. 

Messrs. Ezra Aylor, Robert Aylor 
and Everett Ryle each shipped a 
bunch of porkers to Cincinnati mar- 
ket on the boat Monday morning. 

The Rabbit Hash telephone switch 
board has been removed to Mr. R. T. 
Stephens' house where Mr. Herman 
Ryle and wife will keep it the com- 
ing year. 

Several of the pupils who attend 
school at Hamilton, missed the en- 
school missed the entire week last 
week because of the high water, 
which could not be forded. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ora Ogden and 
family entertained Rev. Hawkins, 
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hodges and 
daughter Miss Mary, Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward Hankinson, Mr. John Acra 
and Master Orville Hodges last Sun- 
day. 



Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Jan. 26th 

HARRY MOREY and MARY ASTOR IN 



(( 



I 

ALL STAR COMEDY: 

"THE FIDDLING FOOL" 

FEATURINO CHARLEY MURRAY 

n 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 

Friday Night, Jan. 25th 

CHILDREN 10c. :-: ADULTS 25c 
War Tax Included Will Begin promptly at 7>30 



99 



-GREAT^ 

eduction Sale 

NOT A MAKE BELIEVE BUT AN HONEST 
TO GOODNESS SALE. PRICES REDUC- 
ED ON ALL 

SUITS AND OVERCOATS 

Maokinaws, Coat Sweaters, Pullovers, Knee 
Panto and Corduroy Goods. 

II you are in need of clothing take advantage of the bar- 
gains we are offering in this sale. 



Selmar Wachs 

605 Madison Avenue, COV INGTON, KY. 









^ 



BOONE HOUN 



REMOUNTS FOR THE UNITED STATES ARMY 

More Than Twenty-Two Thousand Mares Bred To 

Thoroughbred Stallions By The Federal Remount 

Service. The Kentucky Stallions Are L. Great 

Demand On The Government Breeding Farms. 



The American Remount 
eoclatlw is each day growing 
usefulness and popularity. It j§ ren- 
dering an unselfish and invaluable 
service to the "'„. L>epsrfjnr„ by 
making It possible fV»r the ravairy 
branch of the Army to have the b«s: 
remouws In *z «?£*». Hundreds of 
turfmen, all the racing associations, 
the United state* Government and 
many private cltiaens have contrib- 
uted to the fund for the purchase of 
thoroughbred stallions to be placed on 
the government farms throughout the 
country,, there to be bred to suitable 
cold-blooded mar«s, the produce to be 
turned over to the canrlry division of 
the United States Army. Long ex- 
perimentation has . shown that the 
thoroughbred stallion so 



As- purposes and tasks In conae.-Mon with 
commercial and agrarian activities 
where great bulk is not an essential. 
It was fortunate that raring was on 
« govt! ' adatlon when the Remount 
Service came into being. At the In- 
cept:...; of the ~»vement turf author- 
ities gave substantia! assistance to the 
project. StaHlooa were needed badly 
Some were given by the Jockev Club 
Others were the gift of individuals 
connected with the turf or in sym- 
pathy with Uie work. The rest were 
purchased by the Remount Service, 
and were^eharge agaltwt tiie appro- 
priation of 1250,000 with which the 
plan a as launched. 

The reduction of the government 
appropriation to $150,000. which went 
mated will} Into effect a few years ago when 
get in size, speed, quality and coinage 'genera! policy of economy struck the 



the ideal mount for the wear and tear 
of the cavalry. 

The Federal Remount Service, with 
a record of more than 22,000 mares 



various service bureaus, checked the 
growth of the movement for a time. 
Those In charge of the service faced 
the situation courageously, however. 



!.T« OH", J." 6 . in f u « urut,on " f tt'ejThey sough, the ^operation of breed- 



alan, and 380 stallions ready for dis- 
tribution In 'various stales of the 
Union next spring, lias a rlghl to the 
gratitude of everybody Interested in 
the improvement of the general pur- 
pose horse. 

When this organi/.ution ot:...? into 
being after the close of the World 
War, fears were expressed In some 
quarters that It would meet with ho* 
tllit.v on the part of breeders of heavy 
draft horses, over 90% of the stal- 
lions distributed by the remount au- 
thorities being thoroughbred; but the 
contrary has turned out to be the 
case. Breeders of Fercheron, Shire, 
Clydesdale and other heavy horse 
types have gone out of their way to 
anew their friendliness to a cause that 
is uot only providing a safeguard by 
mean* of an augmented supply of 
light horses available for national de- 
fense, but is furnish las millions of 
animals of a type needed for riding 



era, fanciers and horse enthusiasts In 
general io keep the work going. To- 
day the project has reached a point 
where theie'would be u public protest 

If any attempt was made to < I k its 

growth, thinners and breeders hither- 
to ignorant of Uie benefits of using 
the thorou ghbre d as a top cross have 
been quick to note the improvement 
in the quality of the foals from cold- 
blooded mures. The mongrel stallion 
haa been displaced, and the scrub 
horse should be an unknown product 
in every part of the country In an- 
other ten years if there | s no 
interference with the program 
laid out by the Federal Remount 
Service. 

The Kentucky thoroughbred is the 
moat important factor in ihis enter- 
prise, as at least SO per cent of the 
stallions securer! by the Remount Ser- 
vice were bred in this state. 



THE WEATHER 

.Nothing is more cussed and dis- 
cussed thun the weather. 

It requires a sudden change l-i 
temperature, like the recent cold 
wave that swept over the entire coun- 
try, to call attention anew to its 
importance in the daily life of every 
indifidual. ■* 

To quote from the poet 

"For whether it blow or whether it 
snow. 

We must have weather, whether ;r 
no." 

It's a time honored jest that when 
all other subjects of conversation 
fail, we may turn to the weather. 
Whether hot or cold, it assumes first 
place in more conversations than any 
other one subject. 

We may be interested in our ev- 
eryday tasks, the latest movie, tax 
reduction, politics, or whatnot, but 
let an overnight change in the 
weather come, we rush to the ther- 
mometer^ to 'see what the mercurv 
shows. 

ley blasts freeze the marrow of the 
bone and the sun's hot rays brine; 
human fraility to the melting point. 

The ability of the body to resist 
extremes of hot or cold is the thing 
that really counts, but the humrn 
being is only vaguely aware of that 
fact, because he believes that hi; 
comfort depends largely upon what 
the thermometer shows. 

This age-old superstition is no 
more the evidence of the frailty of 
human nature than the one that tK 
seasons are changing. 

How often have we heard that' 
'. '"^-Kcnr, scientist, evidently 




PAGE 



I 



ACUTE GOUT 

Gout is one of the oldest ills to 
wkich flesh is heir. The classical lit- 
erature of Rome is full of allusions 
-to- "podagra;" many of the writers 
refer, with feeling to their personal 
sufferings. Moreover, the mouldering 
skeletons of Egyptians of the predv- 
nastic period .'how signs of gout in 
the ii itu r. In modern times the Eng- 
lish who ure the successors and heirs 
of the Romans, are of all people the 
•oat subject to the "scourge of the 
aaktocra; •y." In America we see les* 
*<f it; yet it is by no means uncom- 
■&•», and many phyicians believe 
abat it is increasing in frequency. 
Me suffer more often than women 
fr»« typical acute attacks of gout, 
bat women are by no means immune 
i© she more chronic forms, as is 
sfeawn in the crippling of some of 
tec joints and in the deposits of 
chalky nodes in the finger joints. 

A typical attack of gout begins 
with a sudden severe pain in the 
great toe that comes on in the early 
morning and weakens the victim. It 
is not, however, a clap out of a clear 
sky; for some days there are almoH 
always premonitory symptoms sucn 
as indigestion, shooting pains in var- 
ious parts of the body, headache, a 
little fever and a villainous temper. 
The affected joint isred, swollen and 
exquisitely tender. During the da'. 



HAVING GRADUATED 

FROM THE 
RAHE AUTO & ""TRAC- 
TOR SCHOOL 
Cincinnati, ^ 
I AM NOW 
AT WOODWARDS 
GARAGE AT DEVON. 
PREPARED 
TO DO 
FIRST-CLASS WORK 



iookinjr for publicity, averred that Ly 
reason of the Japanese earthquake 
the earth's position with relation Jo 
the sUn had been changed so that the 
Lnited States was f,00 miles nearer 
the sun. 

His theory held out until a kind 
providence in the form of a col i 
wave pushed it into an untimely 
g'ave. 

i.very few years the fishing worms 
lake ,. winter outing above the 
ground and the fruit trees obliging- 
v L-.oom for Christmas, but consult 
the weather records any place and t 
will ho leund that temperatures av- 
erage up about the same, in cvcles of 
>( ars 

The weather is rtoi sucn 
f-l«l tool ns m^st ol 



Let Beatrice help you produce more Cream 
Get a Pure-bred Bull Absolutely Free. 

17 Pure-bred 
Bulls 

will be given Free 

To the Boy and Girl Members of the 

Beatrice Junior Helpers Society 

Double the profits of the Cream you sell 
by getting 

BEATRICE BIGGER CREAM CHECKS 

and 

BEATRICE PATRONS GIFT CERTIFICATES 

Your continued patronage brings Beatrice 
Gift Certificates exchangable for the prizes 
shown in the Beatrice Ca'.~L- ^.. Z.fts. 

Begin marketing your cream profitably. 
Ship your next can of cream to 

BEATRICE. 

Write for particular* 

The Beatrice Creamery Co. 



WOOD F. AXTON IS MADE 

MEMBER OF BURLEY POOtV 

Louisville Manufacturer, Who R«^ 

cently Bought Farm, Declare* 

He Doe* Not Want To Pna 

fit From Self-Denial 

and Sacrifice Of 

Hi* Fellow*. 



W« 



I 



IM "M I c>M A I I I . 



943 949 Carr St 



Uh 



a f'u-k e 
imagine. 




THE KINDLY WOMAN 

If only a woman could be made 
to believe that one of the surest pass- 
ports to success is kindness, she 
would find her way through life 
smoothing out astonishingly. It al 



the pain is quite bearable, but toward Ways pays '. and . St alwa . vs is a pass- 



port that lies right in her own ha . i 
and may be had a wee bit oftrouble, 
r.n inlinitsimal amount of repression. 
It will do so much for a woman, get 
her so any favors and make her 
pathway so much easier and more 
pleasant that from a very selfish 
viewpoint, if no other, a woman 
would do well to adopt a platform of 
kindness. 



There 



are jracious 
count - their friends 



women who 



evening its intensity increases, and 
the night is one long torment. The 
attack lasts a variable period, per- 
haps a week, perhaps two or three 
weeks. It subsides gradually, anJ 
after it has gone the patient often 
feel unusually well for a time and, 
forgetting the past, is tempted to in- 
dulge himself again in the pleasures 
of the table. The disease is not al 
ways confined to one great toe; both 

may be attacked, and so may the count their friends by the score 
thumbs or other digits. friends won by the power of kind- 

The treatment of gout during an ntas ' There are cross rained cre- 
attuck is not very successful; the ' t0 - le «» who lewjil their friendless 
most that can be done is to mitigate condit "»n when all the time the trou- 
-the pain by local applications of cam- tU * is of ih * ir "wn making— 
phor liniment or other liniments or Moet of "* kn °w saleswomen who 
soothing ointment!. During the at- act tow ard customers in such an ov- 
tack a milk diet modified perhaps "bearing and insolent manner that 
with an occasional egg or with rice the exa sperated purchaser shakes the 
is advisable. During convelescence du8t oi tne establishment ok her 
toe patient niudt learn tc practice 8noes and never returns, 
moderation in eatirg and drinking ^ **"* other hand there are sales 
and tc take up a new node of life WOD >en who hold their customers 
with long hours rf ruep, plenty of year after y* 5 * 1 " through quiet court 
exer. <*e in th; .ptn air .rrd freedom esy and endeavor t0 ^^ The pfo _ 
trom worry. Remarks on general and fetors know these saleswomen, ani 
medicinal treatment wih be consid other Proprietors come to know of 
+*•* in • lat^r article. th eoi — therefore there is always a 

— — . Place and always a little better sa!- 

■orty-five family cows were pur- ar > offered. 
chased by or let for their feed last fashionable women should not be 
year to negro farmers in Payette expected to be any more kindly tha I 
County, Tenn., who had previously their humbler sisters, but all women 
had none on their farms, thru the ou * ht to be expected to be kind jus' 
efforts of the negro extension agent to mak * life Worth living and to oil 
m the county. A purebred dairy bull the wheels of things. 

hn» JV°K PU ^l br6d C0WS ^ ye been U * iU mak « tf »i"«s so much more 
bought by oti,. r nerro farmers in the pleasant, and will bring friend- and 

l, OU ,? ty . •f c ?«"»jr ^ reports to all that makes life worth ivTng U„ 



THE BOK PEACE AWARD 

It is a foregone conclusion, that 
Uie Kok peace plan essay will re- 
ceiva a favorable majority in the re- 
ferendum that is being conducted 
through the press and the magazines 

I he stage is all set for it. All al- 
truistic people who hope to end wa • 
by some means or other will vote for 
it, regardless of whether thev are 
prepared fr an intelligent vote on 
the question through reading and a 
thorough study of the problems that 
stand in the way of international 
peace. 

But a referendum in many re- 
spects is like an election, only less 
convincing, because those who are in- 
terested vote for the project undo- 
discussion, some of those opposed 
are strong enough in their opposition I 
to take the trouble to vote and a 
large disinterested per cent fail tJ 
take any side. 

Those who have studied the win- 
ning plan in the Bok peace award say ' 
that it is a rehash of peace propos- 
als heretofore made, with the sinele- 
exception of one new thought— that 
the manufacture and sale of arms 
be limited during times of peace 

Word comes from Washington that 
the senate, which is clothed by the 
constitution with authority to .make 
peace, will not officially revognite 
the winning plan. 

Perhaps this is as it should be. 
lhe farmers of the constitution hud 
the good judgment and foresight to 

t*?!'? th& } \ he COmmon P*°Ple. by 
: and disposition, were 




Lexington, Ky., Jan. 20.- 
F. Axton, Louisville tobacco i u*- 
facturer, has joined the Burley TW 
bacco Growers' Co-operative Assoc- 
iation, sifjntr.< a rontact pledging tt*** 
tobacco from his farm in Oldhaa* 
county, Kentucky, to be markets* 
through the asso ciation, 

Mi. Axton has been from the v.eryr 
I seat a h eHev e r in e o-o pe rativ t mar^- 
jkn':.-i : r of Burley tobacco. He endors- 
ed the movema n: i . ; , public ad- 
Areas at a meeting of growers dol- 
ing the organization campaign andt 
has been one of the manufacturer* 
who bought their rr»qnh-rmerrts froTfc 
the association from the wry be- 
ginning of its business lir' . 

In a letter to P r es ident ami (i<-n- 
eral Manager James <". Stone. 
Axton says he has owned the. .,,, 
for only two months, hut thai ki 
sires to join the association \ki . 
a crop of tobacco w planted •» **' 
land, J"' 1 

Mr. Axton, in his letter teirjAen 
Mr. Ston" to «end him a omtr J »->i- 
•ays he could u?e the ;JnaVr 
Uh1 grow in the manufactU'i 
own brands, "f>ut in these daj( 

uth« t men v ho a R&agB 

ig sr trying to make be 
for I h ; • ; i • 
can better 

daughters an<£ 
j na\ i- some 
| as a result 

'do not want to pro fit by this at their- 
j expense, and I realize that the mo*--* 
l profit there is in farming the mor-jf 
land in Kentucky will be worth an*f 
| that when men receive a decent Ii*. 
I ing wage for their labor, whether oq 
farm, in the mine or factories, th«- 
eommunity * bound to pros- 



! Rign 



dftio 

thci 



erra- 



■f the enjoyments of rfif*- 
<>f their toil, I certainly 



PENCILS 

Pencils make marks. Some 
light marks and some make 
marks. The harder you press, 
Wf?eker -Hre mark; 



WHY IS IT THAT TRUCK DRIV- 
-JERS SOMETIMES DO THESE 
THINGS? 



John T. 



Axton's letter to President 
in full follows: 

Luuksvillf, Ky. 
-fcumary 1 0th, lt»24. — 
•Mr. James ('. Stone, President 

Buries Tobacco Cooperative M^.r- 
ket'iiig Association, 
i Lexington, Ky. 
s Dear Jim ; 



maw 

blacri 

the j ... 

j L)r>ve. a.t maximum tr„ck speed w,-i 

Nolan, f ,rr.„ r .national \^ tt at ^ m ^ to ««;P suddenly on a 

cpnimandor of the National Disabled » h PP er y averoeat? 

Soldiers League, now realizes this] m , er * nlc i;a8e ot ew«f"» with 

fact, though he probably didn't real- : ? >umcit ' nt amount of oil and nv£- 

IZfi it when he engineered his first j t^ lubricate other parts of the 

ptncil campaign. ; auto. 

The district attorney's office ofl N ^ Iect to k *-en the radiator lilk-i ; " iUCU > l '-°: ?«» v e Association, 1 
New York county, New York, is tr . I « a good • clt ' an water al ail *&&• > V "". *?* V " U l " 8end i! '° a contr act so 
intr to find out where the ' money ' N( '*' rlt ' ct to investigate any nntn 

*wt The pencil-selling campaign oil SOund which ,uay deve *0P on the] Av President of the Axton-Fi.sh.-r 
the League took thousands of dol aU ^° uh(n Rfft heard? j Tobucco Company, 1 would alwaj 

lars from the public pocket. The dip- '' . ! to examine tn e auto occaaio 

trict attorney suspects that N'ola , i aJly , f 0r loost ' nutii and bolts'' 'could use this tobaceo in the mana- 

knows what became of it hence the l t0 hoed tht " first Sl iueak t .f j failure of CLOWN CIGARETTKJi 

investigau. i.. ' j un, V that art ' tailing for oil? | a "d OLD HILL SIDB smoking to- 

Pencil-selling was the cause of ™^*e* to retard the spark whe-i J baocu apd "ther braiwks, hut in thes« 
Nolan's downfall in the first plac- startmR the engine and advance i ! »y»i v 'hen other men who are err- 
and it may he again. His mark was ' W » runn ing on the road. , l»ged in farming and trying to mak* 
too Hack, judging from late devt-i- ..,, ace the ''"^'"e "ben standi. n, ' better marketing conditions for the-> 
opnui t . | 

He wi 



Referring to my last interview whK 
you regarding putting the tobactt* 
raised on my farm in the Burle- ?.,, 
bacco Co-o; Sttive Association, 

. -ii< 
that I- Stay sign same. 

A* Prt aident of the 
; Tobacco Company, I would 
have a market for my tobacco, as w*. 



still? 
Let the 



I products, so that they can better ed- 
ousted as national com- I , . ^ ei uu ' engine labor up a steep |«*ate their sons and daughters a»«l 
nianoe: c { the oi«aniznti n last Jun - ! Wlth out droppng to a lower «va •>•*« s i>"H' of the enjoyments of Life 
because he insisted on ."nginK ;j I v AcCl |b-rate engine too quicky, aim ' a< lh *' result of their toil, I certainlv 
pencils as a method of 
i v. The ,-ink and fil- oLiecto d . 



reported 

eagiif's i 



not 

in the important 

questions of international relations 



learned enough 

questions of in 

to decide them inteUiVentiy.* SoTh'ey 

delegated to the chief exoenti™ ,..,.. 



Oeorge T. Duris, «.f Indianapolis 
was elected successor to Nolan, hut 
tit tornier commander is 
no in iK'Sicssion of the 
A ■■■' H ii Washington ye*." 

Nolan had Thomas V. Fields, n i 
tioral vice- commander, arrested i., 
Boston on a charge of acciepting •, 
fee of $5.00 from a disabled vetcr- 
an t.j bundle his case of compensa- 
tion. Fiel.-is didst l.ke it and no*' 
hes te.ii'.j' ^e ^<- .eminent autho;- 
Hits what he knows of Nolan and the 
Lertgi'c. 

u •»'*•>* inait i; teresanp; reaidi; •■ 
sc me J -v. 



:aising mon- ,'' Ve the auto -* ump J,nd the engim O0 ,u,t «nt to profit bv this at ttW 
i::ock? cxpeu.se, and I realise that the is^. 



ol 



Shift from high to second or 
with auto running at a high rate 

speed? 

Shift into reverse gear, with auto 
I running in a forward {direction. 
' Fail to release clutch before shii- 
flr.g gei.rs? 

I Release the clutch with the gaso- 
J line throttle fully advanced? 

Allow auto to stand in a puddlo 
of oil or water for any length of 



UnlUd States Department of Agri- 
culture, and 18 purebred calves are 
being raised for dairy purposes. Kf- 
fort haa bean made to provide bet- 
ter pastures. As . result, pastures 
have been increased 120 acres and 
many of the old pastures have be.„ 
improved. 

Alaska haa bean found to have 
tich dapoaits »t almost ^ tt y o^tul 
mineral. 



kindness is aways repelling, 
there m . Vt . r y « t was anybody who 
was won by an ugly demeanor, nor a 
"nippy manner, nor a grouch that 
nevtr wore off. 



ttciantista ui i»i. convention o«' the 
\imn,.,ri AK..oi,tion for the Ad- 
vaocaauwt of Scianct -aid that ih< 
mmainf link might be found •( any 
'""' **'" "ovr hav, a mw4 From 
*' Bryan vn tlw .ubjact 



- chief executive and 
th ^ "«"e delibt'futive branch of the 
congress the authority to determi (l - 
our policy toward other nations 

-No one can deny that an effort is 
not ^ being made to find a practic-.l 
Plan for ending war, which the j«. . 
Pie generally will accept. Many dis- 
agree on plans that have alreau-- 
been proposed and many believe that 
J*e Lnited States should enter th • 
league of Nations, but nothing hais 
been found yet that this country 
ponsor, which is free from entang' 
Ung fore»gn relations, such as on- 

!££? of thc u>aKue of Nation « 

nl^'*^/ 1 "* n ° W three outstaiidln« 
Pho. before the present session of. 

iu°£r m the forn, * f »-* — 

One of them provides for the out- 
lawing f war and an internati 

2 r w r 1 T' nt m such }udki * 1 <**>•«* 

ter as 'would not shackle the inde- 
pendence or impair the sovereignty 
of any nation." ' 

^Another would amend the const' 
of 21 «• Provide for a referendum 
of the voters on the question of « lit . 
claration of war. 

Still another calls f or u eoMttttt. 
t'orul amendment providing for the 
Conscription of money, imh.strv nnd 
Property t s well as men In M w of 
War, 

[•Wi constant seeking fo, „ way to 
«-'<d war indicates 
to find tht road 



STERN REALITY 



profit there is in farming, the more.. 

the la.'id in Kentucky will be wort'i t 

and that when men rwceive a decent 

living wage for their labor, whether 

• on a farm, in the miae, or factories. 

|the «i,o!e community is bound to. 

: , '>-< | . If would be useless f. jr 
ti:e to assure you of my conlidence- 
In the management of your associ.-. 

j tion, as I have known you and B4>_ 
Barker many years and know how 



an honest effort 
to peace and wk» 
«*>• that it may luit b ,. Mt (|U , r 



Crude oil production Liuk 
cuidi U»t >r« 
did *u well, ho« 



Dr. Daniel T. MacDougal. director 
of _ botanical reseatvh at the Carnegie 
institute, Wash i ngton, akes a start j 
ling prediction which appeals strong- 
ly to us. 

He is of the opinion as the result ' 
of experiments, that the time J 
coming when mankind will receive 
its sustenance direct from the rays 
of the sun instead of consuming daily 
lood in the manner of today. 

As the food we eat represent* only 
the stored up energy of the sun, l»r 
MacTougal proposes the creation of 
an artificial cell in the human body- 
that will receive this nourishment 
direct from the sun, instead of thru 
animal and plant life as at present 

When we read the doctor's predic- 
tion in the daily press our n -st 
thought was to have « n artificial cell 
installed in oi r own noble body and 
.hat of our family and then ' rush 
nghi o,1 to some dime of perpetual 
sun, when- we i ould gor^e to re 
I'Mion without doing acother stroke 
of work. 

And then the thud ot* reality! 

with uch .i revolution 
John ii. Henry, and the 
lionaires 



time, while perfectly aware that it is - vou have always conducted your owre 
very harmful to the tires? I b uain ese , and my dealings with th-- 

Apply brakes suddenly when it j, I Burley Tobace Co-operative Market 
not at all necessary? | ii»K Association has ben a eassurance 

Neglect to keep brakes property I of th «" same honorable plan you hav* 
adjusted and in serviceable condi- ; a l w «y s followed, 
tion at all times? This farm is located in QMhn W . 



Neglect to 
bearings every 



TubricaTe 
200 



ate toot brake i county, near Skylight, and contain. 

mik " s - I ' ,1,5 acres, and while I have only hat 

thfr feTJH for t-o months, yet I wa-it 



r as. 
e a 



ot your organization, I r> - 
Sincerely Yours; 
WOOD F. AXTON. 



.i 
ei.i v 

would promptly "corn 

the sail and dole 

Steering prices 

No. there'. 
VN e'll ju^i hit'. <■ 
"■'Mile old gl nui 



possible. 

-Iher oil 
.'I 

' It* ra>s out at pr 



GIVE HER A GOOD KITCHEN ; to join our organization before "any/ 
People who investigate the setn- j to b«cco is grown on it by me 
imenrs of ceuiilry town and rural' Thanking you in advance for 
women, find m many cases that they j cepting this application to becom 
have become sick of country life i j ' member 
the result of the hard work they en- ' "»»in 
counter. They look with envy at 
their city cousins, not so much on ' 
account of the supposed glitter and !*RFn fkA^C i!r,„r 
fascination of city life, but because U^kU UKUOO IMl Wo. 

the city women have more conver I 

-cnt facilities for doing housework. This year's enrolment in Boon* 

A thoughtful arrangement of a ! cou »ty «» almost that of last vears- 
kitchen, with planning to save un • f Jt i * : 
necessary steps, and adding of small ' Beaver Lick 3. 

Big Bone I. 

Burlington N. / 

Florence 15. 

Grant J. 

Hebron -22. 

Petersburg .: 

I't. PJeaaant l. 

Rich wood 4. 

Union i.». 

Verona -• 

Walton o. 

With the Nat on.,1 Noli c«i| nm*% 

a tu.»» of li.il6,7WH 



conveniences, will do much for th • , 
euuntrys women's life without mttth ' 
expense. One of the most import™ t ' 
problems that the country man has' 
to solve, is to make conditions eaaio 
for his wife. 



(•n 



SCHOOL CLOSED 
account of so much Afckoeu 
WnonK the children, the .school,bom K 
tiuight by Miss Llitir Kvle at to- , .- 
(.rove, has been dosed for th nex* ! 
two weeks. 



still incomph t. 

is tabulated. 



'!" lio|>e of escape 
to piuK ak>n« «t jh 



a all i«. 
Ih» •!»«• ciu.l 



'»» er. 



JAMKS 

lantei r 

illed Hi 



f WALLER, DEAD* 
Wall... a K ed To x< ais, 
un m 



Walton 
•Uy. hm nth, ifwi a lon« ,u Dt .« 
»e n iwrvived t.x , +x4»* aid thre* 

daughn i 



Tabulation ui the Tax Comn 

f ' <• at Ira^kfon, «.d 

' »*lW» Io, the State 'in iV'". 

n-.of i2,«D6,uu,s:a lhl totair^ 
•ime reeeived bv the Sut. d< 
1 t.t.ud ^T.KU.-l'Jo.^'.i. 

'< aiwhilect »* M t|„. \\ iltit . Ht ^ tc 
"< unaaf., but plenty >(l ua » 1>U ui u v, 
a vha 

v^ali 



I wit in 

doptod 



tn»frka in the iwoltitiont. 

fc| the firM Pan Amerie^a 
Kee t i,, ., Couf«ren*« at ltuewaH. 
Aiivh, pbo Wa > ,„. itml |aj|, tw | 

orirn rasa t ton of i M iH*.r 



in lava 

Auoiiliarta- 
aad ,,u>, ^.hved c^^apo^^ "J 

the pra^ of work xtreaat-d 



riilka wrw can't 

•*U»m« u Um* foe four tioree »avuUy.'t b, taUi 

>t i-mOd bo Urn* 



W«r r+*ee m t 



iL^m'^i/^i ;&$Vs£ 



rifirtiitrliWiiBIIBliM iTH 



-&& jissLvsii &z^^^&&^i&$%lkm 



■* 



a^s^a^a^a^a^a^a^M^ 



*kb* t.aHi 



~aw*M*rr.-' v.i iit ae^ 



BOONE 



COUNTY RECORDER 



THE SERVICE OF THE COUNTRY 
TOWNS 
Country towns have .'i rtiflfareH 
outlook on problems of conduct and 
character than the cities do, anil the 
mural standards of the av< pajp coun- 
try town arc higher than tho - >i 

the average city. 

People sometimes complain of the 
spirit of personal criticism and 
. watchfulness that prevails in coun- 
try towns. If a young an goes 
wrong, he is the target for general 
complaint. He may think he wouM 
like it better if he were living iti 
some city where his lapses of con- 
duct would pass unnoticed in tho 
crowd. 

But really it is a godsend to him 
that he is living in a place that sets 
&. certain standard of conduct fc 
his life. This is a help to every 
well meaning fellow. It makes him 
feel that he has inherited a certain 
tradition of conduct, and that he 
must be loyal to it. The result is 
that he avoids many of the meaner 
vices, which may seem enticing for 
the moment, hut which bring misery 
in their train and lead to broken 
homes and ruined lives. Many peo- 
p+t- w4w*o l ives have ben wrecked— by- 
dissipations in city surroundings, hk- 
terly regret that they had not re- 
JHl>uLned in the country town where 
5f r «i came from, where helpful : n- 
nwon *es "' friends and neighbeis 
Ao>n. churches would have kept them 

J. ight. 
-^ioij.'he country people have mot' 
SteW'' lo r( -' a< ' good books and get in- 
Jrested in the real ends of life, an I 
Siafey are not so much diverted m*<> 
J|i 'Uricd pursuits. 

The consequence of these cond-- 

■■a*-* 't'-s is, that when any moral issue 

-^•arises, the country towns are apt tj 

^ be the strong character force that 

holds the nation back from some de- 

hnquency. 

It will be a sad day for the nation 
if ever the country towns should de- 
cline to the point where they would 
be unable to exert a restraining in 
fuence over the follies of the cities. 



WARREN HUGH WILSON 

TO ADTRESS CONFERENCE 

The main feature of Rural Com- 
munity Day program at Farm arvi 
Home Convention Week of the Ken- 
tucky College of Agriculture will be 
an r.ddress anu uiscussion led by Dr. 
Warren Hugh Wilson, Superintend 
ent, Department of Church and 
Country Life, Board of Home Mis- 
sions Professor of education, Colum- 
bia University, President of the In- 
ternational Missionary Agricultural 
Association, and author 0/ "The: 
Church of the Open Country," "The | 
Evolution of the Country Commun- 
ity." "The Church at the Center," 
nnd "The Second Missionary Adven- 
ture." Dr. Wilson stands out pre- 
eminently as a leader in rural church 
and community activities in America 
and abroad, and his lectures promise 
to be a source of inspiration to thos° 
™ho attend 4JW conference. 

In addition addresses will be de- 
livered by Mrs. R. E. Tipton, Presi- 
dent of the Fayette County Commun- 
ityCouncil, who will speak on "What 
Community Organization Can Do for 
the County;" while Dr. John Cham- 
bers will present "A County Health 
Program," and Mrs. Frances Miner, 
recreation expert of the Civic Lea- 
gue will speak on "Recreation for 
the Community." In' her address, 
"The Challenge of the Community to 
the Home," Miss Mary E. Sweeney, 
of the Kentucky College of Agricul- 
ture, will point out the importance 
of making life a training in health 
and citizenship and those high ideals 
and standards of living which will 
encourage and that life by which 
alone the true satisfaction of the 
country may be attained. 



TAXREDUCTION 

Congress is very much divided on 
the subject of Secretary Mellon 's tax 
reduction scheme. 

That, however, is nothing new for 
congress. That august body is made 
up of many people of many minds, 
from sections of the country, repre- 
senting constituents of widely diver- 
gent views and interests. 



The menm 




1 , . 1 •_.,, w . - 1 II XT a ;...|>i'i <. moo ) 

A h««* on the fnr horizon. 

An mltnite tender sky, 
The ripe rich tints of the cornfield, 

And the wild gee»« sailing; hiffh,; 
And all over lowland and upland 

The blaze of the goldenrod; 
Some of us call It Nature, 

And some of us call It — God. 

—William Carruth. 

THINGS WE ALL LIKE 

A salad is always In season and a 
new one Is always welcomed. 

Carlton Salad.— 
Separate Freccb 
endive, clean, 
dr^ln, an A chill. 
Cut cold cooked 
beets Into slices, 
then Into rings 
and fancy shapes. 
Arrange pieces ol 
endive through the best rings ; arrange 
on crisp lettuce allowing two rings 
and five shapes to each portion. Serve 
with French dressing nnd sprinkle each 
with chopped walnut meats. 

Apple Salad. — Apples are so good 
and of such unoil flavor at this season 
that apple salad should be served oft- 
en. Take two cUpfulS of diced apple, 
a small sliee of finely mineeil Spanish 
onion, n half-cupful of finely diced' 
(lutes and eeasoa well with n good rich 
hoiieii dressing. Serve on lettuce 
leaves. 

Luncheon Stuffed Eggs. — Cut hard- 
cooked eggs in halves lengthwise. Re- 
move the yolks nnd mash them, add 
half the amount of deviled ham and 
enough melted butter to make of the 
consistency to shape. Make into balls 
the size of the yolks and refill the 
whites. Form the remainder of the 
mixture into a nest. Arrange the 
eggs In the nest, pour over one cupful 
of seasoned white sauce. Sprinkle 
with buttered crumbs, and bake until 
the crumbs are brown. 

Apple Dessert. — Wash, core and 
peel eight large apples, leaving a belt 
of skin an Inch and a half wide around 
each. This helps to keep them from 
losing their shape when cooked. Place 
In a casserole and fill with rice and 
raisins mixed together, using one-half 
cupful of cooked rice and one-fourth 
cupful of seedless ralsiiw . "z^r over 
them two cupfuls of hot maple sirup 
and hake until the apples are tender. 
Serve either cold or hot. 

Dresden Sandwiches. — Cut Ftale 
bread into shapely oblongs and dip in- 
to egg, sugar and milk, allowing them 
to soak until soft. Fry In butter and 
brown on both sides. Spread with jum 
nml put together sandwich fashion 
Serve with a hot fruit sauce. 
--*. 




IrCSTCH 





E»eli senator and congressman is 
constantly demanding new or revis- 
ed legislation that will fit in with 
the wishes of his people "back home" 
to whom he must render an account- 
ing, and there is no subject of more 
vital importance just now than that 
of tax reduction. Hence we will set 
senators and congressmen demand- 
ing certain provisions in the bill fav- 
orable to their own people and re- 
sisting other provisions to which 
their people are opposed 

All of the conflicting interests ar.d 
demands must be harmonized and a 
working basis agreed upon that will 
be at least reasonably fair to all 
classes of people and all sections gi 
the country. 

It will be a free show well worth 
witnessing, with our distinguished 
representatives in congress as the 
star performers. 

But we send them to Washington 
for that purpose and we expect them 
to make good. 

Mary Garden has had the same 
maid for fourteen years. So all of 
this talk about artistic temperament 
mast be pure bosh., 

Somebody complains about brick- 
layers being slow. Perhaps thef wait 
for the brick to hatch., 

Thap amy a hatting dog will not 
htte, but a bucking automobile will 
kick. 



(©. 1923, Western Newspaper I'nlun ) 

The true patriot is the man who 
can eat an imitation beefsteak, 
with a smile on his face, and tell 
the woman who prepared it thai 
It is as good as the real thing;. — 
Mrs. Burnett-Smith. 

COLD-WEATHER DISHES. 



The chilly days speed up the ap- 
petite and we enjoy foods that are 
heavy and richer 
than those served 
urln g th» warm 
weather. C a s s e- 
role dishes are 
especially favored 
with those who 
like to put a 
whole meal Into the oven or tireless 
cooker and go off for a ride in the brac- 
ing air, coming back with an appetite 
equal to a good nourishing dish of vege- 
tables and meat. When one lives 
where chestnuts are to be found at a 
reasonable price in the market the fol- 
lowing dish will not be an expensive 
luxury : 

Cateotet Castelnaudary.— This la a 
famous historical dish. Soak a quart 
of lima beans In a saucepan with 
water to cover; put over the heat and 
le t them Juat corns 10 the bulling poin t 





Convert Old Buildings 

Into Houses for Fowls 

(Prepartd br the I'ntted States Dapartmsnt 
of Agriculture. ) 

Many farms have old-style closed-up 
poultry houses, with poor light and 
ventilation, or old sheds and other 
buildings of little use for other pur- 
poses, that can be remodeled or built 
over with little difficulty Into satisfac- 
tory poultry houses for the flocks this 
winter. The size and the shape of the 
building* makes little difference, says 
the United States Department of Agri- 
culture, but the essential factors are 
dryness, good ventilation, freedom 
from drafts, plenty of sunshine, anil 
room enough to allow the birds to move 
about with freedom nnd comfort. 

If new houses are to be built or old 
-buildings. converted Into poultry 
hooves lot ale them on high or sloping 
ground If possible, but always " n <|r . v 
and well -drained soil. The amount of 
floor spiice to he allowed each fowl 
varies somewhat with conditions, but 
on a farm or where the bird* can be 
out of doors nearly every day the de- 
part ment has found that ubout li 1 a 
square f eel of floor space per bird In 
Hocks of 20 is enough. In a village 
or <ity or in a climate where there 
Is a good deal of snow, making it nec- 
essary to confine the birds closely, 4 
or ."r square feet per bird is needed. 
The interior of the house should be 
simple, convenient, and easy to clean. 

The convened poultry house may or 
may not Rave a floor. If the house Is 
on dry, sandy soil a dirt floor is usually 
quite satisfactory although often more 
damp than board or cement floors. 
Fresh gravel and sand must be added 
from time to time to keep them sani- 
tary. If board floors are used, make 
them tight and smooth so as to make 
them dry and easy to clean. If pos- 
sible, build board floors S or 10 inches 
from the ground to allow a circulation 
of air and to prevent rats from har- 
bor-in ; r.sOer them. Cement floors, es- 
pecially for large houses, are quite 
satisfactory, as they keep rats out and 
last much longer than board floors. 
They must be kept well covered with 
litter, however, department workers 
say, to make them warm and com- 
fortable for the flock. 



and then set them aside for an hour. 
Drain the beans, add fresh boiling 
water and set them over the Are and 
cook until nearly done. Place en 
casserole two cupfuls of cooked chick- 
en or duck, turkey or any fat fowl, 
add the drained beans, and onion 
sliced, half a cupful of strained to- 
mato, a quart of chicken broth and a 
teaspoonful of kitchen bouquet. Bake 
one hour, uncover, sprinkle with but- 
tered bread crumbs, chopped parsley, 
brown and serve. 

Oyster Cocktail Sauce.— For fire 
oysters use a teaspoonful of tarra- 
gon vinegar, a tablespoonful of to- 
mato catsup, a teaspoonful of lemon 
juice, four drops of tabasco sauce and 
a pinch of salt. Mix all the season- 
ings thoroughly, add the oysters and 
chill before servtng. Chill sauce, 
grapefruit juice or oyster liquor may 
be added If desired. 

Chestnut en CaaMrol*. — Remove 
shells from three cupfuls of chestnuts, 
pnt Into a casserole and pour over 
three cupfuls of highly seasoned chick- 
en stock. Cover and cook In a slow 
oven for three hours; then thicken 
with two tablespoonfnls of butter and 
one and one-half tablespoonfnls of 
flour, season well with salt, pepper 
and a little grated onion. Combined 
with chicken this makes another de- 
lightful dish. 



Comfortable Houses for 
Ducks Quite Important 

In cold weather ducks should be 
kept In the house because their feet 
are so tender that when they come 
In contact with the cold ground they 
suffer greatly and hobble along as If 
their backs were broken. However, 
they should not be kept hovsed more 
than is really necessary. 

If the roof is good the rest is easy. 
If the weather boarding Is not suf- 
ficiently close to keep out draughts 
In cold weather, cover the outside with 
tarred paper or atrip with lath. 

A board floor is better than an earth 
floor because the ducks will often atlr 
up the ground In a very disagreeable 
manner when there is the least sign of 
moisture. 

Provide suitable houses if you wish 
to be successful. The houses n*ed not 
-he-very expmsive, but they should be 
substantial so that they may be used 
for the same purpose several years in 
succession. 

Ducks, both old and young, should 
have a dry, comfortable place to stay 
In at night. If forced to sit on the 
damp ground they are liable to be 
taken with cramps and colds In the 
head. The latter are almost certain to 
turn to croup. 

There Is usually some shed or build- 
ing that can be converted Into duck 
house at small expense. Where only 
a small flock Is kept this plaa Is ad- 
visable. \ 

Corn Fodder as Litter 
I b Excellent f o r Hen s 



Litter Is almost Indispensable In 
every henhouae where eggs are desired. 
as well as healthy and contented 
fowls. Some farmers complain about 
using good wheat or oat* atraw for the 
hens to scratch In. In this evept, cut- 
corn fodder makes an excelled and 
lasting litter for the poultry house — 
and even If one must pay to have the 
fodder cut. it is cheaper than other Ut- 
ters. 

When cut up, ten bundles of corn 
fodder makes enough litter to cover 
400 square feet of floor space. Vor the 
same apace, when straw Is used, at 
least two bales would be required, and 
this would cost several times nt much 
as the corn fodder. Fodder Is go»>d not 
only because of Its cheapness, hot also 
because the hens like to eat the pieces 
of leaves, thus obtaining some bulky 
food, which is often lacklnr In poultry 
rations. 



f -DAIRY 
HINTS 



I 



Dairyman Should Strive 
to Keep Calves Growing 

In raising heifer calves, the delry- 
roun should seek to keep them growing 
constantly. A setback or slump In 
growth Is costly and* difficult to over- 
come, the New York state agricultural 
college at Ithaca has found. 

Many good calves have been well fed 
and well grown until weaned, and then 
when turned out to pasture, have been 
neglected and stunted. Often this 
stunting la permanent, and under-sited 

ivwn ■Vault. 

It Is usually better not to turn calves 
out to pusture until after they are 
weaned, as it Is much easier to feet) 
and care for them In the barn. Some 
fanners never pasture calves born af- 
ter January 1, during the first summer. 
By this means they avoid heat and 
flies, which keep young calves from 
growing in summer. 

Any pasture intended for calves 
shwiiUl have plenty uf water and plenty 
of shade. If p ossibl e, it should be lo- 
cated near the barn In order to make 
It convenient to watch over the calves, 
provide salt and give feed. They 
should have some grain ut least once 
a day. If normal growth is expected, 

In most cases about two pounds Is 
enough for each calf. The following 
mixture is recommended: Three hun- 
dred pounds corumeul, hominy feed or 
ground barley. 800 pounds ground outs. 
.'too pounds wheat bran. 

One hundred pounds of linseed oil 
meal may l>e added to this with good 
results, and it is advisable to do so 
during late summer, when hot weather 
has dried up the pasture und reduced 
the protein content of the grass. 

After the calves reuch an age of 
nine to ten months, grain feeding de- 
pends entirely upon the condition of 
the pasture. If it la plentiful, green 
and succulent, good growth can be ob- 
tained without grain. But If it Is short 
and dried up, It should be supplement- 
ed by the concentrate feeds. 



§ FORD BATTERIES K 

$15.50* 

Guaranteed One Year. 



Don't fail to give us a trial, for wc have won- 
ful values for your money in all size batteries. 

Recharge Battery Repair 



ftDempsey Motor Car Co., 

18 ERLANGER. KENTUCKY SI 

K 
I 



Phone Erl. 70-L 



State Averages of Age 
at Which Cows Are Sold 

<Prrpaied by Ih* I'nJtad, • J *«ir* Pepartinen' 
of Agriculture ) 

The average age of milch cows when 
slaughtered for beef is ten years, and 
the price realized for such cows is 
about one-half the price brought by 
younger cows sold for milking pur- 
poses, according to a nation-wide In- 
vestigation of present conditions mmle 
this yeur by the United States depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

State averages of the age ut which 
cows are sold for slaughter were re- 
markably uniform, there being no 
state with an average under nine 
years and no state with un average 
over eleven years. States showing an 
average of eleven years were Mary- 
land, West Vlrglnia-.vJ- ,, "' , .!s, Wiscon- 
sin, Louisiana, Utah and Nevada. 
States with an average of nine years 
were New Hampshire, Massachusetts, 
Connecticut, South Carolina. Georgia 
and Alabama. 

In the early spring this year, when 
the survey was made, milch cows 
showed an average sale price of $.'{2 
per head when sold for slaughter, or 
about M) per cent of the average price 
of $03 for cows sold at the same time 
for milking purposes. 



Tell Value of Sire by 

Production of Progeny 

The wisest dairyman In the world 
cannot tell a prepotent bull by hla 
looks or by his breeding. There Is 
no known way of telling a valuable 
sire only by his progeny. If his heif- 
ers are better producers than their 
dams he is a good bull — worth his 
weight in gold, but If his heifers are 
no Improvement over their dams, or if 
not so good, then he Is worthless as a 
sire. 

Who can tell what the result will be 
when you mate an unknown bull with 
poor cows? No man can. The most 
perfect individual, according to stand- 
ards, might be absolutely worthless, 



Pure Air Is Essential 

to Health of Laying Hen 

It has been estimated that the hen 
consume* twice as much air as a horse 
does, pound for pound of weight, and 
three tlmea as much as a cow, and yet 
we see ben houses with no mesas of 
getting any pure air Into them except 
through cracks, which may give 4 di- 
rect draft over soma bird. With other 
conditions favorable to the develop 
ment of gtrins. there soon are rolda, 
roup and bronchial disorders of maui 
kinds. 



and I f bin s ir e w as ■ p r o v ed p repotent 
bull and his dam had a world's record 
he might not have this unknown, mys- 
terious power of prepotency. He 
might transmit undesirable qualities 
Instead of desirable ones. 



DAIRY NOTES 



The time to train cowa to eat well 

of roughage Is when they are young. 

• • » 

Cow testing eliminate* the cow kept 
at a loss, raises the average produc- 
tion of the herd and Increases the 
profits from dairying. 

• • • 

Several weeks of liberal feeding with 
good roughage and from six to ten 
pounds of grain a day while cows, art 
dry Is good insurance fur efficient pro- 
duction in the next lactation period. 

• ♦ • 

A cold separator will not do good 
work. It Is beat to run about a gal- 
lon of warm water through the bowl 
to warm It before turning on the milk. 

• • • 

The main reason wby allege Is such 
a good milk feed Is because of its suc- 
culence. The Juices In 11 stimulate 
tbe row to higher production. 

• • • 

Kvery dairyman should work out bis 
own feeding rations, using tbe feeds 
be t*D grow most ecuuuuilcally. th«n 
buying tbose be cannot grow in the 
and cheapest forms. 



C. Scott Chambers 

WALTON. KENTUCKY 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



OF 



SERVICE, TENDERNESS 
AND ALERTNESS. 



printed 
-5tat.09e.ry 

AT THIS OFFICE 



for business people. 

for professional people. 

tor farmers. 

for every one who wants 
to be considered up to 
date and going strong 

ENVELOPES. LETTERHEADS, NOIEHEADS, STATEMENTS 



SEE OUR 1924 

HUDSON & ESSEX MODELS 

All Essex are 6-Cylinder and built by the 
HUDSON MOTOR CAR CO. 



Hudson Sedan 2,020.00 

Hudson Coach 1,585.00 

Hudson Speedster • 1 ,470.00 

Hudson 7 Passenger $1,525.00 

Essex Coach 6-Cylinder 1,060.00 

Essex Touring 6-Cylinder 930.00 

Above prices are delivered. 

B. HUME, 

25 E. Fifth St., .vington, Ky. 



a 



A BARGAIN 



Cincinnati Daily Enquirer 



—AND— 



The Boone County Recorder 



YOU CAN GET 



Jill lor $5.00 WEAR 

Send Your Subscriptions to the 

BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 

Burlington, Ky. 



♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ •••••••••••••••••••••—— 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It One year. 

UrPOnl **"H to Re«U All TNea Ads lnl hi* iMuo.-m 
»+»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦»♦< 




— »»— ^— — ^V^^BWIHBOTBMI 



BOON E CO UNTY RECORDER. 



» voa. xxxxvi i 1 1 



Established 1875 



BURLINGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, JANUARY 3 1, 1924 $1.50 Per Year No 15 



WASHINGTON COMMENT. 

As was to be expected, there ha* 
been much "snap judgment" of the 
peace plan selected to receive the 
Bok prize. Those who believe in the 
League of Nations think is wonder- 
ful; those against the League of Na- 
tions call it nonsense. 

But it would seem that a fair- 
minded consideration of the prise 
plan would not begin with the 
statement that "it is good" or_"it is 
poor," would not '•-msid'*'- "this is 
propaganda" or "this is the start e* 
the milenium." To m*ny thinking 
people the substance of the winning 
plan is of small account. Students 
of history know that mankind hns 
sought for peace for thousands of 
years, and never yet found the. road; 
that a plan offered as the result of a 
prize, should immediately succeed 
where humanity has failed, would be 
miraculous. Only the credible expect- 
ed any such marvel to occur. 

What the peace plan has done, is 
doing, and will do, is to focus the 
thoughts of many people on the 
•problem of peace. No enduring in- 
&«tution is the handiwork of one 
nl^; war itself is not the product 
of one man or group of men, but the 
result of centuries of experience. 
Peace is then as difficult to practice 
as war; as difficult to attain as war 
is easy to get into; that a fair high- 
way to its permanent adoption by a 
war- weary world could be found by 
one man or one group of men in one- 
lifetime is not to be expected. 

But the peace plan offer, the peace 
plan prize, the winning plan itself, 
make us think eace, talk peace, ar- 
gue peaVe. Let the whole world ar~ 
BUI peace, instead of war; let all na- 
tions question war instead of em- 
bracing it when it comes, and we will 
have peace, just as we have learned 
how to have and live with liberty, 
equality, humane justice and civ^l 
law, all at one time, things sought as 
earnestly and as hopelessly as we to- 
day seek for permanent and lastin.; 
guarantees of peace. 

DEALING WITH CRIME 



MASON 

Cynthia Ann Mason was born on 
March 20th, 1840, and departed this 
life Jan. 15th, 1924. She leaves one 
isster (a twin) Mrs. G. L. Smith. 
She was the daughter of B. J. and 
Conna Mason, and was married to 
James T. Mason Dec. 16th, 1875. 
Her husband departed this life Oct. 
9th, 1893. 

She was 83 years, 9 months and 
19 days of age. She has been a very 
devoted member of the Big Bone 
Baptist church for 60 years. Her 
consistent christian character, he;*- 
egnerous and hospitable spirit, her 
unfailing love and kindness to her 
friendB and acquaintances made her 
a universal favorite. She will be 
mourned by a large circle of friends 
and relatives. 

Her influence will live to bless the 
Fenerations to come; as one of her 
and her husbands greatest ambitions 
was the wonderful success of he:- 
cousin, the Rev. Dr. W. B. Riley, 
pastor of the First Baptist church 



THE MONTHOFFEBRUABY 

This being leap year, the month 
of February, 1924, which begins to- 
morrow, (Friday) has twenty-njne 
days — the extra day being added ev- 
ery four years in order to give the 
women who are so inclined, to pro- 
pose. On the second Mr. Ground 
Hog will venture from his under- 
ground home and come forth to tell 
us the kind of weather we are to 
have for the next six weeks. On th-j 
12th the birthday c* Lincoln will be 
observed, and c-. the 22nd Washing 
ton's birthday. We look back a few 
years to the time when February 12 
and February 22 received slight con- 
sideration as holidays; today there is 
hardly a community in the country 
which is not disposed to do full hon- 
or to the dates and to what they rep- 
resent. The 14th is St. Valentine's 
day. Old people still remember 
when valentines were as popular a 
Christmas cards 



WOMEN KNOW THEIR DESIRES 
AND GENERALLY GET THEM 



Women are the buyers of the na- 
tion. Very probably, in a year the 
average woman makes a thousand >r 
more purchsses. She buys many dif- 
ferent food products, scores of fab- 
rics and wearing apparel, shoes mil. 
linery, toilet articles and many 
things for her home. 

To be able to judge the quality of 
each, she would have to be a chemist, 
a TTicttallurgist, an engineer, and a 
"pecialist in every line. 

She is none of these. So, if sh s 
has the choice, she buys the goous 
she knows rather than those the 
does not know. 

And she is going to have 
choice as long as our present civiliv:- 



RICHARD T. GERMAN 

Former Well Known Boone County 
Citizen* Oone to His Reward. 



ation continues for she is boss of the | 



and the postma-i 
of Minneapolis, Minn., for the past ' K r " aned under his load on the mart! 
2G years, with a membership of 2,- ing of the 1 lth 



that deeds 
on even after 



750, which proves 
Christianity lives 
death. 

Geo. L. Smith and family, Walton, 
Ky., 36 N. Main St. 



WAR IN THE PEACE CONTEST. 



The example that Philadelphia set 
by driving out its criminals might be 
followed by other large cities — but 
it won't be. 

Even if- it were, it wouid-have-iti 
disadvantages. 

The grp«* difficulty with "clean-up 
drives" is that they are sporadic ami 
short-lived, while crime never sleeps. 

Another objection is that the city 
that sets about to wash its skirts in- 
flicts its objectional citizens on its 
neighbors. 

The same is as true of small city 
as of large. 

Vice is seldom if ever corrected 
by compelling it to change location. 
While one group of society may be 
temporarily relieved by the disap- 
pearance of the immoral element, 
another group is made to suffer nil 
the more. * 

Every community applauds when 
an official gives an oiender his r.f 
her freedom with the proviso that 
t hey v leave. 

Thus a chronic violator of the lav, 
is set free to prey upon some other 
town or city and cause further trou- 
ble. 

Punishment seems tq be the only 



When Edward W. Bok started af- 
ter the hag of gold at the end of the 
rainbow, namely peace, he dkTn't <•>;_ 
pect to find pewter. 

When Henry Ford chartered a ship 
and took a crowd of idealists to Eur- 
ope to get the soldiers out of the 
trenches by Christmas, he accomp- 
lished about as much as Mr. Bok h-,s 
with his American Peace Award. 

Mr. Ford, in search of peace, en- 
countered nothing but war arnon^ 
his guests. 

Mr. Bok, after the same elusiv ■ 
object, started a war among the con- 
testants. 

The sum total of the manuscrips 
submitted was 22,100. Each was lin- 
tveo %o u,\>o\> words. 

The judges returned a decision i 
that was said to be unanimous, | 

which leads to the conclusion that ] "' av a-bed and shut my eyes all the 
they read all the manuscripts. If \ wonting till 'he' came, for I would 



Many curious old charms are sai 1 
to be potent on St. Valentine's »vj 
— all, like most charms ever invert- 
ed, connected with the procuring >i 
I husbands. Even before surplus wo- 
i man dawned on the scene, this seems 
' to have been a subject of much 
anxiety. 

Five bay leaves, pinned respect- 
ively to the four corners and the 
center of the pillow, are said to bring 
certain dreams of the future part- 
ner, if the sleeper has gone to bed 
without eating or speaking. 

Another infallible spell was to 
write the names of admirers, on sep- 
arate pieces of paper, enclose them 
in clay balls and throw them into 
water. The one which came to tho 
surface first contained the name of 
the fated spouse. 

It is a sign of great good luck if 
the swain you favor should be the 
first man seen on February 14. The 
modern girl who does not pin her 
faith entirely to signs and omens, c : in 
always practice the ruse of n 
shrewd maiden of long ago, who, 
m ow ing where her heart had gone] 



they passed upon all submitted, it 
would require the reading of one ev- 
ery minute during the eight worki:i„ 
hours « f every day during the time 
allotted for the contest. 

This" ii> elm- df the very good rea • 
sons why srme of the 22,»99 losing 
contestant^ have raised their voices 
in complai: t. 

This is aist> one of the reasons why- 
the senate is investigating Mr. BokV 
thorny road to peace. 

Whatever the outcome, Mr. Bo'c 
must be convinced by thii* time that 
finding peace for the world is morj 
hazardous than lifting the soldiers 
out of the trenches by Christmas. • 



not have seen anotho. man befon- 
him lor all the world." 



THE FARMERS TAXES 



AGED LAWYER 



IS SERIOUSLY INJURED 



The N'ational Industrial Confer- 
ense board finds that the farmer pay; 
more than his share of the nation'?, 
taxes. The figures for 1922 show 
that the ratio of taxation to income 
for the agricultural classes war, 
about 17 per cent, while for the re- 
mainder of the community it wa 1 
about 12~.p»»- cent. 

Taxation has already rested heav 
ily on the farmer. His land 



merchandise 
is jealous (if 



home. She governs tht 
that enters it and "she 
her prerogatives. 

The retail merchants who want to 
win her patronage must make a bid 
for it; convince her of their inten- 
tion and ability to give her merchan- 
dise of known value; and then liv • 
up to the standard they set for 
themselves. 

For she is a just but ruthl e ss bos»fi 
She never forgets nor fifeives. Sh ■ 
rewards loyal service .<.%i loyalty, 
but she severely condemns broken 
faith. 

Her favor is the road to success; 
her indifference, dismal failure. 



M. W. A.. NOTES 



R. T. German, 85 years of age, 
many years ago, a well known citizen 
of Florence, died at the home of his 
son, J. A. German, at Cheviot, ()h : o, 
Thursday, Jan. 24th 1924, after a 
few week's illness from infirmities 
incident to old age. "Dick" German 
as he was known by the older pen- 
pie of this county, w~* b^-rn at B ; - 
ming.ham, Alabama, and until about 
twenty-five years ago made his hor-.i 
at Florence. 

His wife, who was Miss Sarah I 
th * ' *' u "' loVe ' preceded him to the great 
1 beyond about five years ago. He i? 
survived by four children — two MffiS 
and two daughters, as follows: Mrs. 
William Truutsr.au, of Chicago, M.-. 
Jennie beans, of Cincinnati, J. \. 
German, of Cheviot, Ohio, and R. 1. 
German, of Cincinnati, and several 
grandchildren. 

In yean gone by there never w;i - 
a county fair in this part of the 
State that It. T. German was not in 
the show ring riding or driving a 
fine horse. In his passing away e 
long and useful life has ended, oil I 
his many friend* in the county wi;i 
be grieved to hear of his death. 

The remains were brought to Flor- 
ence, Monday, Jan. 28th, and at 1 
o'clock p. m., were laid to rest be- 
neath the sod in the cemetery at tha: 
place in the presence of a large num- 
ber of relatives and friends. 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 



Senator .1. A. Lee has introduced 
in the Legislature a bill to make the 
road from Florence to Burlington, to- 
Belleview a part of the State road 
system, a.-, this road terminates near 
where the United States Govern- 
ment ;. building Dam ;>x on the Ohio- 
river, it is thought the road will be 
entitled to aid from the Government.. 



Representative Simmon* has 



i use 



intro- 
>f Rep- 



duced a like bill in the II 
resentatives. 

Ar.-th:-:- '.,>5 ,. now pending be- 
fore the House .,f Representatives. 
If it b eco me s a law h will make- the 
lead from Constance to Hebron; Bul- 

littsville, Mlewikl to Peter. burn- «nd 

from Idl< wild to BurluiKto,, a part of 
! the State road system. I h. 
i Fion-r.CP to Union tu \\ iit 
| a nan of the primal j n. 
I ami there i- a hill pi nding sqfgi 
J to award that route and give B 
' county as much mileage of the » 

ystem as possible. 



roaa :rom 
.-a v. U now 
ad eyste i, 

i-Xii 1 .': 



Will 'am . v 
:' irftier, of 

I.- .1. w:i- 

transacting 



Lo 



•e. indU 

•1st (if 



striuus younj 
>ve neichbor 



tin 



I *'. 



«ck- 

K 



t'een, I;ut T U i:' dn.,\ 

■ - ne w .ip<l calling q.i 

old i re m! and neigi 

Hem lev who has been 

ie bouse for a week or 

i ailed at our 



warn 
ed to Oil' bouse 
with asthma. II. 

and renewed his subscription 

lie subscription of his jrood 



iK 



At a metting of the members of 
Patriarch Camp No. 72001, Modem 
Woodmen of America at Burlington 



FARM AND HOME NEWS 

FROM OVER KENTUCKY 

John R. Spencer, .Mercer count;, 
agent has placed one car load of An- 



more 
i.niee 

; ; d t 

mother, .Mr-. Rebecca Sebree, of E.- 
langer. Mrs. Sebree enjoys th- 
weekly visitor as she depends on it to 
hring the news to her home, and 
keep* her posted as to what her old 
friends ami neighbors are doing back 
in the home of her younger days. 



a few nights ago, Lee Craddock, who ' gus calves among his calf clubs i 
is a member of this camp, was repor:- ; is plnnnng to place another carload 
ed ill with pneumonia. A committee I of Shorthorns. A committee of 12 
was appointed to look after him and prominent cattle men havs been as- 
after hearing the report of the com- ! sisting in the work and have pre- 
mittee a collection was taken up ' pared a set of recommendations t- 
amoas the mairbsrs «f the camp and be followed in caring for the calve:. 

a goc 1 -upply of provisions was sent \ 

him by Elijah Stephens and a to l One of the most spectacular activ- 
and a half of coal was ordered sen. ; ities of the Petersburg Commtfnitv 
to him. Mr. Craddoek's dues were -t* | Club of Boone county, according ? > 
so paid for three months. | cour.ty agent W. D. Sutton was the 

The Woodmen do 



not pay si< k 
benefits under their by laws, bu«, 
when necessary to help a neiKhbj: 
in distress or sickness, it is done vo» 
untaiily by a ^t>v win offering 
among the members. 

Mr. E. J. Aylor very kindly offer 
ed to haul the coal free of ehargo 
for Mr. Craddock. 



Charles Strother, 71 Year. Old, Hit 

By Automobile on Scott 

Street, Covington. 



Charles Strother, 71 years old, re 
l tired lawyer, was seriously injured 
alternative for wilful and persistent ' when he was hit by an automobile a> 
violation of the law. The tendency 
of the times is to trp corrective 
methods by means of suspended sen- 
tences in cases of first or infrequent 
offenses, but even this method has its 
limitations. 

Crime will always have to be dealt 
with, but there is some question 
whether "clean-up" drives get the 
best results. 

Law enforcement that is as alert 
as crime is the thing that's needed 
to keep vice on the run — aw en- 
forcement not here and there, but 
every place. 

No community can afford t» «lln «, 



buildings and stock and machinery 
can not escape the eyes of the auth 
orities, and are sure to be assessed. 
The country populations need !o 
study carefully the costs of operat- 
ing their state, county, and local 
governments, to make sure hat the 
work is done in a business like, sys- 
, tematic, and economical way, as 
such a large part of these costs arj 
paid by the farming and country 
town population. 



Patdiarch Camp of Burlington is 
having degree work every Tuesdny 
night and prospects look good to 
have work every week this winter. 
A large number of the members are 
and | present each meeting night. 



Patriarch Camp meets promptly at 
7:30 every Tuesday night. 

A HOME COMING HINT 



control of the wat e rm e lon bug (strin- 
ed beetle) by the use of free nfcotimi 
dust compound. Farmers in the Pet- 
ersburg bottoms grow hundreds ol 
acre ..? watermelons and grow them 
better than in any other place this 
side of the famous Missouri" water- 
melon region. For many years this 
I bug has been a menace, much of tha 
| time destroying the entire field, for 
countless thousands of the bugs come 
, in a single night from the willows 
nnd hedges along the river. But the 
control was so effective during the 
past season that in one instance two 
farmers counted 220 dead bugs on n 
single hill fifteen minutes after fog- 
ging with the poisonous dust. 



The Republicans of the State wilt 
•hold mass conventions in each coun- 
ty in the State at 1 o'clock Feb. 9th, 
1 for the purpose of selecting dele- 
Kates to the State Convention which 
meets at Louisville, Feb. 12th. O.i 
the basis of one delegate for each < 
. i"C0 votes cast in the last presiden- 
tial (lection the county of Beonc? 
will he entitled to rive delegates. 

W . K. Walton, well known citizer* 
nnd farmer of the Point Pleasant 
r.t'ijshhorhood, was a business visitor 
to Burlington, last Thursday. Mr. 
Walton, who has been a reader of 
the kecorder many years called in to 
see the : rint> rs for a tew minutes — 
U ■.-• enough to -••.. "howdy and good- 



Wlu 



TO URGE MILITARY ROAD 



Representative A. B. Route To 
troducc Bill in Congren. 



disregard for law to get the upper 
hand because it breeds crime. Where 
a wholesome respect for law exists, 
there crime does not often loiter. 



APPRECIATION FOR EFFORT 



There are some folks who admire 
greatly things located far from their 
homes, but they have but little ap- 
preciation for efforts that may he 
put forth by their next door neigl* 
bor. 

The lack of appreciation is some- 
thing that holds back many commun- 
ities. People may work hard to carry 
on public causes and then find that 
the good things they do are rarely 
praised. Meanwhile if they make 
some little slip, it may be generally 
ridiculed, and they may not hear the 
last of it for months or years. 

When people give honest effort to 
carry on the organisations of their 
home town and promote its causes, 
they should get some very generous 
recognition. If they make mistakes 
they should be passed over lightly 
I more of this spirit prevailed, it 
would be easier to carry on commun- 
ity efforts. 

There are lots of dangerous co - 
ners in these days of fast driving 



as 

he was crossing Eighteenth street at 
Scott boulevard, Covington, last Sur.- 
oay night. 

Mr. Strother, who resides in the 
Willingford Apartments, Twentieth 
street, Covington, was on the way to 
attend services at the St. Luke Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Eighteenth 
and Greenup streets. He was remov- 
ed to Booth Memorial Hospital, Cov- 
ington, where physicians said he had 



ONE CHILD IN CLUB WORK 

Two thousand farmers in North 
Carolina have signed a pledge do 
signed to "improve farming condi 
tions in North Carolina. This pledge 
included ten points, and one of these 
ten was "To enroll at least one child 
in club work." 

It would mean a lot to any rurid 
a 



community if a child from everv such a manner that they will not wai 
home could be enrolled in some kind i 80 lon £ to conie "home" again, 
of production or home eeonmies I il nas ,)een said that wherever th* 
work. The children in the town cen- ' Ker >tuckian travels he earnestly and 
suffered a compound fracture of thu ters should be enrolled as well, and ■ affectionately remembers his native 



With the time for Kentucky's 
HOME COMING celebration but fiw 

months away it would be wise fo.- | Washington, Jan. 27 — Represen* 
the citizens of Boone county I > \ ative Arthur B. Rouse, of Coviiurtir 
commence formulating pins for a re- \ Ky., is to introduce a bill tomorrow 
ception, reunion or similar event to construct and to maintain a mi«- 
nere m Boone county for old friends itary road between Camp KSox Mil 
and relatives who are planding to be I itary Reservation, in Hardin count 
with us for a short visit in June. 

Many of these Kentuckians who 
are coming back for the Home Com- 
ing celebration have not seen their 
old friends and relatives in mai.'y 
years and it is our duty to not only 
make their visit a pleasant one, but 
to see that they are entertained in 



left leg, a fracture of his left arm 
and a severe scalp wound. 

Mr. Strother said the accident oc 
curred so suddenly h e did no t 



member what hit him 

Albert Fessler, 20 years old, Do- 
coutscy. Ky., employee in the Louis- 
ville and Nashville Railroad Com- 
pany s l hops at Deeoureey, drtver-of 
the automobile, was arrested on a I 
change of reckless driving. He 



most of them could maintain a gar- i hills and plains; his thoughts turn ;; 

den or keep poultry or pigs. With i incessantly toward home as those of 

one child in every home in Boono ! the Swiss; he invokes the genius o» 



county s tudying haw country life can 
be made more e cient, conditiors 
in this section could be radically im- 
proved in a few years. 

FORD OUTPUT FOR YEAR 

The Ford Motor Company made 



ten you are Uro-ij-bt lace to faot> 
with any matter that is controlled. 
by the law of the State in which you 
reside, you can but submit to the- 
law's mandate, no matter whether- 
you disapprove ;he lueascrae or nor. 
In the matter of public improve- 
ments 'twould ' be a difficult matter 
to please everybody concerned. 

There is a evident desire upon the> 
part of a majority of people to do all 
the good they can and as little harm 
as possible. When misfortune or. dis- 
aster overtakes any of Boone coun- 
ty's people, a ready response to their- 
needs is always given and th* ' 
weight of their suffering relieved.. 

In some communities the younger 

aeiu.ation are having a swell time 

mumps; while in other communities- 
Kentucky, and the Ft. Thomas "Re*- I th ,f y are bein|r " larfe to cough-up— 
ervation, in Campbell county, Ky i wno °P ,n «f co «*n. »"<» SB the next 
The route of the road provided \ ! l ° W " >?" W,U hnd they are h » vin '^ 
the bill would connect the county I ° m * a8l * y t ltne with ™»dea. 

seats of the counties of Boone, Gal- A .. *T" 

latin, Carroll, Trimble, Oldham and ! ^o^e to the tax books just 
Jefferson. I c<»»P>led by Tax Commissioner Ca- 

The bill authorizes the appropria- ! SOn ' the , total assessi "ent of Boono 
tion of whatever sum is necessary t< ! «"",« °^ - th ' year 1923 ' is $12 '" 
build the road and directs the Seer. - ' SiS*i , ,S a uecrea9e of $12,- 

tary of War to construct it of road ' 1922 ail ?* 8 ? m «»^ 

material that he deems to be best ! , - -5S-- 

and moat durable. -" : ' • '■ l ■' ''PbeM—f^Mj trill, widow- 

- ,_ l •' nt 1 !* •'• C. Cantrill, was elected 

It looks like that the people hare- J Stat t LlDr arian, last Wednesday, by 
ly become reconciled to one condi- I a Joint s * s s»on of the Senate and 



. ;" 5. 2 s s 8 *, srsfors. ,;:;: 



ents. Fessler told police that he did 
not see the man step in front of hi3 
car until it was too late to avoid hin . 
Mr. Strother formerly resided at 
Walton, Ky., where he had practiced 
law many years, until his removal to 
Covington a few .years ago. 

WANTS TO HEAR FROM YOU 



Frankfort, Ky., Jan. 25, 1924 
Editor Boone County Recorder, 

Burlington, Ky., 
Dear Sir: 

I should like to hear from the peo- 
ple of Boone county upon any mat- 
ters that would be of help to them, 
/.-oming before the Generar Assembly 
Also upon any matter they may want 
brought before the Assembly. 

Respectfully, 
J. A. LEE. 

Marriage license were obtained at 
the Clerk's office in Covington, last 
Wednesday by L. Kendall, 21 years 



on. wh.r. < f.th.r« <, HT r0 °" *' th " I V 1<1 railr0,d * m *°y*: »"J ''"•rfe'na 
on. where father finds his young son I Beach, 21, both of Verona, this 
puUing on a cigarette. ty. 



conn 



m any previous year, according to < 
production figures for the year an- ' 
nounced. Of the total 1,915,48:. 
automobiles and trucks were made 
in this country and 175,474 in for- 
eign plants, including Canada. Tj 
the total of these are added 101 - 
898 tractors and 7,825 Lincoln carl 
The figures were coupled with an 
announcement that the Ford Com- 
pany expects to exceed this figure in 
its 1924 production and that i*s 
plans to start early this spring oi> 
its program of 10,000 cars daily. 

The importance of radio in th3 
production and marketing of agri 
cultural products is brought out in a 
special survey of about 1,200 repres 
entaUve farmers, just, completed oy 



of 84 to 43. 



lie nature, than something els 
Springs to the surface to again put 

the "whole machinery" out of gear. u lh th <? weather hanging around 
This time it seems to be the que, j z - ro a ton of $10.50 coal melts away 
tion of a State bond issue of $75,- ! IiJce ic e in summer time, and shows 
000,000. Last week The Reform- r ' > ou wh: ' becomes of your last sum- 
published a list of the uses to which ! mer ' s savir gs. 
this large sum of money would be 



his country, in iruuble, fl&hger and Uo " » f affairs hi the mater of a put, ' !I »"^ "f Rep r esentatives by a vote 
solitude; it is to him the home of 
plenty, beauty, greatness and every- 
thing that he desires and respects- 
his nationality never deserts him, no 
country will bear a comparion wich 
his country; no people with his own 
people. 

That's a Kentuckian for you ! Le'.*3 
prove to him in June that he is right. 

RED GROSS NEWS. 

The subscriptions of some Junior 
Auxiliaries are expiring this an 1 
next month. A prompt renewal will 
keep issues of the Junior news from 
being missed. 



National Headquarters commend 
ed the Boone County Chapter for this 

year's increase in membership . 

gain of 40. 

In the feeding of pigs an acre of 
clover or alfalfa pasture will save 1,- 
148 pounds corn and 468 pounds of 
tankage as compared with dry-Ijt 



^i" BSa»7>? i £3?'.^ in *• A " im " """ 




reporting homemade sets rang 
from .mi,,],, crystal detectors to tube 
•eta. 



ongfeas has 

lull* yet, hut „ 

iced 



not passed many 

large numfear hiv, 
and pigeonholed 



Notwithstanding the fact that this; 
is Leap Year we have not heard of 
ary marriage license being issued by 
thc County Clerk since the first of 
the \tar. 



put Jh the event the issuance of the 
bonos was voted, as suggested by 
Governor Fields. If the Legislature 
authorizes a vote on the question, 
then the matter will be entirely in 

the hands of the qualified voters o;" j — — ~ 

the State, and there should be "no ' Thc °' J tput of motor vehicles in 
kick" over the result, no' matter j the Un '^d States during the ye.ic 
which way it is decided. — Reformer i ,<J23 Was 3,o36,5. r ,i) passenger auto- 
— i.i _. j "'-'biles and 874,2ft? trucks. 

Don't overlook the fact that there ! 

are yet 50 more winter days unt ; l > Attorney Fmb-t, ol Covingto... 

March 20th, at which time Spnn I was in B »""bngton, test Wednesday,, 

weather is supposed to set in no" ' deK;:, K' Into the Records at the Coun! 

the further fact that often warm r ' ty l tefk ' a °' T ' 1 * 

weather frequently fails to rea, , ; — — 

this locality until well up in th I Today Thursday) Ls tK t . [ aat d ay 

month of April. If your coal bin is "' >fa*w#ry i;*L'4, ami wa know of no. 

becoming low, it is the signal for I y,u ' ;haf » R'kviof «*er its passing 

you to call on your local dealers, and ' n : ' v 

replenish your ooal house be for* th, 

c<»ld days catches you aslcvp on tK 

job. 



According to Ta» Commtastenei 
Otl'l 1923 books, H„„i„. county 
Ima 1860 dogs, and the raeordi at the 
County Clerk'H office -how th«t on U 
tbout COO owner* haw ■* 
FOAM tm t hi ir .i 



I 



luo Id l>c .i hapyy world, «ayn 
ihirfc, it we could draw our 

(lot 



»'!!!.) .t 



u'lK liny work. 



II ¥ Bougbaer, p( Coving 
*.i* transacting bus,n< 

•" >■ ho . 1 1, »,!«,. i 



X 



«aaL 



BOONE COUNTY RE. CORDER 



PAGE VW 



TLORENCE THEATRE 

ILORENCE, KY. 



Every 



Tubs. ™« Sat. 



THE BEST 



MOVING PICTURES 

Admission 22c A 10c 



FLORENCE. 

Mrs. Geo. Swim spirit Thursday 
^•i»J» *fr« John Swim. 

J. D. Loess is the pround owner f f. 



VVsLTuN. 

Rev. Dr. W. B. Riley, of Minnea- 
polis, Minn., attended the funeral cu 
his cousin Mrs. Cynthia Ann Mason, 
of Walton, where she had been mak- 
ing her home with G. L. Smith ai 
wife, and niece Cynthia White, fo 
some time. He returned home the 
same afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Smith have 
been very poorly at their home in 
A\ ,\iton for the last two weeks. 




PETERSBURG. 

Lot of ice in the river. 

Mr. Wood Sullivan, Sr., and wife 
spent last Friday with your scribe. 

Rev. Chastine filled his appoint- 
ment at the Baptist church here Sun- 



a new Ford machine. \ Ed. Geim's mother died last Sun- 

Mrs. Roscoe Bryant spent Tues- yday a t the home or her daughters in 

day night with Mrs. Ed. Osborne. Cincinnati. 

L. T. Utz and wife, of Burlington, J Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd McGlasson and 

attended church here Sunday night, children spent Sunday with Benjamin 



Jessie Lucas entertained her cousin 
Evelyn Tanner one night last week. 

Evelyn Tanner spent last week 
with her grandmother Mrs. Lucy 
Tanner. 

Mrs Ben Riley, of Union, spent 
one day last week with Mrs. Lucy 
Tanner. 

Miss Anna Carlton spent Thursday 
in Cincinnati guest of her niece Mrs. 
Bradley Sayre. 

Geo. Swim spent one afternoon 
last week with his parents, John 
Swim and wife. 

Lillian Butler is staying at Dr. 
Castleman's and finishing out the 
term of school. 

Mrs. Cora Stephens expects to 
\jeave soon for Florida to visit her 
p»n Lloyd and family. 
3l4is3 Myrtie Stephens was quite 
poorly a couple of days last week at 
her home on Shelby-st. 

Mrs. Dr. Simpson, of Covington, 
attended church Sunday at the BajS, 
tist church at Florence. 

Willis Grant and wife had for 

\ their guest last week Mrs. Ma', 
graves, of TJullittsville. 
OFitzhugh Tanner and wife spent 
Wednesday evening out at J. P. Tan- 
ner's on Burlington pike 



Crisler and wife. 

Your scribe is very much under 
the weather at this time confined to 
her home with a severe cold. * 

>Mrs. D. B. Huffman has been quite 
ill for over a week, confined to her 
bed, but is some better we are glad 
to* report. 

Hugh Arnold's machine turned ov- 
er going from this place to his home 
on the Woolper hill, but as good 
luck would have it no one was hurt. 

Mr. and Mrs. O. N. Scott enter- 
tained Sunday at six o'clock dinner, 
Mr.and Mrs. Harold Huey, of Ply- 
mouth, Illinois, and W. B. Arnold 
and sister Flora of Belleview. Also 
0. N. Scott and wife entertained last 
Monday for six o'clock dinner Mrc. 
Maggie Kirtley and son Robert and 
sister Hattie Kirtley and Miss Mat- 
tie Kreylich, of Idlewild. 



5 

guest J 



HOPEFUL 

Miss Ora Robbins was the 
Sunday of Miss Rosa Barlow 
j Owen Aylor has been suffering 
with acute rhtumatism the past few 
days. 

Wm. Snyder and wife spent Sun- 
day with her parents, 0. E. Aylor 



Mrs. C. H. Tanner and daughter and wife - 
Helen, spent one day last week wit?V Mrs - Annie Beemon spent last Sat- 
her mother. Mrs. Lucv Conner. f\ urda >' evening with Mrs. Jno. Swim, 

> > •» » s~* • m% m M - * ski 7inV>on>tn 



MT. ZION. 

(Too Late for Last Week) 

— *\Ir. and # Mrs. Elmer Carpenter 
spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Wal- 

,er Grubbs. 
Mrs. Cora Stephens is spending :s 

ew days with Mr. and Mrs. Cecil 

anner and son, of Petersburg. 
_^Mr. and and Mrs. Carey Carpenter 
and son spent Sundap with Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Carpenter, of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Glacken and 
family spent the week-end with Mr. 
nd Mrs. Frank Snyder, of Erlanger. 

Mr. and Mrs. Eli Surface and son 
spent Saturday with Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Surface and little daughter, 
of Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Bassett and 
family are enterlainin K Mr. and M.-«. 
Aubrey Mulberry and bos, of Frank- 
iln, Ohio, for a Tew days. 

The Patron-Teacher Association of 
the Mt. Zion school re-organized 
Thursday evening, Jan. 17th, and 
elected the following officers: 

Mrs. E. H. Surface, President 

Mrs. Henry Holtzworth Vice-Pres- 
dicnt. 

Mrs. Grover Rankin, Secretary. 

Mrs. E. H. Surface Asst. Secty. 

Mrs. Elmer Glacken Treasurer. 

Dr. E. L. Glacken Doorkeeper. 

New members were enrolled a:> 
f olows : 

Mrs. John Holtzworth. 

Mrs. Jane Tanner. 

Mrs. Maggie Glacken. 

Mr. Albert Tanner. 

Mr. Edward Marksberrv. 

Mr. W. E. Glacken. 

Mr. Gus Schadler. 

Mr. Elmer Schadler. 

Mr. G. S. Moore. 



Sheriff's Sale forTaxes 




Mrs. John Criswell of Nonpar^.l 
Park, spent Thursday in Union a 
attended the Missionary Society 

Mrs. Carl Anderson and daughter 
Alice Katherine, spent Monday af- 
ternoon with Mrs. Leslie Sorrell. 

J. D. Lucas attended the banquet 
given at the Gibson Hotel Fridiy 
night by the a Koch Real Estate Co. 

Llewellen Aylor and wife moved 
last week from Ed. Kraus' house to 
her parents Ben Nor'hcutt and wife, 
of near Devon. 

Arch Lucas and wife of Price pike, 
entertained Sunday their son Albert 
Lticas wife and daughters Jessie and 
Alice Sayre Lucas. 

The Aid Society of the Methodist 
church will have an all day meeting 
at Mrs. Chas. Fulton's residence on 
Shelby-st, Feb. 6th. 

Rev. C. C. Tanner wife and son, of 
Petersburg, passed through Florence 
Thursday enroute to her mother's 
farm near Richwood. 
^ Lee Craddock wife and son of 
Hebron, came over Wednesday night 
fcr several days visit with her par- 
ents, Woofl Stephens and family. 

Miss Ann Miller taught school a 
couple of days last week for Mrs. 
Stanley Luras, one of the inter- 
mediate teachers, who was suffering 
from having a tooth drawn. 

C. W. Myers and wife had as 
their Sunday guests Rev. J. H. Gar- 
bcr and family, L. E. Thompson and 
wife, J. P. Crouch and wife and 
Miss Hattie Cody, of Covington. 

Coi.gratulations are extended to 
Chas. Bradford and wife of Shelby 
ntreet upon the arrival of a 5-pound 
girl at their home, also to Homer 
Jones and wife out on Burlington 
pike upon the arrival of a daughtei 
at their home Jan. 25th. 



RABBIT HASH. 



l ire . Molly Merrick is v e iy ill. 



Walter Rector's family have tue, 
momps. 
[ V Blanch Williamson spent the wee!;- 

\ end at Oth Hubbard's. 

>. Wm. Stephens has been complain- 
ing with the ear ache. 
^JMis Myra Ryle visited Mrs. Ben* 
nie Cloro Saturday afternoon. 

The Ohio river has been past fer- 
rying here on account of ice in it. 

Saturday is ground-hog day. That 
is one day we hope will be cloudy all 
day. 
"V Rabbit Hash was welcomed wi$n a 
>*>>od sized crowd Saturday after- 
noon. 

J S. J. Stephens and family enter- 
tained Rev. Lewis Craig and family, 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Lucy Ryle spent Saturday af- 

Xternoon with her mother Mrs. Heatha 

^BtepherwK 

* Mrs. Kenneth Ryle, of Burlington, 

visited her sister Mrs. John Ryle, one 

day latt week. 

Tom Craddock is going to Minne- 
sota, where he will work for his 
brother-in-law. 

Dude Stephens and nephew Clifton 
Stephens, «pent Sunday with C. L. 
Stephens and wife. 

Ivan Ryle, Carroll Williamson and 
lfellbourue Louden enjoyed a few 
hours skating Sunday morning. 

The girls are advised to look !><• 
fat* they leap on leap year, but 
many vf th«m have been bakUf no 
i Ivng they are tired of It 



Florence. 



MrTVnrMrs. A. G. Creel had \| . Mr " William 5°>' le .«; a " ed °" H " 

\bert Beemon and family last Thur.s- 



their guests Sunday Russell Craddock ^ er - t Bee .™ 

«nd familv nf TTninn W n, £ ht - 



nd family, of Union. 

Rev. Geo. 'A. Royer called on Mrs. 
Jane Beemon and family and L. C. 
Acra and wife, Wednesday. 

Mrs. Harry Dinn and little daugh- 
ter Jessie Lee, spent Tuesday with 
her mother, Mrs. Annie Beemon. 

Mrs. W. L. Kirkpatrick and daugh- 
ter Georgie spent Sunday with her 
mother, Mrs. Jane Beemon and fam- 
ily. 

Miss Nellie Robbins has returned 
home after spending several day.? 
with her brother Albert Robbins and 
family. 

Mrs. Annie B emon and family 
had as their guests Sunday Samuel 
Blarkburn and family, of Hebron, 
and Will Drinkenburg and sister 
Rosa. 

Mr. and Mrs. August Drinkenburg 
Jr., and little son Irvin, and Mr 
and Mrs. Harry Barlow and daugly 
tor Ethel Mae, spent Sunday with 
A. G. Beemon and family. 



LIMABURG 

Marvin Kendall has been on thc- 
jck lisf. 

^Horner Jones and wife are the 
proud parents of a baby boy. 

Miss Ethel Lee Davis was the 
week-end guest of Mrs. Adain Sor- 
rell. 

Alliewilda Beemon called on her 
aunt last Thursday, Mrs. A. G. Be t- 
mon. 

Quite a few of the children in this 
neck of the woods have the whooping 
cough. 



Notice is hereby given that I will 
on Monday, February 4th, 1924, it 
being County Court day, between 
the hours of 10 o'clock a. m., and 
3 o'clock p. m., at the court house 
door in the town of Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., expos* to public 
sale for cash in hand, the following 
property or so much thereof as may 
be necessary to pay State, County 
and School taxes thereon, and unpaid 
for the year 1923, and the penalty, 
interest and costs thereon. 

For a complete description of the 
property see Tax Commissioner'* 
books for the year 192:4 at the Coun- 
ty Tax Commissioner'* office in the 
Cj>a rt House. 

B. B. HUME, 
Sheriff of Boone County. 
Amount of Tax 

Constance Precinct 

Humphrey, Lewis H. town lot $15.33 
Humphrey, Mrs Ruth, town lot $3.99 

Florence Precinct 

Gorres Alfred n. r. Lot No. 22 $4.63 
Kramer, Jno. n. r. lot No 68 $3.61 
Meyer, L J. n. r. lot No. 124 $4.08 
Stephens, Ben Est town lot $4.99 
Swim, Allen n. r. lot No. 21 $4.51 
Reliable Lmbr. Co. lot No. 7 Ken- 
ton-Boone $3.70 
Hamilton Precinct 
Walton, Oliver 30 acres land $16 Jt' 

Petersburg Precinct 
Edwards, Claude town lot $15.89 

Shinkle, Fritz 4 acres land $13.06 
Swing, Sarah Est., 12-a land $24.81 

Veron* Precinct 

Hageman, Pearl n. r. 14 acres $9.43 

I Napier, Chas. n. r. 10 town lots 

$12.01 

Vallandingham, K. K. n. r. 33 acres 

land $15.4 1 

NOTICE 
To Delinquent Members; of Breeders 
Mutual Fire and Lightning In- 
surance Company: 

Members who owe assessments arc 
hereby notified that unless such as- 
sessments are paid within the next 
thirty days legal steps will be taken 
to collect same. By order of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

r\ ft. ROUSE, 

Secretary. 



B e-a-Hill-Customer It Pays 

NOBETTER COFFEE 

A natlHfylng Full- Bodied Cup that just brims with flavor and 
flagrance. Nobetter Coffee i« better than most 45 and 50c 
grades. The best and most reasonable priced coffee in the ] 
United States today. 

Pound 



A Trial Convinces. 

Four or more pounds Bent Parcel post prepaid. 
THE SEASON'S CATCH 

New Lake Herring White Fish 

Packed in various sizes for your convenience 

5 Lb. Pail 80o; 10-Lb. Pall $1.25; It-Lb. Pail $1.78; I 
20-Lb. Pail $2.25; 40-Lb Pall $3.90; 100-Lb. Pall $8.00. | 

Order now have theth when you want them. 

■ ■ ■ — — — — ■ " ■■ -..■... - ' 

Lest You Forget 

""~ W E HAVE A FULL AND COMPLETE LINE O F 

"•«■• High Grade Field Seeds 

Write for Prices. HILL'S SEEDS DO GROW | 

Are You Going 10 Raise Chickens? 

We are agents for the famous 

Queen Incubators and Brooders 

Come In let us show you this wonderful .Machine 
Or write for catalogue and prices. 



-J Joe Sorrell was the guest of his 
daughter Mrs. Hermon Buckler th-j 
past week-end. 

Mr. Harold Beemon spent th> 
week-end with his parents, A. G. Bee- 
mon and wife. 

Miss Elizabeth Tanner spent one 
night last week with her grand- 
mother, Mrs. C. E. Beemon. 

Hubert Beemon and family and 
Adrain Sorrell and wife spent la it 
Thursday with Milton Beemon and 
wife. 



Mr. 

*kth 

nthVj 



m. " j i w ~ wTi ' j «\ "* John Dickerson, who has been on 
Mr and Mrs. Will Snyder, Mr\ the sick list for the past week, is 

and Mrs. H. L. Tanner, Mr. and Wte better 

Mrs. L C. Acra, Mrs. Annie Bee- > Mrs. Alma Head and Mrs. Nannie 



mon, Miss Minnie Beemon, Shelby 
Clinton and James Beemon enjoyed 
a pleasant evening last week with 
Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Ross. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Snyder enter- 
tained one evening last week Mr. 
and Mrs. L. C. Acra, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. L. Tanner, Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Ross, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Barlow 
and daughter Ethel Mae, Mrs. Annie 
Beemon, Miss Minnie Beemon, Shel- 
by Clinton and James Beemon. 



HEBRON. 

A dance was given last Friday 
night at the I. O. O. F. hall. 

Charles Garnett has been in a ser- 
ious condition for several weeks. 

■ Mr s . Chester Ande r son is enter- 
taining her sister, of New Baltimore, 
Ohio. 

We are glad to report Mrs. Stan- 

* ley Graves abole to be about in her 
Toom. 

»Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Beemon enter- 
tained a few of their friends last 
'Friday night. % 

Mrs. Ezra Aylor has been confin- 
ed to her> room for several weeks 
with a severe cold. 

Grandpa and Barney Googles at- 
tended a theater in Covington, last 
Sunday night. Now guess who they 

• are. „ •. « 

Friends here of Miss Delilah Flor- 
ence were surprised to hear of her 
marriage last Saturday to Mr. Win- 
field Scott, of Covington. 

The many friends and relatives 
here were shocked to hear of Mrs. 
Leonard Crigler (nee Jane Helm) 
being paralyzed last Tuesday, and 
has been in a serious condition ever 
since. 



UNION. 

Mrs. Ada Bachelor spent Sunduy 
with Mrs. Owen Blankenbeker. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Jones spent 
Sunday with Mrs. Belle Jones. 

Rev. Garber and family spent 
Sunday with C. W. Myers and wife. 

James Head and wife entertained 

the young folks with a dance Friday 

ight 



Holtzworth were shopping in the 
city, Monday. 

Jas. Head and wife entertained J. 
Bristow and wife and daughter Anna 
Mae at dinner Sunday. 



NOTICE. 



Honor Roll of Primary Grades of 
Union Graded School: 
4th Grade— 

Jamfea Bristow. 

Hattie Mae Carpenter. 

Elaine Dickerson. 

Virginia Jones. 

Forest Marsh. 

Pauline Shields. 
3rd Grade— 

J. M. Huey. 

Patsy Huey. 

Marie Head. 

Nelljo Hicks. 

Joseph Jones. 

Mary Belle Bristow. 

Harry Glenn Tickerson. 

Evelyn Marsh. 

Mabel Wilson. 
2nd Grade — 

Charley Kelley. 

Coello Carpenter. 
1st Grade — 

Elsie Garrison. 

Allen Kelley. 

Aubra Knox. 
Ira Jones' name was omitted from 
lest month's roll by mistake. 



BIG BONE. 

The young people are enjoying the 
fine skating. 

Lester Moore is with home folks 
for a few days. 

Omer Kite is some what improved 
at this writing. 

J. J. Huffman, sent some nice pork- 

*vetk er8 10 the city Fr, 4*y- 

\ Our young pedple attended a party 
u\ Wm. Black's Friday night. 
''John Binder, Sr., and Chas. Jones 
made a business trip to Ludlow, last 
Monday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Jones are en- 
tertaining a nine pound boy at the 
home of her father. 



We are now starting another class 
of borrowers for loans from the Fed- 
eral Land Bank. Any borrower dV 
siring a loan will please call and fill 
out formal application a* *,• <-xp«rt Mrs. Richard Dwenke accompanied 
to close this clans within 80 days. \ her sister-in-law who is nicely local 

lit Boone County National Farn ^> d In Cincinnati, home. 

a r ■- l MA*a A «" . tatl0n i Hrady Anderson and wife were 

A. II KENAK.ER, Secty-Treas. 

A Hurhngton, Ky 



ailed to !<awrenceburg, Ind., by the night and Friday m Frankfort 



death of his brother Sam. 



HAVING GRADUATED 

FROM THE 
RAHE AUTO & TRAC- 
TOR SCHOOL 
Cincinnati, 
I AM NOW 
AT WOODWARD'S 
GARAGE AT DEVON, 
PREPARED 

TO DO 

FIRST-CLASS WORK 

on all makes of 

MOTOR CARS. 

cAuthorized 
FORD AGENT. 
Give me a call 
R. F. WOODWARD- 



NOTICE. 



All persons indebted to the estate 
of J. J. Stephens, deceased, must 
come forward and settle at once, and 
those having claims against said es- 
tate must present them properly 
proven according to law to the un- 
dersigned L. L. STEPHENS. 

Burlington, Ky. 



SELECTING AND TESTING OF 
RED CLOVER RECOMMENDED 

Much of the present difficulty ex- 
perienced in getting a good stand of 
red clover may be overcome simply 
by the use of seed of good quali;: - 
and germination, says the United 
States Department of Agriculture. A 
bright fresh-looking lot of red clover 
seed will usually germinate pretty 
well, but it is so easy to test the 
germination in advance that there is 
little excuse for sowing poor seed. 

If 100 or 200 average seeds are 
counted out and laid on a plate be- 
tween pieces of moist cloth or blot 
ting paper and the plate set away in 
a room where the temperature is 6j» 
degrees to 80 degrees F., the seeds 
will begin to sprout in three or of ur 
days, and in a week the value of the 
seed so far as germination is con- 
cerned can be definitely determined. 
The germination of clover seed even 
when the sample is good, will de- 
pend somewhat on the number of 
hard seeds present A sample of good 
seed should test something ike 90 per 
cent, with at east several of the re- 
maining seeds hard at the close of 
the 10-day test period. 

However, even if the germination 
of seed is good great care should be 
taken to find out if possible Wuero 
the seed was grown, since the work 
of i£he department has also show-i 
that red clover grown in Italy is not 
adapted to most of the United States 
and should not be used in the eastern 
United States. The only way to pro- 
vent getting Italian seed is to buy 
from a reliable firm or organisation 
and to inslnt that you do not waul 
Italian seed. 

Omer Porta? «p«-nt lu*t Thursday 



business. 



on 



MAKES DELICIOUS ROLLS, BISCUIT AND BREAD 

OUR GEM FLOUR 

$6.25 



HIGH GRADE WINTER PATENT. - 
2—98 Pound Bags Delivered to your 
Station for 



Northern Kentucky's } aWe c ed^ 




BcA Mill Customer 
— It P*y» — 



Aocers- Seednsai 
,, Mfafeale«*fctsil 

fnnniMmirnh^ ^ 



27- 29 R«« «r -an W 7» sr cow 

Ar. OmatH &n>r — Sovr* AOtt 



uuh'.uuu; 

cu.nr. fi 

vtMr I 
!!II!M.'IIMK 



s 

3 



** 
& 



VULCANIZING. 

— ■ *— — • 

Complete Hneot Goodyear, Goodrich and Kelly- ^J 

Springfield Tires and Tubes, good Grade of Auto- (f\ 

mobile and Tractor Oils and Greases. ft 

Auto Accessories kept in stock. «^ 

GEORGE PORfER, * 

BURLINGTON, KY. S 



Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Feb. 2nd 

"The Man From Glengary" 

BY RALPH CONNER. 

"PAT'S PATENT" 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 

Friday Ni ht, Feb. 1st 



• — 



CHILDREN 10c. : : ADULTS 25c 
War Tax Included V egin promptly at 7:30 

J! 



GREAT— 

Reduction Sale 

NOT A MAKE BELIEVE BUT AN HONEST 
TO GOODNESS SALE. PRICES-REDUC- 
ED ON ALL 

SUIT8 AND OVERCOATS 

Maekinaws, Coat Swtattrt, Pullovers, Kdm 
Pantt and Corduroy Goods. 

If you are in need of clothing take advantage of the bar- 
gains we are offering in this aale. 



Selmar Wachs 



605 Madison Avenue, 



COV INGTON, KY. 



■an 



BOONE COOJT 



3BCORDF. R 



PAGE 



Guaranteed Profits 

Ce-re-a-lia Sweets produce* more milk, more butter fat, 
for Uttfud nit than any other dairy feed or combination 
of graim you can buy or raise. 

This it a pretty strong statement. And because it is a 
strong statement, we are willing to back it up. Read the 
guarantee below. It means just what it says, without any 
ifs or andf about it. Men milk or better milk or every 
cent of your money back on our trial offer. 



Ce-re-a-lia Sweets never cakes or hardens, 
cows do relish it! 

SOLD BY 



And how the 



EARLY * DANIEL, Covington, Ky 
EARLY i DANIEL, Eritnotr, Xy 



Four U)ceks /W 

Sheets for f°» r £ tetter it"*- 
aSS^^HTr lunfact every *■* 

oT^ our moncy ( 



THE TUXEDO 
LINE OF FEEDS 

Ce-re-» lla 8werts 
Dairy Tuxedo 
Tuxedo Chop 

-llofl 

Tuxedo Pigeon Peed 

Tuxedo Egg Ma.;h 

Tuxedo Scratch 

Tuxedo ChicU 

Tuxedo Buttermilk 

Starter and Growing 

Mash 

Tuxedo Developer 

etc. 



Ce-re-a-lia 
Sweets 



World's Safest and Soundest 

Security 

United States Treasury Savings Certificates For Small Investors. 

BY DENIS DONOHOE. 

[Bualnen Editor of San Francisco (Cal.) Examiner,] 

THIS article le auaToaaau primarily 
to the small Investor — to the 
man or woman of moderate means 
who Is seeking to Improve his or h«r 
#o»ditlon by eystematlo envlng. 

la preparing this article, the writer 
ease has in mind the newcomer from 
far-rent Europe, who may be at a 
sbs* la this new land how to laveet 
lit enrplaa wages where the principal 
wfll h« eocene beyond peradventnre 
at • doubt, and where hie money will 
earn a Mbaral interact. 

Maw cade 8am, the father of a 
**m*r ■■tracing mora than 110,900,- 
•#• human beings, knit together Into 
e«* vaat economic entity, has pro- 
vided Cor each and every member of 
has great household the soundest, the 
sweat, and the safest Investment In 
the whole wide world. This ideal se- 
dnrity is the TREASURY SAVINGS 
flggftTIFICATE. 

Behind this piece of paper, en- 
graved with the solemn promise of 
ear government, stands the United 
Btatee of America, In all its might 
and majesty, with all the collective 
wealth of all the inhabitants of this 
great republic, which, according to 
she most recent estimate means $360,- 
000,000,000 — a sum so inconceivably 
vast that the human brain reels when 
contemplating it. 

Indeed there is no bond, no secur- 
ity, issued by any other nation today, 
at to be mentioned in the same breath 
with this sacred obligation of the 
United States, guaranteed by the 
idedse of our national good faith and 
honor, backed toy wealth incalculably 
greater than that of any other power 
en earth. 

The United States government 
makes it very easy for anyone to buy 
tale Ideal security. These Treasury 
Barings Certificates are issued in de- 
nominations of $25, $100 and 11,000 
each, and are sold on a discount basis 
at $20. (80 and $800, respectively, and 
tmey" can be purchased at any poet- 



office 

■ These Certificates mature In Ave 
years from the date of issue, and 
bear 4H per cent interest compound- 
ad semi-annually — that la to say, add- 
ed to the purchase price of the Car- 
ttftcate. 

- It Is for this reason that tor $20 
one can buy a Certificate (in Itself a 
Bnlted States bond) which is, ax- 
changeable for $25 in cash at the end 
at five years, without any if, or and, 
about it, and with all red tape elim- 
inated. The interest at 44 per cent 
compounded semi-annually makes ths 
difference In valae, and the same is 
true of the $100 and the $1,000 de- 
nominations. 

Somebody may say: But suppose I 
need my money before the five years 
expire? 

Uncle Sam has provided for that 
contingency also. The purchaser. of 
ens of these Certificates can get his 
ear her money btfck with Interest at 
any Ume. The only difference le that 
the Interest Is then computed at 2% 
far cent compounded semi-annually, 
not 4H per cent. If held to maturity, 
that Is to say, five years, the full in- 



terest at i\k per cent compounded 
semi-annually is added to the pur- 
chase price of the Treasury Certifi- 
cate; Interest is thus paid upon In- 
terest, because of the semi-annual 
compounding feature. 

Bnt someone will say: Suppose I 
lose my Cert ifl cats, or It la stolen T 

Uncle Sam, in bis provident care 
of his big family, has provided tor 
that contingency also, for every Cer- 
tificate Is registered at the Treasury 
Department In Wasfalagton. This pro- 
tects the owner against loss or theft 

Again someone may aak the ques- 
tion whether income tax Is not col- 
lectatole on this ideal investment. 
The answer Is NO. Not only are 
these Treasury Savings Certificates 
exempt from the normal federal In- 
come tax, but from all state, county 
and local taxation, except that, in the 
event of death, they are subject to 
the inheritance and estate taxes. 

Here is a form of investment that 
ia not subject to market manipulation 
or fluctuation in price, but lncreaees 
in value every month you hold it. The 
only restriction that Uncle Sam puts 
on his wonderfully attractive offer is 
that no one is allowed to hold more 
than $5,000 maturity value of any one 
aeries of these Treasury Savings Cer- 
tificates. A new series is issued for 
each calendar year. 

This restriction should not preclude 
a person of moderate means from 
buying the soundest Investment in 
the world— a Treasury Savings Cer- 
tificate of the United States of Amer- 
ica, and it is the person of moderate 
means whom Uncle Sam bad in. view 
when he thought out this perfect plan 
for assuring the safety of the little 
fellow's savings. 

To the foreign-born man or woman 
who has sought this land of freedom 
for the opportunity it offers to better 
his or her condition in life, these 
Treasury Savings Certificates should 
exercise an irresistible appeal. 

of the Old 



school 



In the stem 
World, whence the prospective citi- 
zen came, thrifty habits not Infre- 
quently were his only heritage. In 
those lands, where frugality too often 
has been enforced by rigorous neces- 
sity, and the faces of the poor have 
been ground into the duet of cen- 
turies tor the support of despotic mil- 
itarism, government securities have 
always been a favored investment for 
savings. 

Hera In America, where the oppor- 
tunity le given to every human being 
to work out hie destiny freely and 
fully, our government has provided 
for citlsens and aliens alike, a form 
of Investment incalculably sounder 
and safer than any security ever is- 
sued by any European government 
since the world began. 

To these future citlsens from over- 
seas the writer would say, take your 
first step in Americanism by invest- 
ing your surplus funds earned here in 
American securities. Of these none 
Is better, none is safer, none is surer 
of income yield, than the TREASURY 
SAVINGS CERTIFICATE issued by 
the government of the United States. 



Subscribe For The Recorder $1.50 per year 

tend Our Advertisement* <m.<i Pruflt ov 






DOINGS IN KENTUCKY 

Louisville, Ky. — The first conflict 
between those who are urging Ken- 
tucky to move forward with a great 
stride through issuance of $75,000,- 
000 in bonds to pay for roads and 
improvements that are needed and 
those who would mark time and 
"pay as you go" came this week 
when Governor W. J. Fields, leader 
of the "forward looking" element, 
condemned the action of the State 
Efficiencp in making a supplemental 
report which is an argument against 
if" Hond issue. 

"Not a report, but a clever, well- 
planned deceptive argument against 
the bond issue bill" were the words 
in which the Governor expressed h>: 
opinion of the Efficiency Commis- 
sion's work. 

The Governor challenged the righc 
of the commission to use their of- 

A ' - - -a 

on the bond issuer 

The report of the commission took 
a stand for the "pay as you go" plan 
and presented arguments to show 
why bonds should not be issued. One 
contention was that more roads cat 
be built from current revenues in 
eight years than in we years with 
bonds. 

The commission is composed of 
Catesbp Spears, of Paris; Thomas 0. 
Turner, of Cadiz; Gabe C. Wharton 
of Springfield and John Stoll, Lex- 
ington. The vote to present this 
supplemental report to the Governor 
and the Legislature was over the pro- 
test of Turner. 

The Governor called attention to 
the fact that in the campaign botn 
parties pledged themselves to the 
submission of a bond issue for the 
arods. He scored the commission as 
having "remained silent until the last 
hours of the campaign, when the 
measure is nearing a vote in the Leg- 
islature with the apparent hope that 
the proponents of the bond issue will 
not- have time to combat its argu- 
ments." 



Republican Convention. 

The Republicans ot Boone County are requested to 
meet in mass convention at Burfington, Saturday, Februa- 
ry 9th, at one o'clock, tor the purpose of selecting delegates 
to attend the District Convention at Covington, and the 
State Convention at Louisville. 

A. R. EDWARDS, Chairman County Committee. 



REGULATING BUSINESS 



William Jennings Bryan returned 
to thescene of his memorable attack 
on the theory of evolution, made in 
the Assembly of 1922, when evolu- 
tion first became a subject for legis- 
lation and a bill forbidding its teach- 
ing in the schools of the state miss- 
ed by one vote. Mr. Bryan aldressed 
the Legislature and gave his opinion 
of those who "linlr v.ian in blood "re- 
lationship with animals" with the 
customary Bryan displap of descri,. 
tive language. Mr. Bryan also as 
sailed President Coolidge, whom he 
described as the "most reactionary" 
President the nation has ever had. 



1 1> 



Governor Field's long-awaited ap- 
pointment of the State* Highway 
Commission brought general ap- 
proval. The names of the four he 
has selected go to the Senate Mon- 
day for confirmation. The two Demo- 
crats were known, the Governor hav- 
ing announced during the campaign 
that he would name W. C. Montgom- 
ery, of Elicabethtown, as Chairman. 
The appoinement of Richard W. 
Owen, of Owensboro, also has been a 
certainty. W. C. Hanna, of Shelby- 
ville, former Commissioner of Agri- 
culture, and E. S. Helburn, of Mid- 
dlesboro, . both leading Republicans, 
represent their party on the commis- 
sion. The geographical selection is 
fortunate. Mr. Owen is acquainted 
with the interests of Western Ken- 
tucky, while Mr. Helburn is thor- 
oughly familiar with the road prob- 
lems of the mountain district. Mr. 
Hanna, as Commissioner of Agricul- 
ture, gained valuable information as 
to the farmer's requirement. Mr. 
Montgomery's high qualifications for 
the position of Chairman were one 
of the strong arguments. 



Establishing a new County is the 
pleasure that is either proposed or 
carried through at every session of 
the legislature and the present Gen- 
eral Assembly has its new County 
shaping. It is to be a Democratic 
County and it is to be named either 
Fields or Wilson. 

Corbin, a railroad center in the 
mountains, with 11,000 population is 
to be the county seat and the County 
is to be made from portions of five 
present counties in the western part 



of the Eleventh Congressional Dis 
trict: Whitley, Laurel, Knox, Mr- 
Creary and Pulaski. McCreary is a 
recently established county, its his- 
tory dating back only 15 years. By 
taking slices from these five, Wilson 
or Fields county, as the name may 
prove, will start life with 406 square 
miles and a population of 22,000 anj 
tnere are only 29 count-'es in Ken- 
tucky that are larger. 

T. B. Culton and Judge John A. 
Hart, of Corbin, are backing the new 
county and have been in Frankfort 
urging its right to existence. One of 
their strongest claims is that 2,000 
Democratic voters could not vote 
the 1923 election because they were 
so far distant from the county seat. 

Corbin came into fame during the 
railroad strike of 1923 when it devel- 
oped that it was the neck of the traf- 
fic bottle through which passed traf- 
fic North and South. When the neck 
of the bottle became jammed by the 
strike, the entiso country awoke to 
the importance of CobinhhdddddhFq 
the importance of Corbin. 

Some folks in Burlington claim 
they have not broken any of their 
New Year resolutions yet, but they 
may be among thoaa who never make 
any. 



No less an authority than Thomas 
R. Marshall, former vice-president 
of the United States, told a conven- 
tion of insurance men that publicity 
was the only antidote for meddle- 
some regulatory legislation. 

"z rei-o-fw^AH the tendency of leg- 
islatures and the congress to regu- 
late in every possible way, all class. 
e3 of business. 

People are beginning to react un 
fovorably to it. State and federal 
governments have meddled in pri- 
vate business so Ion 4 that they are 
no longer able to ettend to their 
cwn. 

There are just two kinds of men 
in the world. One kind is honest and 
the other kind is dishonest. The lat- 
ter should be sent to the penitent- 
iary and the former should be per- 
mitted to conduct their business un 



TAKE FARM INVENTORY NOW 



Lexington, Ky. — Thousands of Ky. 
farmers will keep complete accounts 
this year for. the first time accord- 
ing to statement made by W. D. 
Nic*<\ls of the Department of Econ- 
omics, Kentucky College of Agricul- 
ture. He bclkwer ' ***s: and more 
Kentuckp farmers are realizing that 
farming is a business and that it re 
spends to business methods. Keeping 
of farm records furnishes the only 
means by which they can study thdir 
farm business and find the weak 
spots in their farming systems. 

"A complete farm account," Mr. 
Nichols continues, "consists if a farm 
inventory, a record of the acreage 
and yield of all crops and a v ^ecord 
of all farm receipts and expens.,, 
The first step in starting a farm ac- 
count and the most important re 
cord in it is the inventory. This con 



molested. In this manner, the ' sists of an itemized list of all farm 



states and federal government can 
deal with dishonest business without 
trying to rule all business regardless 
of whether it is good or bad. 

Mr. Marshall's refrence to the in- 
surance business recalls that the 
state of Wisconsin has gone into the 
life insurance business on a whole- 
sale scale. 

For ten years, the state has had 



property, opposite each item of. which 
is placed its value. Without the in- 
ventory it is impossible for the far- 
mer to determine his profits for the 
year or what he is actually worth 
and for the time spent this record 
will furnish more useful information 
thnn any other the farmer can 
keep. 

Detailed inventories should b 



» *.. mi jcoio, nie sutie nas nau -"- ~ w^«w»w« ouuuw u; 

a provision for insuring peope, but ' ma de of land and buildings, live 



no one but state employees took it 
seriously. 

ihere might not be so much ob- 
jection, if the State stopped at life 
insurance. But, if the people don't 
o^er a protest to th's practice stat.-s 
will be peddling milk some day. 



stock, machinery and equipment and 
growing crops. Only a few hours, us 
ually two or four on most farms, is 
required to do this. The figures used 
in closing one year's account are used 
in opening the next year's account so 
it is necessary to take the inventory" 



It is aigueu Dy proponents of the ' ? nly once a y ear - Once started, the 
rtate life 



insurance scheme thai 
agents' commissions and office rent 
are saved lecause the business if 
djne in the state house. Furthermore 
it is argiiori, the state's general fund 
is back of the insured. 

But did it ever occur to those w'o 
are so anxious to put the state an I 
government into business, that tht 
business might be mismanaged? T » 
such an event, the state's genera' 
fund, is made up of money collected 
as taxes from the people's regardless 
of wherW thev Ho'd a state inau^ 
ance policy, would be drawn on to 
pay the loss. 

THE HOME MARKET 



If freight rates are such a big 



NONPARIEL PARK 

Miss Beatrice Cahill has measles. 

M. G. Martin spent Monday m 
Covington. 

Paul and Wm, Aydelotte have a 
new Durant machine. 

The children of Gordon Lail and 
wife have whooping cough. 

Robert Miller was calling on Miss 
Eva Renaker Sunday evening. 

Jake Lohline has been quite sicic 
the past three weeks at home. 

Mrs. Lewis Houston who has been 
'.ill is improving and able to be out 
again. 

_j Miss Mary Conrad has been quite 
ill with a case of measles the past 
week. 

J. G. Meinger, of Covington, spent 
the week-end with Joe Baxter and 
family. 

Miss Minnie Robinson, of Rich- 
wood spent Sunday with Miss Eva 
Renaker. 

Jack Renaker, of Covington, call- 
ed on friends in Florence, Honda;.- 
afternoon. __ 

Mrs. Shelley Aylor and children 
spent Wednesday with L. P. Aylor 
and family. 

Mr. and Mrs. G K. Kindafdy of 
Erlanger, spent Monday in Florence 
on business. 

Miss Lillian Butler is boarding 
with Dr. T. B. Castleman and family 
and attending school. 

Miss Bridget Carey has been quite 
ill. Mrs. Chas. Scott has been nurs- 
ing her the past week. 

Roy Butler spent Saturday and 

nday with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Butler, of Hathaway.. 

The many friends here regret to 
hear of Mrs. Agness Walton being 
very ill at her home on Price pike. 

James Rice and wife, of the Dixie 
Highway, are rejoiced oyer the arriv- 
ai of a fine baby boy since last week. 

Miss Myrtle Stephens of Shelby 
street,. entertained a number of her 
friends Friday evening with a Rook 
party. 

Mr. and Mrs. Homer Jones (nee 
Pansy Craven) are rejoiced over the 
arrival of a fine baby boy since last 
week. 

Tom Nead and wife had a radio 
installed in their home last week. 
Tom beieves in keeping up with the 
aimes. 

\j. G. Renaker and wife, Bob Mil- 
ler and Miss Eva Renaker attended 
the theater Saturday evening in Cin- 
cinnati. 

Frank Sayre, of Pittsburg, Penu., 
wiJJ Arrive home Feb. 1 t- :pcr.d a 
month with his parents or. arrfl Mrp. 



inventory should be made at the same 
time each year. 

There are numerous advantages to 
be gained from the practice of mak- 
ing an annual inventory^ It famish- 
es a time to round up the year's bus- 
iness. If all accounts owed by and F.L. Sayre 

due- tc the farmer are not settled, it Mrs. Lou Olliver, of Covington, 
is £ the interest of all concerend spent Wednesday and Thursday with 
to know the exact amount of each Mrs. J. G. Renaker of the Dixie 



item It furnishes a good oppor- 
tu.-.ity to call home any tools" oi- 
equipment loaned to neighbors anc* 
gives the farmer a good excuse to 
aak for payment of overdue accounts 
or notes. But the greatest advantage 
is that with this information at hand 
the farmer can easily find out what 
he is worth above all indebtedness, 
and he has something to work with in 



.» i.e. gui. jaws me aucn a Dig u- „«„_.„ . , ° . ----- — ~ "■ mi. unu airs, narry oiepnena 01 

item in the cost of farm produce, it ELEEu to make ■* bn «ness more Union pike, have returned home after 



is clearly up to the producers to de 
velop the home market and elimina*. : 
the railroad freight charges. 

City and town residents are ask-:d 
to buy the produce from the farms 
of their district as a atter of com- 
munity loyality, and for their own 
good as well, because a dollar spent 
at home is a dollar more in circula- 
tion in the local trade than if it were 
spent away from your home. 

The producer will get better results 
in the movement to win the support , 
of the people of his own community! 



\ a delightful visit with their daughter 



The ideal time for taking the in- Sjf Price Hill, 
ventory is the Utter part of January \ P j om_u. j •* 
or the first part of February. Right Ed ' ShmklC and W,£e ' ' 
now is the time to start" 



POULTRY MEETING 



The Boone County Poultry Assoc- 
iation held their second meeting of 
the year, Tuesday of last week an i 
finished plans for the business of the 
year. 



The County Agent gave a short 
if he will observe the methods of the taIk on "The Value of Pure Bred 
concerns that market foed products p °u J try," and discussed methods of 
and imitate them. handling the poultry work with the 

He will note that cleanliness and J . r » Apiculture Clubs. The Assoc 
attractiveness of the package is one t ' on a 8Teed to abandoned the pi 
of the salient features, and that e.'- used ,ast y ear an d adopt one by 
ery effort is made to please the cus- wn i cn the people supplying the eggs 
tomer. j would be paid cash for their eggs 



He will also note that the large ' and the Boy or Girl taking the eggs 



LOWER GUNPOWDER 

Lou Williamson has a new Ford 
rdndster. 

anly Ryle and wife spent Sun- 
^ t,... „, ou ww "1*1. — , "".--■' "* ""* «-""«» <•■•«: einpj d'iy with Oth Hubbard and wife. 

handlers of food products use adver- could elthe r pay cash for them ov Boin to Charles H Jones and wife 
tising space freely and bring to the return six pounds of poultry at the (nee Binder) a boy Jan 24th 
realization of the customer that they fal1 sale. Under this plan the Club Wm, Rlack and wife gave 
have a product that is worth the members need not return their goo 1] young folks a dance Friday night. 

money. K,""^' u"* "" retUrn other »* le - Ho ™ rd J- Aplor, who has spent 

Although loyalty to the home com- ab,e Poultry. a few months in Fi orida> hag ^t^. 

munity should figure in the average | Arrangements were made to njt td home. 

buyer's calculations, he is largely out an advertising booklet which wHl Mrs. Maud Satchwell, who was in- 
governed by his likes and dislikes and better put the products of the As- J«wed from breaking through a floor 
his tastes for certain brands of food 3. j sociation before their customers.' \ recovering slowly. 

The men and women who produce Mrs. B. E. Aylor was also elected -^Miss Iva Ree Sebree spent 
the food that we eat will find a ready' as representative t.n the State Pou4~ week-end with her cousin Mfw 



market at home if they will take tha i try meeting at Lexington, on Jan. 



pains to get it. A little special effort 
is required, and a study of the needs 
and wants of the customers. 

THE PROBLEMS OF LIVING 



A college professor on the Pacific 
coast told an audience of school 
teachers that the greatest human 
problem ia the orld today is the 
problem of living together 

But is it such a problem after all? 
Is it not simple unless we make it 
complex? 

The science of living together, is, 
after all, not a science at all. 

It is friendliness. Nothing more. 

People who dwerf in peace and 
happiness are friendly people. They 
make friends by being friends to oth- 
ers. 

There is no deep secret about it. 
Reduced to its simpest terms, living 



day Jan. 28th. 

BOONE COUNTY FLOCK 

MAKES GOOD AVERAGE 

The flock of Rhode Island Rads 
owned by Mrs. Cecil Gaines, consist 
ing of 72 hens and pullets, laid 640 
eggs during the month of December. 
This makes an average of 8.8 eggs 
per hen. 

The. highest flock average of the 



R. I. Reds in the state Egg Laying na Ay,or and Miss Ruth Cleek 
Contest averaged 11.3 and the next 
flock 8.5 eggs per hen, or a little less 
than Mrs. Gaines' flock. 



Highway. 

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Bradford (nee 
Ruba Corbin) are rejoiced since last 
Thursday over the arrival of a fine 
baby girl. 

Dick German of Louisville, for- 
merly of Florence, died and waa in- 
terred in Florence cemetery Monday 
afternoon. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Stephens of 



f Big 

Bone, tpent the week-end with her 

parents, Geo. Smith and wife, of 
the Layne Farm. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. K. Kindard, of 
Erlanger, had for guests Sunday af- 
ternoon Mr. and Mrs. Russell Mit- 
chell and Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe 
Bryant. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hampton, of 
Shelby-st., entertained Sunday even- 
ing at their home Mr. and Mrs. Chas. 
Fulton, Mr. and Mrs. Russell Mitchell 
and Mr. and Mrs. M. G. Martin. 



Sheryl Ryle, of East Bend. 



24 ^- Ny - f.d. Shinkle and wife spent the 

Plans were also arranged for thieV week-t.nd with her parents, Mr a«d 
first shipment of 1,000 White Le t ;- "Mrs Geo. Smith of Nonpariel Park 
horn eggs which went out on Mon- -^ " 



F. H. Sebree attended the meet- 
ing of the Boone County Poutry As- 
sociation at Burlington, ast Tues- 
day. 

sociation at Burlington, last Tuea- 
mcpsago Saturday evening to come 
to the Lome of her father, William 
Black, of Buffalo Ridge immediately. 
AIi*s Anna Hamilton entertained 
her friends with a party Thursday 
nU'ht Ihose present were Ed. and 
Garfield Hamilton, Jack Purdee, An- 



CONSTANCE. 

Saturday morning the thermometer 
registered two below zero. 

The Box Social given by the La- 



£™Z",^° k C 2l t * iM more «"»»>«> Aid Society J.n. 1Mb, waa 



practicing friendliness to everyone, 
never harboring hatred and never 
questioning the motives of others. 



Scotland and Wales put together. 
Only a little while ago when men 
now in the fifties were startiwr out 

ia* 1i#A «■«... 11 a . 



i^ow and then, perhaps, you may 1 m life, you could have bought the 
find some perverse souls who refuse ' original telephone stock at your own 
to permit you to practice the art of price. It waa called "an interesting 



friendliness on them. 

But in the long run, being friend- 
ly will overcome barriers that coull 
not otherwise be scaled. 



toy." 

In a few more weeks there will be 
a moving ..round among the tenants. 



Remember there is regular church 
services at the church morning and 
e<.cning and Sunday school at half 
past nine o'clock. They are going to 
build a new church here. 

The American people may not 
know the words of the national 
anthem, but some people feel it ia 
sufficient to know the base ball rulei. 



_52j 




*AfcE FOUR 



-w^" 



-"•* 



BOONE COUN 



WE WERE ALL CREATED ALIKE. 



Maker unci' asked i 

what in his opinion, 

the solution 



A 



u 



I i 



I I • ■ real 1 1 tllh Of 

hi pi ■ hlcm Bui i in. - 

■ . and mm i< i iuc i 
lucal ion, educat ion 
11 •< Hw of all the dignity 
| .' ol only 'or negroes bul 

tot white men. Tlie white man, south 
and north, needs it quite a> much as 
! hi 1 fv'ottd man. 

And this is exactly tin- program 

.' • he Mew sootht rn .-■t.'i.'e-manship 

'ill, -c -'ise sot. nt rneis i ,^f forget 

ti. ■ di- ouiagenic .ts am. eonipLx. 

the mv" '■> proMt**h. forgot 



tie 



ceo their disagl cement. . 

*t 01 k .ni preset t pi obleriis 

ipne iii 01 oourawoii aim 



am 



CO "o 
he i!,v ( v 
miliary. 

Whether we Me it >r TO! tin 
wboh nation (indeed the Whole, 
world) is tied by unbreakable bond.; 
to it;- negroes, its Chinamen, ;t< 
slumdwellers, us thieves, its murder- 
ers, its prostitutes. 

We cannot elevate ourselves b 



BABY HEALTH TALKS 

'(By Dr. Juanito McF. Jenningv 
A*tistant Director Bureau of Child 
Hygiene, State Board of Htalth of 
Kentucky. ) 

One out of every three ir.en whfl 
I came before the examining boar! 
, weii refused admission to army ser- 
I vice hoeause of physical defec' 
' childhood many of these defers 
could have been prevented or cm - 
reeled but lack of care resulted in a 
large number of American boys un- 
fit for war service. In Kentucky Cl- 
out of every 1,000 babies born die 
during the first year of life. The Bu- 
reau of Child Health is endeavoring 
to lower this high rate and to assist 
mothers in rearing chidren who wi'l 
be physically fit and able to take 
their places as useful and efficient 
citizens. 

With this object in view ChiM 
Health Centers have heen permanent- 
ly established in the following coun- 
ties: Christian, Webster, Davieso, 
Grayson, Mart, Taylor, Nelson, Shel- 
by Henry, Mercer, Boyle, Lincoln 
Pulaski, Whitley, Knox, Bell, Har 
Ian, Letcher, Pike, Montgomery, 
Madison, Clark, Woodford Scott 




When 
they 

Cough 



Commissioner's Sale. 



driving them back either with batrc~.it Kenton, Mason, Fayette, Jefferson, 
ta viuleme o: neglect; but only tu K".!uastle, Muhlonburg, and Fulton. 
hrihgi nit them forward; by service. Child Health Centers give to moi:.- 
The diva! Teacher never preached ! erg the opportunity of a physical ex- 
the flat quality ol men. social or animation of children under 6 years, 
otherwise, He gave mankind n work I The physician in charge instructs 
ing principle by means of which, I the lupthers regarding the health hab- 
Lteing so different, some white, some its of children and the best methods 
black, some yellow, some old, somerof keeping them well. Children ar.- 
young, sin men, some women, some I weighed monthly and mothers are 



accomplished, some stupid — mankind 

could, after all live together in har- 
mony and develop itself to the ut- 
most possibility . 

And that principle was the Goldi n 
Rule, It is the least sentimental, 
the most profoundly practical teach- 
ing known to men. 

We were all craated alike and a'l 
go to the same end. 



As a result of several months of 
investigation and study by experts of. 
the Post Office Department, Post- 
master General New today issued the 
first definite concise and complete 
program that has ever been put oiu 
by the Department for the mailing, 
transmission and delivery of newspa- 
pers. 

This: order is most important. It i.- 
for reaching . It givis the same ex- 
pedition to newspapers a- is airordiM 
*o first class mail. 

The order is the result of pains 
taking effort on the part of the Po-*t 
Office inspectors, under the directi ««i 
•if First Assistant Postmaster Gen 



told whether they are growing and 
gaining as uwy should. The commun- 
ity nurse advises mothers about the 
feeding el babies and the prepar 
Hon of the first foods— if necessary, 
follow up visits are made to th.' 
homes and further instructions hvv 
given mothers. After the first visit 
mothers are anxious to return for 
the monthly weighing of their chil- 
dren for they soon realize that a 
steady, progressive gain in weigut 
is the best index they have to good 
health in a child. Groups of wonie i 
in each county interest themselves 
in promoting the establishment of 
Child Health Centers and give valu- 
able assistance by acting as clerical 
workers. 

What is YOUR county doing to- 
ward lowering the death rate and 
helping the mothers rear healthier 
children? 



THE SERVICE OF THE COUNTRY 

TOWNS 

It ha- always been said that the winning at a stone a corner 
country towns produced a more r 



eral jBartlett, Carefully worded an 1 j l>ust tv I K ' llt " People physically, and 
minute instructions have been issued tn '* "eems to be true today in the 
to all employees engaged in handling ".lain. Of course many people fa 



the mails, so that there will be no 
possibility of misunderstanding tne 
importance of getting newspapers to 
the reader with a minimum of de- 
lay. 

The essence of the order is that 
newspapers shall not be mixed with 
parcels post at any point on their 
dispatch from the publishers' offices 
until their delivery to the addresses. 
Papers shall be handled by them- 
selves, and kept in constant transit, 
not being sent to railway terminals 
to be reworked. In other words, they 
are to be handled in the same man- 
ner a? first class mail. 

An important feature of the oruer 
is that no publication shall be given 
nny less efficient or less expehtioiTs 
treatment that at present. That 
means that publications other than 
newspapers will not sutler one iqta 
from, this progressive innovation, 
made by tin Posl Office Department. 

\nnthi-i •-• | itEiri ; 
order Is tii.- elimtnal 
mail v. iih h :i!r (cnoWi 
ixed n. ail 
d mail soiile tlBIeS 
papers, and parci i ■ 



eature of the 

on of -.,.k, f 

to the business 

Sai l;s (if mix 

contain Iefle.-s. 



i L 

of 



tunes the entire i 
''d as parcels pon 
prevent u :■ ■ urn 
'ion. 

Another . ■ .:. - , 
mder is that postmaatei 
ed to notify publishers i 



1 oft' 
• t re . 



™ <■« oiuii.v fiuiui.'-ners in eacn in- •,.;»;,, . . 

stance wh^n thftV (In not hit thn eg L S, * .2^". "" ^ 
natch which t.h,.v ; .,lv,.,-«i*,. ... ill^^i 11 "* trough th 



the country towns fail to get all they 
should have of physical benefit out 
of the healthful , life that is open to 
them. They may not have Ssuic- 
able sanitation in their homes, they 
may shut up their dwellings or work- 
ing places tight in the winter time 
and get little ventilation. Such con- 
ditions produce many folks in coun- 
try towns whose condition is far 
from good. 

Yet if you would take 100 country 
young people, and line them on one 
side of the street, and 100 city 
young folks and place them on the 
other, there is little doubt that tho 
country crowd would show the bet- 
ter physical condition. They would 
sJiojk better weight, ruddier face?, 
better muscular development, and 
they would stand straighter. 

Country people spend less time in 
stuffj rooms-, more time out doors, 
JJ?°I " many of them spend their 
day stooping over desks in office^ : 
hut their lift is more varied, a .! 
Tor men physii a) activity. 

untry tow n are a res- 

)i Iron, which the phv. : 
of the nation is kept 
com try towns in any 
you would find a dc- 
eneral health of the j 

section eventually. 

1th of country peopf 

tainetl automatical!} 

To some extent Hie 
cities arc Creeping up on them in this 



Thus thi ( 
i i vojr pjE hj • 
sical vitality 



V. t 



Ene f> 
that 

ii hei 

affart 



Boone Circuit Court. 
Ezra Mllhoit's Admrx. Plaintiff 

against 
Ezra Wilhoit's Heirs et al Deft. 

By virtue of a Judgment and or- J 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit 
Court, rendered at the Dec. Term 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause, I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at tht- 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest 
bidder, at Public Sale on Monday, 
the 4th day of February, 1924, at 1 
o'clock p. in., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit of 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ing property, to-wit: 

Tract No. 1. 

Lying and being near the town of 

Florence and on Bullock Pen branc"i. 

in Kenton County, Kentucky: Be- 

grming at a stone, a corner with Lot 

No. 3 on Bullock Pen Branch, in a 

line of John Goodridge tract of land; 

thence with the lines of said tract 

nS'.MjE 2.33 chains; B67V&E o.7. r > 

chains to a stone; thence s89Vi;E 

6.72 chains s39^E 7.84 chains; ,-- 

86V»E 303 chains; aS&tte «18 links 

to a stone in a line of Win, McClurg, 

thence with his lines up a branch 

sS5%w 6.10 chains; b25%w 5.30 

chains; slS'iw 1.82 chains; s554w- 

2.04 chans; nl2e 22 links to a point 

in the said branch, a corner with 

David Buffington; thence with his 

lines n87%w 8 chains; n86^w 3.2;> 

chains to a corner of Lot No. 3 , 

thence with a line thereof pasing a 

stone on the north side of the branch 

nSw 22.84 chains to he beginning, 

containing 35,33 acres. 

Tract No. 2. 

Lying and being in Boone «.••■! 

Kenton Counties, Kentucky, and be 

ing Lot No. 3 in division of the lands 

of Milton Wilhoit, deceased: Be- 

with 
Martha C. Wilhoit's dower in th; 
Bullock Pen Branch road; thence 
with said road or nearly so and with 
the lines of Ezra Wilhoit sT53e- 5 33 
chains; a 82>*e 8.66 chains; n69e- 
6.45 chains; n 89Vs>e 7 finks to 9 
corner of Lot No. 4 passing a stone 
on the south side of the road s5<>- 
22.84 chains, passing a stone on the 
nrth side of the branch to a corn i • 
of Lot No. 4 in a line of David Buf- 
fington; thence with his lines n86V.. 
4 4.61 chains; s80w 8.62 chains to a 
corner of the Dower; thence with 
a line thereof nl8 w26.52 chains tj 
the beginning, containing 35 acres. 

Tract No. 3. 

Lying and being in Boone Cour.- 
ty, Kentucky: Beginning at a stor:.^ 
in the public road in a line of David 
Buffington, a corner wth Lot No. 1. 
thence with a line of Lots Nos. 1 and 
2, nl9w 34.10 chains to a corner of 
Lot No. 2 n the Bullock Pen branch 
road; thence with said road or near- 
ly so, s72 , 4e 11.41 chains; s88%e- 
4.75 chains; s63 Vie 12 links to a cor- 
ner of Lot Npj :i; thence passing a 
>tone on the south side of the ro-ul 
si No 2n.r,2 chains, passing a stone 
on the smith side of the road slXo. 
26.52 chains, passing a s t ()ne on fcfa 
imi'th side of a branch to a corner 
with Lot No. 3 in a< line of David 
Bffington; thence with his lines sHOw 
•"..7:! chains; s fiS^w o.r.O chains; 
»89w .'!.(),") chains to the beginning 
containing 40 acres. 

For the p 11 r c h a s e price thn 
purchaser — ,with approved security 
or securit ies, must execute bond — , 
bearhTg-togal interest from the day 





C. H. Y0UELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Prices. 

Burlington, Ky. 
Phone Burlington 65 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohan Building 

Pike Street, Covington, Ky. 



ITJj is Yolande, eating some bread; 

With sweet golden butter and jelly it's spread. 

Find two other dlnen Right side down, ilonj bottom of drew ; top (Ma down, tloaf *rm ad 



Johnson, J. S. Recett and Thomas 
Hood s44'/4w 47.21 chains to a stone 
a corner with Hood; thence with 
Hood's line n34w 8.50 chains to a 
fence post, thence with a line of 
Hood and Russell Sparks s49Viw 
18.70 chains to a stone; thence n35 v£ 
w 11.24 chains to a stone a corner, 
with Sparks, in a line of J. M. Baker; I 
thence with Baker's n49e 61 links; 
thence n39%w 12.32 chains to a 



m * im»++m*+ » " • " •■■ 



•■•■■■■»■■... 



tj 



With the High 
School Classics 

B r MARGARET BOYD 



i . ....... .... ..... ■ T11 < , l ll 

(d liy Margaret Boyd.) 



".- . . thoM who do not think ao 
deeply, and thay were the greater 
stone; thence n47^e 5.70 chains to n " mt >er by a hundrtd to ona." 
a fence post, corner with Baker and " — Ivanhoo. 

Thomaa Ryan; thence with Ryan's Of those who do not think so deeply 
line n50e 23.06 chains to a point n there are two classes: those who can- 
a branch; thence n30^iw 8.00 chains not think and those who do not want 
to a stone with Ryan and Cleek; to think. 



f. W. Kassebaum & Sop 

JBANITE 4 flflRBLG 

MONUMENTS, 

H Large 8tc*k on Display 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 

118 Main Street, 

AURORA, IND. 

RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Covers and Open 
Door Curtains for all make of cars. 



FURNITURE, BUGGIES A WAGONS 

Reupholatered, and Celluloid 

Lighti Replaced. 



thence with Clock's line east 10.0" 
chains to the bepinninp, containing 
One Hundred Thirty-Seven (137 :» .i 
acres) more or loss. 

For the purchase price the pur- 
chaser.., with approved security or 
securities, must execute bond. ., 
bearing legal interest from the day 
of sale until paid, and having the 
force and effect of a Judgment, with 
a lien retained therein until all the 
purchase mdney is paid* Bidders will 



Not ev e rybody is able to think deep- 
ly. We d«> have mental limitations, 
though few' of us ever study hard 
enough or think deeply vnougn to 
reach them. For some people, how- 
ever, the mental limits are quickly 
reached. Kuch people are variously 
classified as morons, subnormals and 
those who cannot "think so deeply." 

Those who do not want to think are 
of two classes: those who are lazy 
and dislike mental exertion, and those 



be prepared to comply promptly with w ho are afraid to think 
these terms. | Jonathan Swift expressed the opln- 

R. E. Berkshire M. C. B. C. C. j ion that if people did much thinking. 
_ I they must go mad; and all of us rec- 
ognize the fact that ttaera are certain 
Ideas that do not bear thinking about 
Emerson warned of the risk attendant 
upon thinking when ha wrote: "Be- 
ware when th* great God lets loose 
a thinker on this planet. Then all 
things are at risk. It is as when a 
conflagration has broken out In a 



patch which th,v advertise to irf ! ir'vV ' " Kh ,hP Kn ' a, '' r l T , lCg& \ interest irom the day 

also to notify publishers when .h. ■', P? ** " ,aking for &**' f ^ J unt <L 1 pa,d ' and havin « the 

arc- sendir* to wrong addresses and K7S T^ V ""^ Tht ' t " Jl1 "- ! T and . * ffe ? °u f * Jud ^ ent ' with 
to the addresaes of deceased ne- ' > ( °^ '' m ' ud play ^ound,,! a ,ie " Gained therein until all the 
sons. Publishers will also be notine-i K . k I th u V^u^^-fol ki . n hall ) 1 a ,. , , pnrrh as e mon ey^s-paid. bid d er s w i if 
when they are putting m, th. i'r ai ' ' ,■ T '" , -PP-.i-tunity for the healtli- ** Prepared to comply promptly with 



to the addresses of deceased 
sons, l'ublishers will also be notific I 
when they are putting up their ma 
in an incorre< t manner, 

Under the new system, iK'Wxpaper>< 
will be made up ifl s o porate iacks 
plainly labeled with the word "New 
pa p e r s , " — -If— there nrr only"a-^few" 
copies of newspapers at the point of 
dispatch, . they will be placed 

pouches with lir-t das.-, mail or m 
separate sacks, even though the sen ka 
are only partially lillled. 

This order means much 
American public. It i one 
most important and iai 
steps in post o ce history 
the benefit of those who desire to 
have their newspapers placed before 
them at as early a moment as poss- 
ible. This should keep both tin- 
city and rural population in closer 
and quicker touch with their several 
fields of activities. 



to the 

of the 

reaching 

It is for 



One-teaetier schools are disappear- 
ing in Kentucky at the rate of neai 
ly seven a week, as they become con- 
solidated into larger school* with 
two, three, four, or more teacher 
New union and consolidated school 
are established to take their pin. 
at the rate of about :>o a year. To 
enable the children to attend the 
consolidated schools, 7* school 
vide free t iiinipoit.il mu, u la| 

oiotoi busse • and B i hoi « draw 

iiit lei 



pro 

l is 



l ytumg-4ol ki i s hall ha 
abundant opportunity for the heal)', 
t'H out dpor games through which 
youth secure-- its he.-t development. 

WHAT GERMANY CAN PAY 

The American and other t-xperts 

appointed by the reparation commi.- 
"" to determine What Germany can 
pay toward the damage that it did, 
have now beguri work. The prosper- 
ity of tin- world in the immediate Cu- 
ture depends much on whether there 
i a willingness to accept the reconv 
mendations that these competent e ••- 
I 1 "- 1 shall make. 

•'"iniatiy can evner possibly pay 
fOJ the harm it did by starting the 
War. I he buildings and cities and 
nunc.-, and orchards destroyed artJ 
bul the tumor part of the los. The 
harm done was infinite and immeas- 
urable u extends to crippled and 
enfeebled soldiers and to the hisses 
by sorrow and death. 

But to get money out of a nati > , 
they'musl si how be given an In- 
centive to pay, If they |Y, I I hat ti ■ 
more jhey n cover irom , |„. „.,,. 

more thej must pay, they udi' |„" 

down and do then Deal to pay noth- 
ing. Sonje amount should be \\x -.1 

1,l; " the <;- rman mil r. ,,ih ,, , , , 



Bidders will 
be prepared to comply promptly with 
these terms. 

R. E. BERKSHIRE, M. C. 



^nyons - in g< t mai i 
minutes, but it mas 



rnl 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court 
Mattie J. Kite's Admr Plaintiff 

against 
Reg Kite, et al. Defendant 

By virtue of a Judgment and order 
of Sale of the Boone Circuit Court, 
rendered at the December Term 
thereof, Hi23, in the above cause I 
shall proceed to offer for sale at th e 
Court House door in Burlington, 
Boone County, Ky., to the highe-,1 
bidder, at Pubh'c Sale on Mondav, 
the 4 th day of Feb., 1924, at ono 
o'clock p. m., or thereabouts being 
County Court day, upon a credit if 
Six and Twelve months, the follow- 
ing property to-wit: 

Beginning at a line tree a corner 
•vith II. H. Cleek and Bert Huffman: 
thence with Huffman's line silfcj 
"■'• 18 chains to a white oak tree; 
then,,. n50tte 2:1.00 chains to a line- 
tree on McCoy's fork „f Mudlick 
creek, a corner with Huffman, Rich- 
aid Sleet and Waller Johnson. 
I hen,,, with Johnson's line sSU 5.50 
1 haiiiH to a point on the north 
"' the creek j t hence erosatng 
- ■!■ <k iiOtn t .!• i chains to a stone In 

lling fence; thmiee with a line of 



Commissioner's Sale. 

Boone Circuit Court, Ky 
Jacob B. Crigler's Admr., Plaintif 

against 
Nicholas E. Crigler, et al. Deft. 
By virtue of a Judgment and or- 
der of Sale of the Boone Circuit great city and no man knows what Is 
Court, rendered at the August Term j safe or where It will end. There is 
thereof, 1923, in the above cause I not a piece of science but its flank may 
shall proceed to offer for sale at the be turned tomorrow; there is not any 
Court House door in Burlington, I literary reputation, not the so-called 
Boone County, Ky., to the highest i eternal names of fame, that may not 
bidder at Public Sale on Monday, j he reviled and condemned. The very 
the 4th day of February 1924, at 1 hopes of man, the thoughts of his 
o'clock p. ta., or thereabouts being heart, the rcHcion of nations, the inan- 
County Court day, upon a credit of nors and morals of mankind are all at 
Six months, the following property, 
ty-wit: < — 

A certain lot of land situated in 
the town of Hebron, Boone County, 
pentUCky; Beginning at a stone oi- 
the North Bend Road, a corner v. :-ii 
■ '. If. Tanner; thence with said roi I 
sl',w l.:u; poles to a stone; thence 
sKti'iw 17.72 poles to a stone- 
thence nlSw 1.44 poles to a stone a 
corner of J. H. Tanner; thence with 
his line n8GViel9Vi poles to the be- 
ginning, containing one-half of an 
acre. 



People 



who use the 
classified 
ads in this 
paper profit by them. 
The little ads bring quick 
r£s»:ts. What have 
you for sale or want to 
to buy. The cost is too 
small to consider. 



J. C GORDON 
Superintendent of Schools 

OK BOORS COUNTY 

Will be in his office in Burlington 
the first and second Monday ai*d 
the third and fourth Saturday / 
in each month. 



the mercy of a now generallstatlen." 

And nimbi: "What is the hardest task 
In the worbl? To think. I wouW put 
myself In the attitude to look in the 
eye an abstract truth, and I cannot 
F bleaeh and withdraw on this side 
and that. I seoin to know what he 
meant, who said, 'Ko man can see Co<l 
face to face and live.' " 

Before a man can think deeply with- 
out danger to his community it is 
necessary that he should tie well In- 
formed. ConfudUS Is credited with 
the statement that "thought without 
For the purchase price ,h- l "' r " in - |li IM'rllous." »nd there L, no 
chaser, with approved security or se- <1oubt thnt mnch of our Dewettt sorial 
curities, must execute bond—, bear- ""' , , Pronomi( ' unr(X ^ ,s m,p t0 th « 
ing legal interest from the day of, thinkin * nf mPn whn wero not suffl " 
sale until paid, and having- the fnrco I clen,,y W(1 " »«""nnod ' 
and effect of a Judgment, with a lien 
retained threin until all the purchase 
money is paid. Bidders will be pre 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by (Adver- 
tising. 



When thinking on social and eco- 

nondc problems it is necessary that 
the thinker should know not only the 
pared to comply with these'terms ! t" 00 ^' 1 ' 1 ' 1 fr " ,h 0T M> Mibje.-t, but 
R. E. Berkshire M. C. B. C. C. j "'" rw.venolot? of hunmniiy „s wett. 



A Rat That Dkln't Smell After 
Being Dead for Three Month^, 

"I swear it was dead thrtt month*," vritr-. SI-. J. 
Kykcsl.V. J.i. "I saw this tat every <! y.[.\: ^jina 
Kat-Sna|i Uhind a liarrcl. Month ...n rtvanU, my 
wife looked behind the liartct. Then; il wiu— dead.'j 
JUt-bnap kUs in three aims for J.V. 05t, ii.^ j. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

ii. u. Kivthe, Bnrliugton, Kv. 
Oiilley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky 



Not merely are the younger gen- 
eration going to run things vcrv 
soon, but they are glad to give ad- 
vice to any old timers who may sec-K 
it. 



Some people seem to thing that 

marriage i an obsolete institution, 

but children who need mothering, 
won't usually agree. 



There is a growing feeling thnt 
sunn girls would appear better if 
they wore more clothes and less 
paint. 





N. F. PENN, M D j 
Covington 

Ky. 

We Test Eyes Right 

and 

Make Glasses That Fit 

at 

Reasonable Prices 

WITH MOTCH 613 MADISON AVE. 



Better Than Traps For Rats 

Writea Adams Drug Co., Taza* 
They say: " RAT-SNAP ia dota* the work 
and the rat undertaken aro as busy aa pop 
com on a hot stove." Try it on your rata. 
RAT-SNAP is a "money back" smarantoed 
sure k i Her. Cornea ready f or nae ; no mix-' 
ing with other foods. Cats and doga won't 
touch iU Rata dry up and leave no smell. 
Three sizes: 85c for one loom; 68o for 
house or chicken yard ; 11.26 for bama and 
ou t buildings. Start killing rata today. 
Sold and Cmaraatead t»y 
Gulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky 
O. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

TAKB YOUR COUNTY PAPftft. 

READ YOUR 

COUNTY PAPER 

$1.50 The Year. 

Subscribe for the RCORDER 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



FOR SALE 

BLUE GRASS FARM 



At lust accounts tin- nation 
not looking no ly for city 

ballroom queens a» for country pi - 

i ooh< 



The postmaster of Boston recently 
made a very careful .survey of tho 
cost of living of a postal employee 
supporting a family of four persons, 
lie found the annual cost to be $2,- 
400, nnd this did not provide for a 
savings account. 

Various kinds of losses can be d.- 
dinted from your Income taf re- 
turn, but it 11 not believed that the 
government will allow anything at 
cuuho your best nirl has turned you 
down 



A flue Stock Farm, 1B2 acres, one 
inilofrom Burlington, Boono coun- 
ty, Ky., on pike, Rood fi room bouse, 
largo concrete winter sun room, 2 
bams, other buildings, plenty water, 
splendid farm for grass, corn and 
tobaccn. Price, $18,000, buildinga 
worth mora than price of farm. For 
information, write or see 

l». B. Castlenmn, Krliuiger, 
or Peter Itiichnrt, Ncwpnoi Kv 
Jan 17 '_»l 



"Whither are we drifting?" H . H k 
the alarmists. Well, just m.w wo 
arc drifting along to the point whero 
we must select our garden *coi|n. 



■aaaaaaa 



T 



BOONE CO. RECORDER 



BOONE COUNT T RECORLEB 



, - . 



i s .i ..I 

Pu blurted every Thursday 

N. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



Foreign Advertising Representative 

_the ami-^k;an press association^ 

Entered at the Postoffice, Barling- 
ten, Ky., as second-class mail. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

Furniahed on application. Tha 
valve of the RECORDER a* an ad- 
vertising- medium ia unquestioned. 
Tfca character of the tdrertiiemsati 
Bow in its colunana, and faa lambir 
•f them, tell the whole story. 



Franchise for Sale. 



The Recorder Stands For 
BETTER FARMING, BETTER CI1 

IZENS, btutK KGsWaW 



This and That. 

Why not call it the outgo tax? 
No town is any bigger than the 
smallest man in it. 

Some men take out their fire In- 
surance by joining church. 

Too many girls are more interested 
in hims than they are hymns. 

Woman was made after man — and 

this is a good year to keep after him. 
Man has done great things, but he 

hasn't yet invented a way to lay ai 

egg- 
Poverty is a terrible evil, but some 

folks consider that work is a greater 

one. 

Forty thousand tons of tobacco 
are smoked in the British isles every 
year. 

The entire population of Sweden 
does not equal that of New York 
City. 

'Nother thing this country needs 
is less crime wave and more flag 
wave. 

When a man gets grouchy, he 
o lght to go out to th -j woods and livo 
alone. 

Some physicians are specialists. In 
other words, they have their favorite 
diseases. 

There are 80,000 stenographers in 
New York City — enough to make HO,- 
000 jealous wives. 

If it weren't for prohibition and 
the electa.., /Hudcville houses would 
have to close up. 

The fellow who stops to tie his 
shoestring in the race of life gener- 
ally gets left behind. 

The girl who leaped oat of the 
window of a hotel the other day toon 
leap year at it* word. 

Being thrifty thrift week won'r 
pile up a bank account. It takes the 
365-days-a-year variety. 

Too many women in this day and 
age prefer platinum and diamond 
rings to teething rings. 

Singing doesn't always indicate 
talent. Sometimes it's a hardship 
for those who have to listen. 

When only cars paid for in full 
are allowed on the highways, thj 
tra c problem will be solved. 

Example is a powerful thing. The 
flappers and the shieks do the late- 
dances because their parents do. 

Barnyardly speaking, many a mm 
who is cocky around the office, shop 
or store, is henpecked at home. 

The country would probably ,V 
better off if more people were laying 
bricks and fewer throwing them. 

If the thieves keep on stealing 
false teeth, some people may have I 
to put padlocks on their mouths. 

Colin Kelly has qualified as com- 
mittee of Benjamin Kirtley. He sue-, 
ceeded •'■ E. Hodges who resigned. 

Astronomers have discovered a 
i <'\v batch of stars. Wo see a new 
batch everytinie we bump our head. 

Dogs bark at the moon but it goes 
en shining just the same. Something 
for chronic grouches to think about 

American cities are reputed to be 
livimr beyond (heir income* In that 
they have nothing on the most of uv. 



Fiscal Court of Boone County, 
Dec. 4th, 1923. 
Hon. N. E. Riddell, Judge Presiding. 
A Resolution providing for the let- 
ting at Public Bidding of the fran- 
chise right of entering upon all the 
public roads and highways of Boone 
County, Kentucky, ntcessary for the 
purpose of erecting, constructing, 
incorporating, maintaining, replacing 
and removing poles wires, brackets, 
supports, guys and all necessary ap- 
pendages thereto, and thereon, said 
poles suitable and proper to conduct 
a high voltage electric currant over 
and along any and all roads and 
highways in Boone county, now open 
or to be opened, for a period of 
twenty years from the d*te of ac- 
ceptance of the bid of tb» an/v« g of..i 
bidder. 

Be it resolved by the Fiscal Court 
of Boone County, Kentucky, that the 
County Clerk and be she is hereby 
appointed a committee of one to 
advertise, by three insertions in the 
Boone County Recorder that said 
Fiscal Court will receive sealed bids 
up to twelve o'clock Tuesday, Feb. 
5th, 1924, for the sale of the Fran- 
chise right and the privilege of en- 
tering upon and along all the pub- 
lic roads and highways of Boone 
County, Ky., necessary for the pur- 
pose of erecting, constructing, oper- 
ating, maintaining, replacing and re- 
moving poles, wires, brackets sup- 
ports, guys and all other necessary 
appendages thereto and thereon, 
suitable and proper to conduct a 
high voltage electric currant over 
and along the roads and highways oi 
Boone County. 

All bids shall be sealed and mark- 
ed "Bid for Electric Light Franchise" 
and the Fiscal Court reserves the 
right to reject any and all bids; and 
no bids will be accepted for an 
amount less than the cost of adver- 
tising, and all bidders may in their 
discretion, make their bid for the 
cost of adversising, plus any addi- 
tional sum they may desire to bid. 

Upon the acceptance of the bid of 
the successful bidder his successors 
and assigns shall havt the right to 
go upon the roads and highways oJ 
Boone County covered by this reso- 
lution and there erect, construct, 
maintain, <rt ...ir and operate a line 
of poles and wires, brackets, cross- 
arms and all other apptndages there- 
to or thereon, and do all things nec- 
essary for the purpose of construct- 
ing, operating, maintaining, replac- 
ing or repairing or removing the ar>- 
-pliancea used by him or it, in — a 
proper emplyment herein contemp- 
lated. 

None of the poles, wire, brackets, 
cross-arms or other fixtures shall he 
so replaced or maintained as to in- 
terfere with the travel on or the 
drainagt of any road in Boone Coun- 
ty, and any and all poles, wires and 
fixtures shall be changed upon the 
resuest of the Fiscal Court or the 
County Road Engineer of Boom 
County, Kentucky. 

N. E. RIDDELL, 

County Judge 



TURN ME OVER 

jXnq pinoM /6uoui-jk$o Jihok 

pafsvM /Cauovu *%fo ^ l H 
p™ jnq'juop j Creep <oj\j 

4 )))ir^ 



PAGE PIVI 




~2grudge, my smoking 

a cigar now &ru$ therv. 
« - — _______^ 




Don't let that 
cough run on 

IPS much easier to check it now 
than after serious complica- 
tions develop. Nothing like Dr. 
Bell's Pine-Tar Honey to stop 
coughing quickly. Just those 
medicines that up-to-date doctors ? 
prescribe for loosening heavy 
phlegm and soothing throat tis- 
sues are in it — combined with 
the old reliable remedy— pine-tar 
honey. Keep it on hand for all 
the family. 

All druggists. Be sure to get 
the genuine. 

DR. BELUS Pine-Tar Honey 

•«Do Rats Talk to Each Other?" 
Asks Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 

"I Rot five cakes of Rat-Snap am! threw pieces 
around feed store. Got about halt a'dozrn dc id rju 
• dayfortwosorid-rrets. Suddenly, thev c>t fewer 
Now we haven't any. Who told them" about Rat- 
Snap." Rat* dry up and leave no smell. Three 
sues: J5c. 65c, $1.25. 

Said and guaranteed by ■ 

Oulley & Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky. 



FOR SALE 



Farm of forty-seven acres on He- 
bron pike near Limaburg, Ky; good 
house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings; eleetric lights; plenty of fruit 
and water. A beautiful home. 
I. DUNSON. 
n29 R. F. D. Florence, Kv 



Murder is reported by a newspaper 
writer to he on the increase. That's 



Notice is hereby given that in pur- 
suance of the foregoing order I will, 
as instructed therein, receivt bids 
for the sale of said franchise until 
noon Tuesday February 5th, lie!!. 
All bids shall be sealed ma r ked 
"BIDS FOR ELECTRIC LIGHT 
FRANCHISE." No bids will he re- 
ceived or considered unless the 
amount of tjie advertising is bid. 

Given under my hand as clerk of 
the Boone Fiscal Court this January 
Ith, 1923. 

M. E. ROGERS, 
Boone Fiscal Court 



JlYUf 




When those folly 
:in In" 1 u • 1 to best 



because the women have taken it up. 

While the political parties are fin- 
ing places for the national conven- 
tions, who is going to fix the dele- 
gates? 

No one denies that love is not the 
the greatest thing in the world, but 
it won't meet the second installment 
on the gasoline eater. 

Flannels are to be worn this spring 
and summer, but our fashionable 
women wouldn't think of wearing 
such a thing in ero weathci\ 

Another coal strike is rumored. 
When the coal miners quit digging 
the consumers begin digging for 
more money to meet the coal bills. 

Claimed that fences should be 
put up along all the adngerous high- 
way places, but the speeding motor- 
ists will he able to knock them dour! 

A New York man attempted to 
steal a corba from the zoo. Evidence 
enough he hadn't had anything, else 
be wouldn't have been wanting 
snakes. 

'I i> often claimed thai presiden- 
tial year interferes with business, bill 
the American people can stand it. (u 
long as it does not interfere witll 
base hull. 



V Virginia mini , i ,,.| th,. 
.'re a menace to prohibition, 
prohibition is a menace to the 
if they are 
I he brand. 



n, »i 
An ! 
i -it'll. 

not very careful abou; 



GASOLINE TAX 

The citizens of this Stale are in- 
terested in thne construction and 
maintenance of public highways, an I 
the cost of the construction and 
maintenance of public highways, an I 
the cost of the construction an 1 
maintenance .of these highway; 
should" be borne by the Individuals in 
proportion to the use made thereof 
SO far as practicable. 

All of the revenue derived from 
the licensing of mo tor v e h ic l e s and 
the gasoline tax law is now applied 
to the construction and maintenance 
of these roadways, amounting to 
more than three million dollars an- 
nually. In our opinion, the burden 
of constructing and maintaining pub- 
lie roads can be more equitably dis- 
tributed by increasing the gasoline 
tax, and we would recommend that 
this matter should receive the care- 
ful consideration of the Gen e ral As 
sembly in order to arrive at an 
equitable distribution of this burden. 
— State Tax Commission. 

MANKIND'S GREATEST 
SERVANT 

Samuel Install says: "Tremendous 
changes are coming in America wi'h 
the development of Power. Fifty 
years from now Power will be so 
cheap and accessible that man will 
be independent of his surroundings. 

"A vast system of'.central generat- 
ing plants will place Power at th- 
disposal of the small village and th • 
isolated farmstead H a well as the 
great city. 

Power will mako the comfort* and 
luxuries which are today insoparab ■ 
from the large city available to e\ 
er> home in the country. 

'Kleclricity will perforin all the 
mechanical processes of Industry «•!.! 

m "' i of the dome in m let i Elvc 

tncily ipelll the kmll of drwdtfi 

HiHliuiee may lend enchant meit, 
but not when you hu\e | i|„t tin. 



liv.l 
el'i 



il> 



them We u .< - leli en 
to tn.llce liv ' ■ our Una 
combine It Wttl h 
right tnBtincss. Tins fs th 
mv bl ctiit <l 'Ugh, and ii 
myself, f don't think yon 
belter way: Mi\ I !■ v 



■ I often 

r down- 

f ay I make 

I do gay it 

could find a 
iblos pooini of 



short etuier. either lard, boater or veue- 

talib' f.it. into f 'ii' 1 lev'l cups of gelf- 

rlslng dour whit b has been sin, <i. Then 
stir in a cap of bwi I I n Ik or iv cup of 
cold water. 1!" ;-urc net to use sour 



„1: 



milk or buttermilk, ami du not add 
Have a sofl dough, then i ill out on a 
lightly floured board. Rake in a very 
hot oven. With this you >an rflaka 

cranhriTv entrtitur, ir'"'i, rry short, rke 
or cranberry tr.rr. Tli.-y'-r nftgrjoth 

For Pineapple Shoncsk* 
"Emmy Lou taught ui : new wrinkle 
the other day. Ph" ju. t sweetened my 
biscuit dough a trifle and made it richer 
and baked it in two porta in a round 
tin. When it was nice and brOwn sho 
took it out. split it while hot and but- 
tered It. Then she poured a rich sauce 
of crushed pineapple over this and we 
had real pineapple shortcake' 



>' WIV1 



FARMERS' WIVES BENEFITTED. 

The human and social phase of 
farm elect riiicat ion, «s opposed to 
strictly economic phase, was stressed 
at a recent meeting of American As- 
sociation of Agricultural Engineers 
at Chicago. M. II. Ayleeworth, Na- 
tional Electric Light Assn., said: 

"I lirmly believe that electricity 
will odd from fifteen to twenty years 
10 the life of fai Hers' wives. Water 
in the bom*, pumped by electricity, 
the eleeeti c iron, the electric wash- 
ing machine, vacuum cleaner, range, 
refrigerator, percolators, curling 
nous all of Ihe.e thing! mv un- 
known to most farmers' wives mid 

daughter*, Electricity will bring 

l hem. 




Trade Whrre They All Trade 



1924 SEEDS 

Our experience in seed buying and distributing is at your service. Our rec- 
ord as distributors of quality seeds is your guarantee or quality when you 
send your order. We do not try to compete with low grade seeds as we 
can not sell high purity and high germinating seed at prices you pay for 
inferior seed. 

"THE BEST 15 InuinE TOO GOOD FOR 

THE FARMER/' 

has been our slogan and we have lived up to it. And yet our prices are 
oftimes lower than the poor grade seeds you get elsewhere. A few cents 
more on a bushel of seed mean dollars more for you at harvest. Send us 
your orders or inquiries on 

Clover, Red Sapling, Alsike, Alfalfa, Japan 
White or Yellow Sweet, Ky. Blue Grass, 
Orchard Grass, Timothy, Red Top. 
Vetch, Kent ucky Lawn Grass, etc 



Kansas Kream Flour, 



Arcade Flour. 



0J£O.(d.Ga 




WHOLESALE— "Covington's Largest Seedand Grocery House'.'- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18-20 West Seventh St. 

PhMe ' 0o,h " 5 " d " 6 COVIN GTON, KENTUCKY. J} 

Ready to Meet Winter 





\y ii 




^^^ll^t^^^!^!^ 



You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered by 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

ot 

Erlanger, Ky. 



When Winter conies it will lind youth 
equipped 'for a frolic with It. Innum- 
rrable sweaters, .faekejg, scarfs and 
dps uf warm w uiiTITuve "sports" writ 
ten in every gtltcll Of llieir eozy tex 
hire ami In tlielr glowing colors, lien 
N h matched srl Jacket, scarf and ear 
of angora — in two colors (the seurl 

tillislied \vi!h y:.rtl i'rhr.'e). 



I ^^f^^^^^^^^t^^^^^^^'^^^ 




Established 1886 



MENTHDC COUGH DROPS 

■ •• -■«*•■■ , ■ ■ 

*■ for Msfe and throat 

Giver DuickReiief 



x ■ ■ a ■ 




in The 

NEW YEAR 

RIGHT 

Opening a bank account is the most practical 
beginning. Adding to it gives you a comfortable 
and satisfied reeling of security. It also stimulates 
your energy and insures you-r future, if you con- 
tinue in the same way. This bank inyites you to 
become a depositor and 

GROW WITH IT. 

Boone Go. Deposit Bank 

Burlington. Kentucky. 



and Older Folk 

cause many c«_«rs «f constipation, 
flatulence, headache, nausea uad 
brea th, sleeplessness and em ana 

thm. 
FREY'S VERMIFUGE 

iaa aafe, nld-f aahionr*^ r, mr.lv for 
worm*. In uae foe over acventy- 

£«• y eara. 

30 c«nr§ a bottU 
at your dealera, or arnt by mail oa 
racaipt ot price. 

E. A S. FREY 

hdttSavlhnaa'Sii. DolN 

Baltimore, Md. 




The CoiigrcMmen aru trying to h 

ten In the \.,|. I of lite |ie..|i|e, but it 

i . .iiiiitiiii in boar ths «m« while 
or«t»i an- making men Qui 



"I Cot Real Mad when 1 Lost My 
Setting Hen," writes Mrs. Manna, 
N.J. 

"Whm I went into our turn and (ourul my but 
•rtlrr ilr.irl 1 go' K ll mil One ivukajii- i.l Rat. 
Sn.ip liili.l I Poultry rahrratnould usf 

Rat'Snap. ' ikr nnmwM No«mrl| 

(rum dead mi Ihfr* Ui Prkra, 39c. 63c, St .2S. 
I .tin 1 .: ..I by 

h. U. Miyiiie, Ktirltnifton, K \ . 

Outlet A I'- mi i . Mm hu. 'i.. ii K \ 



■ I be i u n, urged in liu'i 

then lieil.li llieh, Lilt I In > -.In, ul, I ,,., 

Ilelil llielll mi ln t -h i | , hit th, 
nl the lull II dm. i 



NATURAL SELECTION 

Some modern philosophers think 
that the only permanent way for the 
human race to make progress, k' 
through the evolutionary process it* 
natural selection. The fittest will sur- 
vive, they say, and eventually assure 
the progress of the race. Helping the 
unlit to survive through charities 
and philanthropies, they say, may 
tend to weaken the race as a whole. 
The trouble wth that teory is that 
it places too high a value on mater 
! ial power. The moral and spiritually 
j tit are at a disadvantage under such 
' a system, as they are not usually %o 
1 d '>' *« and lighting. Accorduist 

in thai theory, Germany should have 

i W 0H <!"• war. It had di 
; power and elllciency more Ihan 

I oiber nation. 

But human pii would I 

been set bat l> man) ) i 

; tunny had wnn the w u . 
i net ili\i-ln|i. i 1 1 

nihil' than 
i powi i unci material efT1 



The evolution of religion is wortn 
watching. 

In ancient days there were few 
sects, and their beiefa were few bjj 
sincere. Just now it is difficult to 
say how many sects there are, and 
their beliefs are as myriad as the 
leaves on a tree. 

In the nl, | days there were few 
churches, hut these were well sup- 
putted, and exerted a power in tho 
land. Todaj they are springing up 
over night, almost, ami half *>f them 
ate operated on a starvation plane. 

It will continue until we have a 
Malul of Churches, and then some 
strong man will come along and w rid 
I hem all uit.i oju grout universal (sa- 
nation, mum., :i I| rulicul 
l-siies ami founded imply upon th>! 

in -ni.il teachings n( Christ. 
W hen that an appeal the I'timvl 
w ill .ur.mi i inn,. ,, u ,, 1(|1 j 

' ' I'"' k I III tho 



Few guild icutita an 
ill home 



■■ 



w—m 



m 



■■■BBB1 



^^^^MM 



MOB 



AW, WHATS THE USE 




BOONE COONTY RECORDER 



ByL.F.VanZelm 

© Wettem Nfwjptpc r Union 



Flivvers Are' All Right, But— 




BURLEY POOL HAS 100,285 
MEMBERS IN SEVEN STATES 



Acre* More To Be Market- 
ed ThrotJgti Co-opera- 
tive. 



CO 



Membership in the Hurley Tobac- 
Growers' Co-operative Associa- 
tion has passed the 100,000 mark 
set as a Roal by the field service Home 
time ago, when the receipt of new 
contracts since December 1 put the 
total at 10<>,285, and an addition of 
b,V2G members since December 1st, 
from the counties of Kentucky; 4U?i 
from Indiana; 556 from Ohio; 188 
from Tennessee; 229 from West 
"Virginia; 79 from Missouri; 14'. I 
from Virginia; and 11 from othe. - 
states. 

oSme of the contracts had no fig- 
ures in the acreage blank, but the. 
acreage reported on the contracts 
6,978 for Kentucky and 2,546 for 
the other Burley states, a total of 
8,542. The field service estimated the 
number of acres pledged on the con- 
tracts in which that item was left 
blank as sufficient to run the acre- 
age signed considerably above 12, 
O00. 

Hardin county, Ky., led in the 
i number of contracts signed, wit i 
309; Adair was second with 270; 
Breckinridge third with 247; Mor- 
gan fourth wfth 170; Green fifth 
with 157; Hart sixth with 117; Bar- 
Ten seventh with 118, and Taylor 
eighth with 103. 



BOONE COUNTY BUREAU i FARM AND HOME MEET 

WILL BECOME ACTIVE.! ENDS FRIDAY 

At a called meeting of the Boone j Lexington, Ky. — The four day ses- 

I County Farm Bureau, last Monday, sions of Farm and Home Convention 
Add.t.on of 5.426 Made Since Dc- ^ w(?rp discusscd for reorganiza . bcing held here thjs week at thc Ken . 

I tion, that the Bureau might expand tacky College of Agriculture will bo 
and continue its good work. j closed Friday with genesal discus-' 

During the last year, and in the ' sions on the needs for Kentucky ag- I 
face of many difficulties, the Farm : riculture and rural life. 
Bureau did $81,939.36 worth of bu- I Talks in the livestock meetings will j 
iness. This was twice the amourt be given by A. C. Ball, Secretary of 
of business transacted in the previous ' the Kentucky Dairy Products - * Assoe- 
year, and in checking over the books, iatibn, Oscar Erf of the Dairy De- 
it was found that comparatively few partment of Ohio State University, 
Boone county farmers are member^ and J. E. Gibson, U. S. Bureau of 
of the Farm Bureau, and doing bus- j Animal Industry. The Farm Building 
iness with it. The Farm Bureau hn n School will consider the location of 
saved thousands of dollars for the j farm buildings and farm sewage dis- 
farmers of this county and will con- 1 posal in the morning and in the af- 
tinue to do so if Boone county peo-Jtcrnoon tour the Experiment Station 
pie will stick together and fight to- farm and the B F. Wells and E. M. 
gether, according to Clem Kendal!, j McCullough farms 



President of the Farm Bureau. 

In a short talk County Agent R. 
J. Matson explained that the feed 
problem was only a small one. He 
spoke of the Farm Bureaus part ! ti 
State Legislation and National Leg- 



Dr. Warren H. Wilson will address 
tht rural ife conference for the sec- 
ond time on Friday, dealing with 
community problems, while Miss 
Mary E. Sweeney will speak of the 
challenge of the community to the 



islation; of how the Farm Burea.i home, and Mrs. R. E. Tipton, presi- 
has fostered the Burley Tobacco As- 1 dent of the Fayette Community 
sociation, the Cooperative Pure Milk I Council, Lexington, will discuss the 
Association, and the Poultry Assoc- community organization and its work 



iation. He said, "The Farm Bureau 
1 stands for Cooperation.*' 

It saw those local organizations in 
their infancy, and now they are *U 
successfully under operation, nev 



"Governor W. J. Fields delivered 
~im second message to the General 
Assembly Monday recommending: 

A 30 cents rate on tt» $1#» real / 
tax, a 25 per cent reduction on the 
present real estate rate of 40 cents. 

Fines of $100 to $500 and revo- 
cation of license for driving motor 
ears hen druak, first offense, an J 
imprisonment from one to three years 
for second offense. 

Making it a felony to carry a con- 
cealed weapon without a license. 

Competitive bidding in all par- 
chases of sales by State Tepartments 
in excess of $1,000. 

Amending statute relating to tak- 
ing of gasoline so as to guard against 
tax dodging. 

Employment of consulting, engin- 
eer and expert accountant to invest- 
igate and audit Department of State 
Roads and Highways, under a $10,- 
000 appropriation for that purpoie. 

Employment services of expert* 
from the American Prison Associa- 
tion, under the law governing the 
Board of Charities and Corrections, 
and the board's administration. 



In addition to the speakers men 
tioned leading experts and scientists 
pf the Kentucky College of Agricul- 
ture and Experiment Station will 
deal with some of the principle prob 



coughing— 

exhausts you so that you are 
mora tired in the morning 
than when you went to bed. 
Dr. King's New Discovery 
stops coughing by gently 
stimulating the 
mucous mem- 
branes to throw 

off clogging se- jKIK£k ■S'^ 
cretions. It has j 
an agreeable/ 
taste. All drug-\ 
gists. 




HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 

SHERLEY MASON IN 

"The New Teacher" 

LEE KIDS COMEDY 

"Kids and Skids" 

Admission 22 Cents, : . : Children 10 CenU 

War Tax Included 





FOR SALE ETC 




moves are at hand. Plans are bein^ j lems which confront Kentucky far- 



mers at this time, giving demonstra- 
tions, lectures and answering ques- 
tions, livestock, poultry, farm build- 
ings and farm crops. 



The Farmer Gets 88 Cents Out of 
Every Dollar the Packer Receives. 



organized to establish a Cooperative 
Live Stock Commission Merchant at 
the Cincinnati Union Stock Yards. If 
the Farm Bureau does not build up 
a better organization, Boone county 
will not be represented. It is alto- 
gether probable that other coopera- 
tive selling moves will come in the 

»^i U r re ; "T* u hich °? n r *»•*•* packing industry ranks 
named fruit and poultry products. fi„ t among American induirie. in 

. Jke .W «Y^! *"?• n' .^"1 value o£ Products sold. The value of 

!£? ?° n * " ,e . 8ame ^a. Bo^ P at the annual production is between 

eapecial emphasis on Farm Bureau four and four and one-half billion 

Loyalty, and on the reduction of dollars ■««■■ 

Unten^tv Me ^° B T" ma i ° £ The Cen.ua Bureau report for 
Union county, Ky where sucht « 1919 shows that $4,246,000,000 

ZSLJT 8UCee ? fulljr , P ut on ' rs - ! worth of packing industry finished 
suiting in a saving of over 20,000 products were sold in the year 



dollars to ^„ir farmers 

After these talks general plans 
were discussed to make the Farm 
Bureau serve a greater number cf 
people in the county. The meeting 
adjourned late to reconvene on Mon- 
day, Feb. 4th at 10:30 in the office 
in Burlington, when plans for the 



Commenting on this fact, Secre- 
tary Wallace of the Department of 
Agriculture says: 

"It is worthy of remark that this 
sum was only 12% per cent, greater 
than the amount which the packers 
paid for the live stock." 

In other words, $3,775,000,000, 01 



The remains of Mrs. Charlotte 
Keim, aged 87 years, widow of the 
lati> leter Keir.'!, who died at the 
horr-f <>f her daughter, Mrs. Michael 
Huijck, 523 Gltnwood Ave., Cincin- 
nati, Sunday, Jan. 27th were buried 
*t Petersburg, Wednesday, Jan. 31. 
Mrs. Keim for many years was a cit- 
ixen of Petersburg, and was tho 
mother of Ed. Keim of that place. 



Dr. t*. C. Rankin and Joseph Cleek, 

of Walton, are enjoying the fishing 

-in the Gulf. They caught about 150 

few davs aifn This may he 

fish story. 



BIG FARMERS AND 

BUSINESS MEN'S BANQUET 

The Big Farmers and Businew 
'Men's banquet will be held at the 
Liberty Theatre at Lawrenceburg, 
<«n February 29th. 

Hon. O. E. Bradfute, President of 
the American Farm Bureau Federa- 
tion will address this banquet. Mr. 
Bradfute is a sound, conser vative 
man, ho has a national reputation. 
His address will be of great value to 
the farmers and business men of 
the county. Other features and de- 
tails of the program will be given 
-later. 

A charge of seventy-five cents atr 
plate win be made to help pay the 
'expenses of the banquet. Only six 
> hundred can be accommodated. S), 
It 1s up to e*ch person who wants a 
ticket to look after, the matter early. 
Tickets may fee secured at the Coun- 
ty Agents office at Aurora, and from 
the officers of the various township 
Farm bureaus. Tickets will be on sale 
by Monday, Feb. 4th. 



Ed. Rice still continues quite poor- 



year's business will be decided upon. ah l" £ er w <> r ^?3 775,000 000, 01 
_ mmm ^^_ p about 88 per cent, of the value of 

rTTTSn>rkTOTii7D . t ! le fini8hed Products, was paid by 

UL^ruWUCK the packers for their raw material,, 

Robt. Tanner was confined to his almost wholly live stock, 

room a few days last week with a Competition both in buying live 

lame back. . anmals and in selling meat products 

Woodsawings which had been a m akes it necessary for the national 

thing of the past, arte revived again, Packer to operate on this 12 per 

and Noah Zimmerman started the cent - margin. Out of it he must pay 

ball rolling by having one last week. a11 operating costs, transportation, 

J. P. Tanner, our genial mail car- taxes » interest on borrowed monoy 

rier, divided his route a few days ? nd a return on the money invested 

last week, giving his sub. a portion m the DusineM - 

of the mail to deliver on account of There are very few "scofflaws" in 

the condition of the roads. 1 Burlington. What is a scofflaw?. it 

Saw J. W. Quigley and he said h ; j is ' as we take **' a newIv coined 

new house is about finished and he word *° de9Crib e men who drink un- 

expects to move into it in a few dayr. lawful liquor. The English language 

He has everything nicely arranged was enriched wJ th the new word to 

and has all modern conveniences carry a high v °ltasre of scorn, for 

Mrs. Belle Northcutt (nee Dob- k h, ° h WM awarded a * 2( X> P™, 

bins) a highly respected lady kdon S£* S^f ™ ld «™ u > the *™ 

Wednesday of last week the 22nd £?XJ?X *? name ' .. We 

inst. The f uneral services were con- £ y th at there are not ma ny "acof- 

durted-b^ Rev. Baker at the Mt. £ T l "'1 B u }} ll ** u ' Nu ' ll re e7W 

Zion M. E. church on Friday she ?!f, rly » aU " tlll » are 8tilled and 

having united with th^t church early I"* £& >°? n 8neds ita »*• " f 

in life, and was a faithful memtr t^X £*?£ "'Jf*'™'* ^' 

for a great many years as she had * ? 1 at the cold weat her is 

passed the 75th /ear o^er Wrth an " 0t ada » t6d to >* d ^^tion. 
niversary. After the funeral services 
the remains were taken to Hopeful 
and placed in the vault to await final 
interment Two sisters, Mrs. Nannie 

Hammond and Mrs. Columbus Snow, Country people can be urged to 

and two brothers, James Dobbins, of ma e their homes more attractive 

near Richwood, and Wm. of near * or manv reasons. It can be argued 

here and a host of friends shrvive to that the P ro P ert y thereby becomes 

mourn her departure. C. Scott Cham- more valuab l« and salable, and the 

Kov-o UnA «!.- -m At _ m . nPtl.Pr innaa»>«iAA - "■ aJ . *_ 



HAMMER SALE— For household 
use only. No use to carpenters, but 
GOOD FOR THE PRICE. Special at 
33c till 6 p. m., Feb. 6th. Don't misa 
it. Hope Conner, Florence, Ky. 



FOR RENT 

Ground for corn and tobacco, with 
or without tenant house. Renter to 
have own team and tools. • 

SNYDER BROS., 

Phone Bur. 184. Bullittsville, Ky. 



SOjan — 4t 



' For Sale— Barred Rock Cockerels. 
Fine barring. Bred to lay. Mrs. B. C. 
Graddy, Burlington, Ky., R. D. 1. 
Consolidated phone No. 255 

For Sale— No. 12 DeLawaFcreain 
S«,arator — used a short time. Fred 
Morris, Burlington R. D. 2. 
It 



FOR SALE 

Two good heating stoves. 

1 Kitchen Range. 

2 Wardrobes. 
2 Bureaus. 

2 Bedsteads. 
Barrel spray pump. 
Apples. 

B. T. KELLY, 

Burlington B. D. 2. 

ofeb7 — 2t 

Our stock of sleds is complete: 1 
horse $10.00; 2 horse $23.00. See 
our jumper plows; 1 horse $8.00; 2 
horse $12.50. Light shovel plows 
$6.00. Order now. Pay on or before 
April 20, 1924. CONNER & KRAUS, 
Florence, Ky. Agents: Walton Lum- 
ber Co., Walton, Ky. and Aubrey 
Finn, Burlington, Ky., Route 1. 

For Sale — Cow and calf. L. C. 
Brown, Burlington, Ky. 
It 



Public Sale. 



Having decided to quit dairying I will offer for sale at my resi- 
dence on the East Bend and Waterloo Pike, near 
Waterloo, Boone County, Ky., on 

Saturday, Feb. 2/24 

The Following Property : 

One 3-year old Mule, 3-year old Government Stallion, 2 6-mos. 
old Jersey Heifers, 6-mos. old Jersey Bull, 3 2-year old Jersey 
Heifers to be fresh ia April, 8 Jersey Cows to be fresh from now 
until last of April, 2 Jersey Cows fresh now, 2-year old Jersey 
Bull, 8 Shoats, Duroc Boar, Brood Sow, Road Wagon, Spring 
Wagon, share in Silo Cutter, 36 joints of Meat, 18 Sides si 
Meat, 30 gallons of Lard, and other articles. 



TERMS OF SALE 

All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; ovev* 1A 00 a credit of 
nine months, note with approved security, payable at Peoples 
Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. No, property removed unbX 
terms are complied with. 

Ernest Brown. 

Sale to begin at 12 o'clock (noon ) 



THE ATTRACTIVE COUNTRY- 
HOME. 



FOR SALE OR TRADE 

Confectionery and soda fountain, 
doing good businecs, corner stand, 8 
rooms, low rent, or will trade for 
farm, give or take difference. 

48 Elm Street, 
Ludlow, Ky. 
(Phone S. 2691-X.) 



31jan— tf 



NOTICE 



bers had charge of the funeral. 

SERVICE MAN MADE 
RESIDENT COUNSEL 
FOR BURLEY POOL 



better appearance advertises their 
business. Much can be said also 
about the effect upon the owners it 
possessing an attractive home. 

The man who is tired and discour. 
aged by the difficulties of life, ia af- 
fected by his home conditions. If 

is 



The Burley Tobacco Growers' Co- 
operative Association has secured t'te hl8 l">me is poorly kept up he 
services of Robert H. Hays, former depressed by this decadent 'environ 
serviceman and a lieutenant in the "»ent. It makes him feel that he 
officers' reserve corps, as resident ha s been a failure in life, and it 
counsel, with offices in the associn- takes the heart out of his effort 
tion buildings, 620 South Broadway. But if he has taken pains all along 
Mr. Hays, who for the past two to make his home more attractive, 
years has been practicing law at outside and in, it has a rasxtening 
Lancaster, has moved to Lexington influence over him. He foals that 4e 
and is residing in South Broadway has accomplished results in tho past 
Park - land will do so again. 



Persons having claims against the 
estate of Washington Utz, deceased 
must, present them to me those In- 
debted to said estate please oome 
forward and settle same. 
J. C. UTZ, Erlanger, Ky. 

Lost— Tire on rim for Ford car, 
Baturlay, Jan. 26, between Florence 
and the corner of the T. A. Huey 
home-place on Big Bnnepike. Find- 
er pleaxe leave at Myers Motor Co., 
Florence, and receive reward. 

Rev. O. Q, Til lman. 

Wanted— To rent, farm; experienc- 
ed farmer w*nte to rent Al farm 
ralne crop, stook on shares, must 
have good hi use on hlvh way near 
town. Address Boa 802 Crittenden. 
Ky- It pd 



FARM FOR RENT 

Farm of 136 acres will rent on the 
shares, 10 cows, tobacco and corn 
ground, nice new four room house 
to good tenant. Also for sale 75 
ewes. Apply to 

H. L. McGLASSON, 

ol6jan — pd Hebron, Ky. 

Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. I.) Put Up 
with Rats for Years 

"Yean ago I got some rat poison, which nearly 
killed our fine watch dog. We put up with rata 
until a friend told me about Rat-Snap. It surely 
kills rats, though house pets won't touch it" Rats 
dry up and leave no smell. Prices. 35c. 65c. $1.25. 

Sold and gusnnteed by 
Oulley A Pettit, D. K. Blythe. 

WANTED 

Man to raise three or four acres 
of tobacco and work by the day. 
House, garden and cow pasture fur- 
BifihejL 



Mrs. Grmndall (Iowa) Tolls How! 
Stopped Chicken Losses 

"Last ipring. rats killed all our baby chicks. V _ 
I'd known about Rat-Snap before. With just om 
large package we killed iwsrms of rats. Theywont 
get this year's hatches. I'll bet" Rat-Soap taguaa. 
anteeu sod sells for 35c, 65c. 11.25. « 

Sold and guaranteed by 

Golley A Pettit, Burlingtoh. Ky. 
D. R. Blythe Burlington, Ky. 




C. L. Cropper, Idlewild, Ky. 
24jan— tf 

For Sale— Laundry Queen Electric 
washer 32 volt, almost new. Lopper 
tub, aluminum wringer $150. Ma- 
chine for $76.00. H. R. Leidy, Flor 
ence, Ky. 



WANTED— Man to raise three or 
four acres of tobacco. C. L. Cropper. 
Idlewild, Ky. 17Jan — tf 



TRUCKING 

OF All K1 N P8 DONE flY- 



Walter R. Huey 

FLORENCE, KY. 

Prices Reasonable. * Ci v Me a Trial. 

Phone 416-X 



WANTED— Good tenant or hired 
man to raise crop on shares, marrisd 
man prefered, house and garden 
furnished. Apply to L. A. Scott, De- 
von, Ky. Phone Independence 1768. 
olfeb — 4t pd 



NOTICE— See M. B. Rice, Rabbit 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford cars 
and Ford Tractors. 



Quite a Nest Egg. 
We are told that Everett Hale one* 
opened a hank account with 4ft centa tf a|19#| Pflf flwVilli 
Well. 46 cents at that time was a •■•** ' 
tidy bit of money. 



It is said the White House needs 
many repairs, but so far no presi- 
dent has o..ered to do It in his spare 
time. 



Medicine Z'HJ°^" H - 

rid your system of Catarrh or Deafness 
caused by Catarrh. 

SjOi S_ Jfmmmjitt /ll J I J J HI Man 

P. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, Ohio 



NOTICE. 

All persons indebted to Thomas 
Corcoran, deceased, will please come 
forward and pay same. All persona 
having claims against said estate wit 
present same proven as the law re- 
quires. 

MICHAEL CORCORAN?, 

_____^_ Executor. 

WANTED— To rent farm— wfll 
rent on the share or money rent — 
prefer money rent, would like farm 
located near school and on good 
road, one that will do for dairy farm 
and some good tobacco and core 
land. 7 or 8 acres of tobacco and 84 
acres for corn. 

CHESTER HILL, 
Idlewild, Ky. 
o80jan4t — pd 

California haa a millloiTautome- 
blles. That" enough to ruin ait* 
state. ^ 



' > 



a^^^aaa 



i 



tin. i. .. .. ^ - 



* 



PAGE 

All obituaries, card of thanks and 
all other matter, hot news, must be 
paid for at S cent* per line. 



BOONE 



THE FULL PAGE AD 



Bullittsburg Baptist Church, 

J. W. CAMPBELL,, Paator. 
Sunday School every Sunday at 

Regular preaching aervices on the 
FtaiC and Third oundaya a 
at 11:00 a. m. 



HfttOditt Episcopal Churoh. 

REV. P. G. GILLESPIE Paator 

Florence and Burlington Charf • 

FLORENCE 

Third Sundays 11 a. m. 
School 8:S6 a. m. 
(Maw Hattia Mae Bradford, Supt) 
a\»worth League every Sunday at 

(Mat Vamie Robinson, President) 
Prayer meeting Wednesday 7:80. 

BURLINGTON 

Second and ^Fourth^Sundays at 1 1 
a. bl, and 7 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday at !0 
a. m. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 

Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 
m. 



Petersburg Baptist Churoh. 

REV. O. J. CHASTA1N, Pastor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:30 p. m. 

Sunday School every Sunday 10 
a. m. m.— 

Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sunday 11 a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 



Boons Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

REV. CEO. A. ROYER. Paator. 
Sunday Feb. 3rd. 

Hopeful 9:30 a. m., Sunday School. 
Hopeful 7 p. m., Luther League. 
Hebron 1:30 p. m., Sunday School. 
Hebron 2:30 p. m., Meeting of the 

Brotherhood. 
Bbeneser 10:30 ^a. m., Holy Com- 

aaunion. 



Ay the newspaper man looks over 
exchanges coining from various* par f . j 
of the country, he is impressed with 
the great use that is being* made of 
advertising. The advertising spacs 
used in newspapers has greatly in- 
creased. 

Take the big city dailies, for in- 
stance. If you took the newspaper 
which before the war used to ruri 
an average of about 16 pages, the 
chances are that paper will be run- 
ning today from 24 pages to 32. Tho 
enlargement is not primarily due to 
the use of more news, though the 
space given to reading matter has 
increased. The big share of the 
increase iz due to advertising. 

It is interesting also to see how 
many concerns and int*.«>ts there 
are that are taking big ads of a half 
page or full page, or two pages, thai; 
must be very expensive. The trainod 
eye looks over these notices, and It 
can guess fairly near what was paid 
for them. In some papers, of course, 
it is evident that an unreasonably bi,: 
discount has been offered to induce 
some advertiser *to make a bit? 
spurge. But in the majority of case3, 
appearances indicate that the news- 
paper was running its advertisements 
on a strictly proportionate schedule, 
in which the interest of both the 
large and the small advertiser wer;.' 
fairly balanced, and in which cases 
the big advertiser must pay a high 
price for his big splurge. 

The fact that so many concerns 



YOU'RE NOT int. WHOLE 
CIRCUS. 



are willing to put up the money for purposes 

tli R hijr dianW o>,«„,. 1 *».-_'•. Purposes. 



Jack Eddins is still confined to his 
bed. 

Mud roads have been -in fine shape 
this winter so far. 

Mrs. Agness Clore, who has been 
quite sick" for several weeks, is no 
better. ! 

Mrs. Lorena Cropper has rented 
har farm in Bullittsville neighbor- 
hood to Marshall Hall. r~ 

B. T, Kelly's house is Hearing com- 
pletion, and he and his family wll 
soon be residents of Burlington. 

Postmaster Hickman is able to be 
at the Postoffice again, after being 
confined to his home for a week or 
two, 

Richard Marshall out oh R. D. C 
haft, rented a farm at Salem Ridge. 
Ind., and will move there in a short 
tiaae. 

Mike O'Hara, one of the Recor- 
der's good friends of near Erlange^, 
haa been in poor health for sever,- 1 
weeks. 

Most time for the ground hog to 
came out, and he should reflect on 
the high price of meat before stav- 
ing out. 

J. M. Barlow spent several days 
the past week with his daughter, 
Mrs, W. P. Beemon in Gunpowder 
neighborhood. 

From some cause there has not 
been as any public sales advertis- 
ed as there generally are at this 
season of the year. 

A. W» Gaines bought of J. C. 
Mills, one day last week, lots 6, 4, 
and 11 in Graves and Price sub-di- 
vision on Graves Ave., Erlanger. 

On next Saturday, beginning at 12 
o'clock Ernest Brown will dispose of 
bis herd of dairy cows at his resi- 
dence near Waterloo at public sale. 

Mrs. C. C Roberts, if Covington, 
haa been the guest of her brother, 

W. R. Ro gers, and siste^ MJases. 

SalUe and Elizabeth, for several 
days. 

Rev. Paul Gillespie preached at tin 
Burlington M. E. church Sunday 
morning and evening. At the evening 
services a very large crowd was in 
attendance. 

A bill has been introduced in the 
Senate at Frankfort by Senator Le ;, 
of Owen county, for the construction 
of a road from Dam 38 via Burling- 
ton and Florence. 

•J. O. Bonta delivered 6800 pounds 
of his large crops of tobacco to the 
pool at Walton last week. He is one 
of the beat and largest growers of 
the weed m the county. 

On next Monday, county court day, 
the Master Commissioner will sell at 
the Court House door, several pieces 
of property; also the Sheriff will sell 
several delinquent lists. 

January brought nearly kind of 
weather — heavy rains, cold, snow 
and sleet and slush. Ice was so 
good that several ice houses were 
tilled, and the younger set had de- 
lightful times on the ponds and 
creak* — akating. 

Mra. Sarah A. Hayea, u former 
well known Bound county cituun, hut 
now of Brownatown, Ind., aenda'u* 
$1.60 fur another year* aubacni 
Hon to the Recorder. Mra. ilayta, 
who haa been it ctliiau of the "Huu» 
Stata for many years, ia alwav i 
«>u* tu get the new* from It, ■■ 
"OM Kentucky Monti 



thfa big display, shows how thorough 
l.v standardized advertising has be 
come, and how it is depended upon 
for results by those who use it per- 
sistently and with judgment. For- 
sales are being made every day 
through advertising, and by this 
means a multitude of business men 
are rising out of small and inferior 
positions into leadership in the bus- 
iness community. 

ONE-FOURTH OF THE FARMER , 
ARE BANKRUPT . 



No single head is large enough tc I 
contain all the knowledge in the 
\v< rid. Even those whom you regard 
as learned and wise and great don't 
know some things that you know. 
This may startle you a bit, but it is 
as true as preaching. 

It is in this sense that we say. it 
u»kes all sorts of people to make s. 
world, and ihia is the basis of the 
suying that as the people are, so will 
be the v. orld in which they live. 

Some people imagine that in order 
to know a thirg it must ever be on 
the toni, je, or in mind ready to use. 

Tim world is much inclined to cad 
thoB* yroat who have ?.ccomplishcd 
something unusual, and never stop 
to inquire what else »hey may have 
done, or what manner of men they 
are, a.- men go. 

The really great and successful 
lawyer is not the one who can quote 
most law and cite the greater num- 
ber of decisions, although such an 
one is certain to attract much atten- 
tion, and most likely to get his name 
in the papers. 

The really great lawyer is one 
who is well-grounded in the principle 
of law, understands the methods of 
applying the same and is conscien- ' 
tious in his work. Having read, un- ! 
derstandingly, the opinion of other*, ' 
he becomes well-grounded not on'y ! 
in the principle of law generally but I 
understands the purposes and the ' 
methods by which to secure these I 




Senator LaFollette's resolution 
asking that the Interstate Commerce 
Commission be directed to reduc» 
freitf ■-*- ' -~* -._ pre . wcr 
basis, sets forth, in consive form, the 
deplorable condition of farmers in 
the 15 Western States. The resolu- 
tion asserts that freight rates on 
grain and live stock have been in 
creased 47 ptr cent and rates on 
grain for export increased 73 per 
cent. The increased rates apply not 
only to what the farmer sells but al- 
so to what he buys. While the pries 
of wheat and other grains have da- 
creased to pre-war levels freight 
rate continue upon levels establish- 
ed when wheat sold at $2.00 per 
bushel and cotton at 37 cents pe- 
pound. 

According to the records of the 
'Secretary %,! Agriculture farm values 
decreased $13,000,000;000 from Jan. 
1, 1920 to March 1, 1922; 108,000 
farmers have lost their farms thru 
foreclosure; 122,000 have lost their 
property without legal proceedings, 
and 378,000 retain their property 
through leniency of creditors only, 
making a total of 26 per cent of ail 
the fanners of these 15 states who 
are virtually bankrupt. 

The Secretary of Agriculture savs 
that 40 per cent of the farmers of 
South Dakota are practically bank 
rupt; 42 per cent of those in Col- 
orado; 50 per cent in North Dakota; 
51 per cent in Wyoming and 62 per 
cent in Montana. During the year 
1922 over 2,000,000,000 people mov- 
ed from farms to cities, and the 
shortage of adult labor has mado 
child labor necessary. 

These are the main points that 
interest the Western and North- 
western farmers in national legisla- 
tion, and may be said to be the real 
reason for the so-called "radical" po- 
litical sentiment. 



What sensible woman cares for, 
or can love a man whose letters are 
made up mainly of quotations from 
the writings of others? She would 
much prefer to have his own word.-, 
even though unpoetically joined. I; 
is the man himself that she is inter- 
ested in. Letters copied from handy 
letter-writers don't go to the spot 
like those that are written from th'; 
heart out. 

In love, as well as in war, it is 
most esstntial to know the other fel- 
low, for if you don't he is liable to 
fool you, and maybe fool you badly. 

The fellow who is most resource- 
ful is he who reads, desiring to 
know, and to understand, and when 
he learns about a thing, and under- 
stands it, he is prtpared to use it, t-» ' 
best advantage and to discuss its i 
merits most interestinglp'and profit- I 
ably. He is the fellow who can make | 
use of his knowledge. 

A WORLD OF HANF-BUILT 
PEOPLE 



*W «r» #W *U-.«rW Wr W aas a sW+ a as / «** •* 
**•» tkmm mmkf mU'i hmwtl fna4 ««■#•*• 



A New Ford Steel Truck Body 



The Ford Motor Company 
announces the production of a 
new all-steel body and steel 
weather-proof cab, mounted on 
the famous Ford one-ton worm- 
drive chassis, forming a complete 
haulage unit at the remarkably 
low price of $490. 

Steel flare boards and end gate 
wjjh sockets permit the use of 
stakes and high 
side boards or 
the mounting 
of a canopy top, 



7TkiC«r can bt «*— «— ' ttmrngh «*« 



making the body readily adaptable 
fcr general use. Screen sides and 
end doors may easily be installed. 

This new body, built of heavy 
sheet steel strcagly reinforced 
and riveted, is designed to stand 
up under the most severe usage. 
Loading space is four feet by 
seven feet two inches. 

The weather-proof cab ia 
fitted with 
removable, 
doo r-opeoing 

curtains. 



s 

a 



Authorized Ford Dealers 




d&pcC 



CAKS • TRUCKS 

|l m';HyNyjuiiii]iiimiiiiiiiiu^"^i]m»|i(ni^ i !y[ji. > ; '"" i |, 'j- i . , |) j|jj| ) .||h mi 



TRACTORS 



NOTICE 

All persons having claims againxl 
the estate of Eugenia Blythe, de- 
ceased, will present same to me prov- 
en as the law requires. All person • 
owing said estate will settle same 
at once. 

A. B. RENAKER, 

Executor 



XK2COURTEsYK3[ 



^ to ffi? IOCS rASlUTYfr flgg 



The world is full of half-built peo- 
ple. If any one doubts this, let j 
him or her visit a Turkish bath, and i 

nqte thenumber of people who are Will S. Norris is practicing what 
flat m the chest, round in the back, he preaches (improve your stock wi,h i 



ponderous as to paunch and heavy 
in the jowl — people with outstand I . 
ing shoulder blades and flat feet. 
Out of a thousand people in this 
country, there could be found scarce- 
ly three who have really fine figures. 
And why is this so? Why are 



better sires) by bringing into Boon-, 
county the best Rex Peavine Stallion 
that could be found. He will be hand- 
led by our well known horseman 
Walter Riddell near Hebron. Thj 
sires of this horse are Rex Peavine, 
by Rex McDonald, by Red Denmark, 



A Solid Foundation 

This bank is built on a solid foundation of a large 
Capital and a Large Surplus which speaks SAFETY 
for your deposits. 

We want to do business with you and you will 
find that we "Do things for our Customers." . .. • , , 



Sheriff Hume and Deputy L. T. 
Utz were called by telephone Satur- 
day night from Devon where th ?y 
were info rmed that a party of ne- 



groes had entered the home H. Mid- 
dendorf and that they were intox- 
icated. When they arrived thev 
found one negro man laying on the 
roadside so drunk that he could not 
get up and near him was & grip in 
which was two gallons of moonshin.. 



there so few people in this country, I by Crigler's Denmark, a well known 
in the civilized world, who havo [ Eeo ne county horse of former years, 
bodies that are not a travesty of Him I Dams are Lady Montgomtry, by 
in whose image they are supposed ' Montgomery Chief, by Bourbon 
to be created? Chief by Harrison Chief. 

The reasons are many, but may I Tms is a great opportunity to rai*<? 

be grouped under one phrase un- ; KOod saddle horses that will continue 

hygienic and unwholesome condition s \ to be in £° od demand. Rexy Chief 
of living. Among these conditions j wei S ns 12 «" pounds, 16 hands high 

may be mentioned dietary errors I a nd W 'H Produce good combined util- 

food that is excessive in quantity, j ,ty and saddle horses, as Rexy has 
variety or frequency as to meals, and' i the bree dmg and individuality. 

food taken under improper condi- " 

tions, either of mind or body. UNIFOMMITY OF DIVORCE 

Another and perhaps the most pert J 
inent cause in the early employment ' 



4 Per Cent 

and taxes paid op time deposits. • 

Capital $ 50.000.00 

Surplus $ 1 00,000. 00 



.1 



Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

C. H YOUELL, President. A. W. CORN, Vice-Pre.ident. 

A. B. RENAKER. Ca.hier. 
"Nett-rfr-Rtwiin, Asst. Cashier. L. C. Beemon, A»»t. Caahier. 



of children in mills, mines and the 
sweat-shops, under-fed, half-starved 
resulting in disease and dwarfed 
specimens of manhood and woman- 
hood. And its only excuse is » 
commercial one — a matter of profit 
to people who are engaged in cutting 
each other's commercial throats un- 
der the law of competition. 



and it was with di culty that they 
were arrested and brought to Burling 
ton where all were lodged in jail" 
charged with being drunk and driv- 
ing an awt-..:obile while drunk, and 
transporting moonshine liquor. Gor- 
don Crawford, Mary Crawford, Willie 
Aronld and Charlotte Arnold were 
the negroes enames, and they lived 
near Crittenden, in the road camp. 
They were before the- County Judf.' 
Monday for a preliminary hearinc 
and the trial will be held this week. 

While they are offering cash prizes 
for peace plans, looney. words, Ac, 
4c, why not offer a prite to the man 
who — 

Can find an easy way to keep ii|> 
the installments on the car; 

Provide weather that will satia'y 
everybody; 

JVrsuade the coal men to ttell ua 
winter fuel at old-time pricea; 

Invent a tire that can he chunked 
without Mopping the flivver; 

hmovor a ru» that will sofUn tl,» 
htarta of profiteering landlords, . . 

Make h motor ear thut \mI| fedf* 
The ilm> un irettuifc- noticaabli 



Gr-eat differences occur in the di- 
vorce law between the various states 
and the couple that can get a legal 
separation in one commonwealth may 
not be able to get it in some other. 
The result must be to make the gen- 
eral practice conform to the states in 
which divorce is the easiest. If peo- 
ple desiring to separate, live in i 
strict state, they will be encouraged 
to seek residence in a state having 
lax laws. , 

If it is wrong to get a divorce in 
one state tor certain causes, the a' I 
rlTJ , 1 f ° r l08SeS in < U! '- is not n '« d « right just by mov ng 

rei n bu t 7osLs%om^ a s yerS t bUS1 ' aCr ° SS 8 State fou »^- " woS!i 

Swreck of oth? ",. I*' » J Seem * 00d P° ,ic >' for th * ™«er M 

shipwreck, or other casualty," and I be thoroughly canvassed bv expert- 

XrTrTwV- ' VT 8 "" ^ With ■ ^i, choosing L^T^ 

others Deductions for losses in that will best protect tteinterest^- 

sale of residence property, bought the family, and that the resuU % 

. jf reselling is n>t such a study should be made the 

:!! rutmo Jit' Same "^ " PP,,ei t0 SUtUte f0 «' the wh0,e —try. 



Under a Treasury ruling inconi.: 
taxpayers nre allo w e d — 1«> — dedtrrt- 



K. M. C. Co. 

BIG SALE 

Ford Heaters $1.10 

Ford Bumpers 3.98 

Fo rd Radia t o r Caps — : — 2.85 



The two women were also very dm™ without intention pt reselling, is n>t ' such a 



If you like to see good pictures 
and enjoy a good show, don't fa.il to 



UNITET ACTION 



It makes a tremendous difference 
in getting things done, whether peo- 
ple act as a unit or separately. The 
groups of rural people that years ago 



attend the Burlington and Peters 
burg Theaters next Friday and Sat- 
urday night. Manager Porter has onr- 
of the best productions for the even- 
ings that has ever been shown. "The 

ner" ^iS^T^K ^ ^ C °T ! seem * d to influ «"" the 

"PaVs££„^^ Thl ' Politicians did 

rat s ratent will well be worth the 

price of admission. Don't let any- 
thing keep you from seeing this 
Play. 



Windshield Wipers .93 

30x3 ) 2 Weed Chains 2 48 

30x3 ,'v Tire and Tube 9 98 

All Supplies Marked Dow n. 

We have some fine bargains in used tires. 

See us before ycu buy. 

Kentucky Motor Car Co., 

325 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

P lease Bring this Ad With Ycu. 



gathered around the corner grocery : _.._ 

stoves and discussed politics; never 1 ™ BURDEN OF PUBLIC DEBT 



CROPS, LIVESTOCK, RURAL LIFE 
ON WETNESDAY, THURSDAY 



Lexington, Ky.—Cropa, livestock 
and poultry talks in the general 
aire ting* an home and school discus- 
sions in the rural life lection iwll tmm 
tu.,. the harm u,ul Home ionvontio, «t.| tt ,t th*) have orgaaiaed 



Wednesday nnd Thursday of 
Week according to it rVPOl I 



this 



country 
not pay 
any great attention to them, because 
they were not organized. 

But you take the same bunch of 
people, and let them form an organ- 
ization und put the influence of tha. 
association behind any movement, 
and they gain power. Their voice U 
accepted in iiifluulrtial circles as th • 
voice of the people. The big powvi 
which the farming and rural ele- 
ments have been glttin^ in politics 
of late, is du« mostly to the fuct thai 

A-nl 



reepja never advartiae thiii lams 

and melchanU *•¥*» adverltse the 

pooi good*, it n„.y bavc *») t i 
Mtiollu'i « 1( > of aayntg keep 

1 wai ti 



pen pie must foin these urganiiatio 

t4 iiiike themselves me t effect i\t 
Sal 

'""Kill* ' .11 ih, 

Sunday, thai would ' 

I !n>., Man. -,, 



The net debt of the United Stat - 
ia nearly $31,000,000,POO of th.^ 
$22,526,000,000 i a the direct (fault 
of war, and nearly one-half qf th.it 
is because of loans to other nation? 
State debts seem to have increased 
175 per cent, during the past ten 
years, and now amount to a bugo 
sum. City and county debts arc ■ 
than $8,000,000,000, an increa« 1 

14 '.> per cent ill 10 years, an. I th 
are rapidlp growing, qi mou 
tax free in order to facilitate 
b oui flotations. Fur every famil 
live (here is $1,11 S.iH) of pul 
with an annual intt ri 
fund ( in t of . b un |gu u 

Ideretj that svai 

people ii\e in 1. us, j ■ 

W> hin the I 



tl. 



SALE OF FIREARMS INCREASES 
CRIME 

Bui few ;;n.cs have news prohibit- 
ive :h*. indiscriminate state of fire- 
ar.'.ta, and i:i i'ios; case.- the la'.vs a- 
prurt.ieaUy n dead letter, Lawmakers 

. : !••■ af the opinion ih.rt a Federal lav 

prohibiting the uutaulaeture of fire- 

a 1 ■ ■"- under gavurnnient con- 

) lirense, woukl be uaconati. 

■ .1" 11 i! It ippeara that the only 
•> ■ ' • tamp out the panecaJ use of 

■us and the increis- 



.1' 



1 Hlinr 



niuiJeis is by soiik'. 
.. and the bill tntn*- 
• I .i»ie(aiul. of Ne'v 

! Ileeli .- 

•11, «n i 
bttlh't 01 . aitiidec 



aaana 



Ss 

aaaaatM 



S..M 



*AGE EIGHT 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



I 



SECRETARY MELLON AND THF. 
DEMOCRATIC TAX REDUCTION 
PLAN. 

Secretary Mellon cannol dispo^i 
of tin- Democratic lax reduction plpi 
by the mere charge that i< > polni 
cal. That is (tic cheap claptrap .>'' 
one kind of politics itself. It is an 
evidence thai the Treasury Depart- 
ment so tar has nut been able to :>' 
tack the Democratic plan upon econ- 
omic grounds or the sound principles 
upon which taxation should be leviec. 
So far Secretary Mellon and the 
chief propagandists oT the so-called 
Mellon plan have relied upon mere 
assertion without a single demon- 
stration of their contentions. The 
Secretary tells the public that if th-_- 
higher surtax rate is cut from 5>> 
per cent tta-25 per cent that it will 
release large sums of money tied up 
in the tax exempt securities for in- 
vestment in industry, but he does not 
tell either how or why that would 
happen. 

As Senator Couzens, Republican, 
of Michigan, has stated, the chancre 
of ownership in tax securities would 
benefit nobody and have no egeet 
whatever upon business. 

Secretary Mellon has not stated 
that indu s t r y needs monep and can . 
get it. On the contrary, the facts are 
that every bijr industry in the coun- 
try, largely by reason of the favor- 
itism it receives through the Fordney 
tariff is either declaring an extra 
dividend, like the Steel Trust, ar ad- 
ding a hundred million of dollars to 
its gross income, as the Packing 
Trust lirm of Swift & Co., did for 
last year. 



RADIO TALK ON CHILD HEALTH 



. Dr. Juanil.i Mc F. Jennings, Ansist- 
int Director, Bureau of Child Hy. 
cienr. State Board of Health. 



THE HOME PAPER. 



Every country editor who is 
worthy the name wants to help in ec- 
ery movement for the good of the 
community. Yet he must draw a line 
at times between legitimate news and 
editorial support and advertising 
which should be paid for. Frequently 
his attitude is misunderstood. Par- 
ticularly perplexing to the editor is 
the matter handed him for printing, 
which by no stretch of the imagina- 
tion can be considered to be of bene- 
fit to the community, but rather is 
intended to promote some individual 
or commercial enterprise. Once in a 
while even a layman, however, seems 
to get the point of view of the edi- 
tor. These lines, by Bob Adams, 
are called "Bitter-Sweet:" 
The editor sat in his sanctum, and an 

angry man was he, 
For a fellow had brought a column 

of stuff and wanted it print' I 

free; 
A column of stuff that advertised 

a nd- boosted— hhr pri vate ga m e , — " 
But he hadn't the heart to loosen up 

good greenbacks for the same. 
And the patient editor said at la.t, 

although he seldom swore, 
He's be double-danged if he'd be 
stung as oftentimes before. 
"You make me sad, you make <uj 

mad, you make me good and 

weary, 
I'll print you nothing free, by gad, 

but a nice obituary." 
The editor sat in his sanctum at the 

end of a perfect day, 
For six subscribers had brought hard 

cash their honest dues to pay. 
And a man had stopped to praioe 

The News and say with a pleasant 

smile: 
"It ranks with the library, school 

and church in making the town 

worth while. 

From day to day, in every way, it 
better grows and better; 

The way you've worked for a play- 
ground park has made my boy 
your debtor." 

The editor sat in his sanctum, en- 
couraged and elated; 

His head was bald and his bunions 
galled, but he felt appreciated. 



1 iwish to talk this evening to all 
those in Kentucky who have an in- 
j teresf in and who love little children, 
J whether they he father or moth r, 
j big brothers and sisters or teachers 
I We know that it takes all that each 
I one of us can contribute in interest 
and service to give these little peo- 
ple the best chance for spiritual, men 
tal and physical development. We 
want them to have a better chance 
in all things than we had. It is the 
purpose of the Bureau of Maternal 
and Child Health to teach mothers 
how to take care of little children; 
also how to take care of themselves 
before the baby comes into the home 
so that he will not come into lifo 
handicapped because his mother has 
been neglected. His mother must 
have the right kind of food anl ex- 
ercise, and there are many other 
health rules she must obey, if her 
children are to have strong bodies. 

Mothers do not know by instinct 
how to care for children — therefore 
many times they do the sillied: 
things. And isn't it pitiful that these 
little ones, whom they love BO dear- 
ly, will suffer from the parents' up- 
takes? Unnecessary digestive upsets 
come often, from the wrong kind of 
food, or food given too often or a. 
irregular intervals. Or indigestion 
may come from playing too much 
with baby thereby making him ner- 
vous. Some mothers let the baby sue 1 ; 
his thumb which makes adenoids, fr. 
regular teeth and an ugly mouth 
Others will put on too many clothes 
in summer and too few in winter. 
One mother had an eighteen month's 
old baby running about the hous:; 
barefoot in zero weather; he had a 
bad chest cold and she did not know 
that the exposure of his feet an 1 
legs caused his cough. 

Parents want to do the right thing 
and they don't know how. Please 
write to us about your children and 
we will give you the most up-to-date 
information on the subject of child 
hygiene. 



MHE1B 



h 



^-<^ ia ^i 







ii 
A 



Original Saxaphone 90 Years Old 
Played by Tom Brown from W L W 

When Oscar Saxe, a Belgian, in- 
vented his musical instrument which 
is now called a Saxaphone, he little 
thought that ninety years after- 
ward music from it would be played 
in Cincinnati from W L W. broad- 
casting station and possibly heard 
throigh radio, in the town of its cre- 



ation. Some year = ago, Dr. Wagne. 
purehesed this instrument from the 
No?wegian oGvornment and had it 
in h ; s Omaha home for some time. 
When Tom Brown, creator of the 
saxaphone band, visited that city, 
the original aSxe instrument valued 
at $50,000 was given to him by the 
doctor. This saxaphone is used in 
every performance given by Tom 
Brown in the Julian Eltinge — Tom 
Brown "Black and White Revue of 
1924." 

When the Tom Brown aggrega- 
tion played in Cincinnati at the 
Grand Opera House, they were visit- 
ors to the W L W studio of The Cros- 
ley Radio Corpooration and through 
the courtesy of Henry Fillmore, lead- 
er of the local Syrian Temple Shrine 
Band, gave a midnight concert. This 
was the first time that Tom Brown 
and the original Brown Brothers sax- 
aphone sextette ever played for a 
radio audience and the telegrams 
and letters which were received were 
most enthusiastic. One of the most 
prized telegrams came from Doctor 
Wagner who presented the original 
Saxaphone to the leader of the band. 
. He heard Tom Brown play a solo on 
the instrument. w 

la addition to the saxaphone band, 
Julian Eltinge, famous impersonator 
of femininity, sang and spoke to hi* 
friends throughout the country an J 
received everal messages from them. 



FARMERS ENCOURAGE GROUP 
BUYING. 

The Farm Labor Union of Amer- 
ica is attempting to arrange with 
local trades unions a system of di 
i-ect co-operaVive buying as a mears 
of giving the producer a better 
market and the consumer a lower 
post It is pointed out that a bale 
of cotton sells for $100, but made 
into shirts it sells for about $5,000. 
B*st eabbage sells for $7 per ton; 
cost of. freight and icing to Chicago 
jumps it to $42. The consumer pays 
$140. The differenie, $98, goes to 
the speculatoss and dealers, and 
this seems to apply to most of the 
farmers' produition. 

The Farm Labor Union has 3,000,- 
000 and they are backing the Morris- 
Sinclair bill to create a government 
marketing and corporation to buy 
farm products and ell them here and 
abroad. Most of the farmers of this 
country are keeping cost systems, 
and they have discovered the reason 
why buildings and equipment deter- 
iorate, and the mortgage is foreclos- 
td. It is estimated that a hundred 
thousand of them will go into bank- 
ruptcy this year because it is utter- 
ly impossible to meet their obliga- 
tions. 

FOOD PRICES GOING UP 



Roup Can Be Prevented 
by Providing Dry House 

Koii|i can be prevented by keeping \ 
the poultry iu dry, well ventilated ' 
houses and feeding balanced rations. I 
Under such conditions If a case ap- ' 
pears the bird should be killed and 
burned or burled deeply, says a writer 
In Successful Farming. Treating a 
ease of roup Is very discouraging. 
The bird with roup Is suffering ex- 
treme prostration and the discharges 
from the disease have a repulsive odor. ; 
This odor Is the factor that determines 
wlwgher the hen has roup or a simple 
cold. 

If a hen has a cold it Is only a few 
steps to. a case of roup. Isolute hens 
Willi running eyes and treat them with 
oae of the coal tar disinfectants or a 
cimiuifreial roup remedy. Place per- i 
manganate of potash in the drinking 
water to keep the disease from spread- 
ing. Color the water a deep red. Never 
return » bird with a cold to the l!"tk 
until she Is thoroughly cured and looks 
like B healthy, Vigorous specimen. 

We know of one case where a hen 
w;is treated for roup and then liber- 
ated before a cure had resulted. In 
about a week, eight other liens in the 
Rock were sick with the disease, and 
after another week of fussy unpleas- 
ant doctoring, all Of the sick liens had 
to be killeil to protect the remainder 
of the flock. 

A hen which has had a severe cold 
should be bunded so she will not be 
Included in the breeding pens the next 
year. When the disease has progressed 
until it results in roup the bird Is 
weakened and more subject to a repeti- 
tion of the disease. This trouble is 
so serious when once started that the 
owner of a good flock of poultry must 
not hesitate to sacrifice the best-look- 
ing hen In the flock if she contracts 
the disease. It Is necessary to protect 
the balance of the flock and prevent a 
serious financial loss. 




According to an analysis of the 
food index of the United States De- 
partment of Labor, the cost of fam- 
ily food supplies are steadily climb- 
ing, now being 51 per cent, above the 
pre-war level. The highest figure 
reached during 1921 was 52 per cent, 
but decreased to 39 per cent. The 
rise in 1922 was 8.6 per cent, and 
the continued rise ih 1923 was fo lr 
per cent more. New York is high- 
est with 60 per. cent. Boston and 
Washington next with 59 per cent. 
Baltimore and Chicago 57 per cent, f 
Pittsburgh 56 per cent. Salt Lake 
City is the lowest with 52 per cent. 
Eighteen cities had increases over 
the average and nineteen cities .were 
below 



Co-Operative Marketing 

of Eggs Is Profitable 

The farm poultry Hock has been 
made a source of cash Income as well 
as for food for the family by many 
farm women who have learned from 
their agricultural extension agents the 
best methods of poultry management 
and preparation of products for mar- 
ket. The experience of the women of 
Kairhaven (Ga.) community, Is typical 
of the work In many states. These 
farm women, desiring to Improve the 
earnings of their flocks, brought eggs 
to the weekly meeting of the exten- 
sion club, where the home-demonstra- 
tion agent showed them how to grade 
and pack properly for shipment. This 
was continued each week until the 
members were able to do the work 
themselves. They then organized to 
ship their eggs co-operatively, secured 
as customer a grocery store In a near- 
by city, and* according to reports to 
the United States Department of Ag- 
riculture, have been carrying on a sat- 
isfactory business for more than a 
year. 

"New" co-operative egg fnaTReting" as- 
sociations organized in 1922, according 
to reports, bandied 490.000 dozen eggs ; 
In 1921 some 400 new organizations 
handled about 200,000 dozen eggs. 

All Hens Show Decided 

Preference for Wheat 

A recent test at one of the state ex- 
periment stations provided certain 
amounts of various feeds for the hens, 
and what they left was carefully 
weighed back In an effort to see which 
foods the hens preferred naturally. 

Almost all the hens showed a de- 



(>c\ 1U23, Wwtern Ntwupapcr Union.) 

No man e.tn be wise on an empty 

Mloniueh. — (iuurg-e Kllot. 

EVERYDAY GOOD THINGS 

Cook one-half cupful of celery, one- 
half cupful of cabbage and one-third 
cupful of carrot, 
cut Into small 
pieces, and two 
onions, thinly 
•Heed, In one- 
third of a cupful 
of butter ten min- 
utes, stirring con- 
atantly. Add 
three-fourths of a cupful of stale bread- 
crumbs and one quart of boiling wa- 
ter, cook until the vegetables are soft. 
Add one pint of hot milk and rwo ta- 
blespoonfuls of chopped parsley. This 
makes a good vegetable soup. 

Smothered Round Steak. — Try out 
three slices of fat salt pork, add one 
sliced onion and "cook until the onion 
Is brown. Add a two-pound slice of 
steak, sear on both sides. Add one 
and one-half cupfuls of cold water, 
bring to the boiling point, ndd salt 
and pepper and simmer until the meat 
la tender. Remove the steak and 
strain the stock; there should be a 
cupful— this is used to make the 
gravy. 

Steamed Ginger Pudding. — Cream 
one-third of a cupful of butter, add 
one-half cupful of sugar, one egg, well 
beaten. Mix and Rift two and one 
fourth cupfuls of flour, three ten- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one-rourth 
teaspoonful of salt and two teaspoon- 
fuls of ginger; add alternately with 
one cupful of milk to the first mixture. 
Turn Into buttered mold and steam- 
for two hours. Serve with any de- 
sired sauce. 

Squash Pudding. — Mix one-half cup- 
ful of sugar, one and one-fourth tea- 
spoonfuls of salt, one teaspoonful of 
cinnamon, add two and one-fourth cup- 
fuls of steamed, strained squash, the 
yolks of two eggs, slightly beaten, | 
and two and one-fourth cupfuls of hot 
milk ; then add the whites of two eggs, 
beaten stiff. Turn into a buttered 
mold or pudding dish and bake in a 
moderate oven until firm. Serve hot 
or cold. 

Colonial Cabbage. — Tills Is a most 
popular method of serving cabbage. 
Shred a hard bead of cabbage, drop 
Into cold water and let stand to crisp. 
Drain well and add sweet cream, using 
enough to moisten the cabbage well, a 
few tablespoonfuls of sugar and just 
enough vinegar to give zest to the 
dressing. 

LIVESTOCK NOT MONEYBAGS 

FEATURED IN BANK 

«T4TF,MENT 

"We bank on the cow, the sow, the 
ewe, and the hen." 

The First National Bank of Peters- 
burg, N. Dak., has this slogan on its 
unique bank statement recently is- 
sued. ' 

Pict ures of cows, sheep, and sw ims 
rather than moneybags are the decor-' 1 ' 
ations used. On the same page with 
a statement of the bank's financial 
condition is one of the agricultural 
status of the community. 

The report points with pride to 
the improved livestock and diversified 
nature of the farming in the district : 
The 6,000 breeding ewes with pure- 
bred rams at the head of every flock, 
the 60 purebred bulls, the 100 or 
more registered cows besides a great 
number of high-grade females, the 
large acreage of Grimm alfalfa, th 
$51,000 worth of 



FORD BATTERIES 

$15.50 

Guaranteed One Year. . 



Don't fail to give us a trial, for wc have won- 
ful values for yom' money in all size batteries. 

Recharge Battery Repair 



K 



Dempsey Motor Car Co., 

ERLANGER, KENTUCKY 

Phone Erl. 70-L 



gxssxFs&seoRxsaicKxxxsesBs&si 



C. Scott Chambers 

WALTON, KENTUCKY 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



OF 



SERVICE, TENDERNESS 
AND ALERTNESS. 




fpr business people. 

for professional people. 

tor farmers. 

for every one who wants 
to be considered up to 
date and going strong 

ENVELOPES, LETTERHEADS, NOIEHEADS, STATEMENTS 

jMHBHHaMH 



Printed 
5tatior;ery 

AT THIS OFFICE 



a ver a g e. 



In England the cost is- 77 per 
cent above the prices of 1914. In 
1921 it stood at 99 per cent, and at 
one time in 1920 at 169 per cent. 

The cost of family food in France 
Germany, Italy, Poland, Russia, and 
in fact all European countries, are 
comparatively higher than in the 
United States, and that fact has a 
tendency to increase the coats here, 
under the law of supply and demand. 

THAT POSTOFFICE DEFICIT 

The Postmaster General's annual 
report shows an increase in receipt) 
during 1923, of nearly 10 per cent, 
an increase in clerical force of 
about 2.5 per cent, in carrier force 
of 1.64 per cent. Notwithstanding 
this increase and saving at the ex- 
pense of service, the expenditures 
over revenues amounted to $24 - 
023,041. Whenever the representa 
tivea of the taxpayers in Congress 
have the courage to charge the big 
magazines a rate sufficient to meet 
the cost of that transportation to 
the government, something like 172 - 
000,000 will be saved to the depart- 
ment At present the postofflce de- 
partment is distributing for these 
advertising publications at the ex- 
pense of the people. And some of 
them violate the rule in selling their 
publications below the cost of the 
white paper. It* a subsidy, pur? and 
simple. 



f 



worth of produce shipped 

out during the past year, and the ac- 

clded 1 preference for wheat, which Is umM of the ^te^,,; Liveato . k 

Shipping Association which handled 
30 cars of livestock last year. 

The officials of the bank have be? w . 
active in cooperating with the United 
States Department of Agriculture in 
encouraging the use of purebred sires 
and in general livestock improve 
ment. 



SEE DOR 1924 

HUDSON & ESSEX MODELS 

All Essex are 6-Cylinder and built by the 

HUDSON MOTOR CAR CO. 

t 

Hudson Sedan . . . ; 2,020.00 

Hudson Coach 1,585.00 

Hudson Speedster 1 ,470.00 

Hudson 7-Passenger $1,525.00 

Essex Coach 6-Cylinder 1,060.00 

Essex Touring 6-Cylinder : 930.00 

Above prices are delivered. 

B. HUME, 

25 E. Fifth St., Covington, Ky. 



generally used as a poultry feed. Kaffir 
stood next In popularity, followed by 
corn and eornmeal, but oats, bran and 
sunflower seeds did not prove very 
popular. Alfalfa leaves were also 
passed by pretty generally. 

A similar test showed that the use 
of either beef scrap or sour milk makes 
the hen's egg record at least twice as 



good as though she were fed no animal 
feed whatever, and that sour milk Is 
slightly better than beef scrap for this 
purpose, In addition to being cheaper 
and easier to get on most farms. 



Proper Care of Poultry 
Is Apparent in Autumn 

Now is a time when the good care 
of poultry shows up. The flocks which 
have been underfed through the sum- 
mer are not ready for winter laying. 
The pullets which have had a balanced 
ration have developed plenty of vigor. 
The poultry keeper who has neglected 
his flock cannot hope to make up foi 
lost time The best of rations will 
help to improve the poorly-fed flock, 
but they wul never equal the blrdi 
that have made a rapid normal growth 
from the start. 



Dispose of All Fowls 
Weak and Lacking Vigoi 

Cull all hens that are sick, weak, 
Inactive, lacking In vigor, poor eaters, 
with shrunken, bard, doll or whitish- 
colored comb ; small spread or dlatanc« 
between rear end of keel and pelvir 
bones; full, Arm, or hard abdomen 
and those that have molted or begun 
to molt In August or September. Id 
breeds having yellow legs and skin 
the discarded hens should alao show 
yellow or medium-yellow legs and yel- 
low beaks and vents. 



MAPLE-SUGAR MAKERS, 

DO YOUR TAPPING EARLY. 




GAIr" 



Makers of maple sugar have lore 
half and even more of their crops 
many seasons by not being prepared 
for the first runs, says the U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture. It is a 
goid policy to tap early in the sea 
son, not only in order to obtain the 
earlier runs of sap but also because 
these early runs are generally the 
sweetest and therefore the best sugar 
producers. 

All sugar makers are familiar with 
"sugar weather." In general, the sea- 
son is ready to open during the mill- 
die or last part of February in the 
southern sections and later in the 
northern ones, when the daps are 
becoming warm, the temperature go- 
ing above 32 degrees F., and the 
nights are still frosty. If the days 
are very bright, warm, and sunny 
the sap starts with a rush, but soon 
slackens. A high wind, warm spell, 
or a heavy freeze checks the flow, 
but the return of seasonable weather 
cauaes it to start again. 

Records of opening and closing 
dates kept in an Ohio sugar camp 
show the opening season as early is 
February 13 in, 1891 and 1906. The 
latest opening date recorded was 
March 27 in 1886. The number of 
days of flow varied from 9 to 60, 
the average being about 30 days. 



Cincinnati Daily Enquirer 



—AND- 



The Boone County Recorder 

YOU CAN GET 

Ml lor $5.00 WEAR 



Send Your Subscriptions to the 

BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 

Burlington, Ky. 



•♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦eeeeeeeeeee »♦♦•»»»»»•♦»♦»•••»♦♦♦♦+»»+ 

ARE YOU A READER OF THE RECORDER? 

If Not Try It Oije year. 

af-Don't Pall to Read All The Adas inThun Mu# .^, 
»oe»»»»e»»«»e»»oooo»so**e+ »e>e««eeeeeeeeeeeee«eeeee« 



- 



■ . 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



Vcfl. XXXXVI I I I 



Established 1675 



BURUNGTON, KENTUCKY, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1924 $I.5T Per Year 



No I a 



HIGHWAYS NOT BUILT 

BY RULE OF THUMB 



"Ockmically Trained Men in Demand 
For Road* 



In the early days of road building, 
any contractor who could spread 
stsjna and roll it 7u good enough to 
"engineer" the road to be built. To 
day all organizations engaged in 
raad building are looking for the 
trained road engineer, and when 
than are not enough to go round, 
sending their own men to college 
fei better training in highway build- 
ing. 

In 1919 the Uivnersity of Michi- 
gan, which has departments of High- 
way Engineering and Highway Trans 
pert (Professor Arthur H. Man ch- 
ard) offered graduate short period 
Cannes in highway engineering and 
highway transport, leading to the 
degree of Master of Science or Mas- 
ter of Science in Engineering, ar- 
ranged especially for men engage J 
ia the practice of highway engineer- 
ing and highway transport. 

In 1919-20 the attendance was 29; 
while in 1922-23, 110 men attended 
these courses, the average age of the 
■sen being 27 years, ranging from 
28 to 66 years. These men came 
from the U. S. Bureau of Puglic 
Beads, state, county, and municipal 
highway departments contractors' or- 
ganizations companies manufactur- 
ing motor trucks, highway machinery 
and materials, universities, and from 
the field of highway transport. Dur- 
ing 1928-24 18 graduate short perinl 
courses will be offered, 10 in the 
held of highway engineering and 8 
in highway engineering and 8 in 
highway transport. These courses 
wBI be given by a staff of 8 pro- 
fessors and 10 non-residents ectur- 
ers. 

The road building world is looking 
to the engineer, the trained man, the 
technician, for light on how to uuuu 
better, less expensive, more perma- 
nent highways. It is generally recog- 
nised now that the day of the rule- 
of-thumb builder is gone and that 
only the engineer, proficient in the 
art and familiar with the best prac- 
tice, is the economical spender of 
the taxpayer's money! 

It is not only essential to build a 
hard road if highway transportation 
is to be possible; it is necessary to 
keep it open to traffic. There is no 
economic difference between a brok- 
ea-down bridge and a three foot fall 
of snow, as far as stoppinb traffic is 
concerned. There is no economic 
difference between a road blocked 
with a faUan Mulder or tree and one 
which is snowed under so that neither 
team nor truck can travel over it. 

Few communities would wait art 
instant to repair the bridge, or re- 
move the boulder or tree; the idea 
that the hundreds of thousands of 
dollars invested in the good road 
should lie ilde, and a whole section 
be cut off from the benefits of trans- 
part, until the bridge mended itself, 
the boulder rolled off, or the tree 
rotted away is obhorent. But amny 
communities regard a heavy fall of 
snow as a visitation of Providence, 
with which man need not interfere, 
because in time the same Providence 
will melt the snow and open the 
road I 

In regions where snow blocks the 
roads, modern engineers are using 
rotary snow ploughs, attached to 
trucks, and opening the road as soon 
as it closes, exactly as the railroad 
right of way men keep the tracks 
.open for trains regardless of the 
state of the weather. 

Rotary ploughs to be applied to 
trucks are not expensive; push and 
scraper ploughs for lesser snowfalls 
are still less costly. Opening the road 
for tra c after a snowfall is as es- 
sential as meiding bridges and main- 
taining the surface. Comm unities in 
the snow belt which do not have the 
benefits of their good roads all thi: 
' year 'round "save at the spiggot to 
lose at the bung hole," since the 
monetary value of one day's lost 
traffic is more than sufficient to buy 
the equipment and keep the snow 
bound road open all winter. 

THE HOSPITABLE HOME 



STATE PROVIDES 
FREE EDUCATION 
FOR SIGHTLESS 

Movement Started to Bring Evory 

AvaiUhU Child into Kentucky 

School for tb. Blind 
NO COST IS ATTACHED 



Life in many country towns is 
made more attractive to young peo- 
ple by the presence of homes to 
which they can always go evenings 
and find life and enjoyment. Some 
homes are forbidding, and if there 
are young folks there, they seem re- 
pressed. 

Other homes become naturally cen- 
ter* for young life. If there is an 
evening when the young crowd have 
little to do, the boys and girls know 
that they can drop in at this hos- 
pitable center, and pass a pleasant 
evening. Many are the groups that 
gather around the piano for singing 
in such homes, or that start up the 
phonograph for a little dancing. A 
home ( of that kind where there is 
life and gaiety will do more to make 
young people contented with coun- 
try life, than a course of lectures on 
rural conditions. 

Claimed country life is too monol 
etoua, and it may be to thoae who 
* • .*t take part in aoclal life and who 
abut their sfea to ths beauUe* of n . 
tare 



In line with other progressive 
states Kentucky is doing its part for 
the education and industrial im- 
provement of its sightless children, 
and maintains at public expense thi 
Kentucky School for the Blind, at 
Louisville, which ranks among the 
best of such institutions in this coun- 
try and is recognized the world over 
for the high standard it has attained 
for over tbreelquarters of a centus/ 
of its existence, it geing a pioneer 
in the work of educating the blind. 

Strange, as it may appear, th-it 
although the State has provided so 
liberally for their education without 
cost in an institution of such excel- 
lence, conducted by an egcient corps 
of teachers and equipped with every 
appliance for the work, a problem 
that has always been confronted 
has been the fact that only about half 
of the blind children in Kentucky 
are taking advantage of the great 
opportunty afforded them to receive 
a splendid education and become self 
sustaining. It is to meet these con- 
ditions, that the press and public 
are urged to co-operate in a move- 
ment to bring into the school for 
the coming session the full quota of 
blind children. 

The Kentucky School for the blind 
is not to be confounded with an asy- 
lum or hospital for the treatment cf 
defective eyes, it being in the strict- 
est sense a public school for those 
ueniea attendance at the ordinary 
schools. From the kinlergarden to 
the graduating class, the same high 
educational standard prevails, an-1 
in addition, the boys are taught sev- 
eral lines of industrial work, and the 
girls, domestic science and needle- 
work, in which amazing progress 
has been made by the pupils. 

Every blind child in Kentucky, or 
any child whose sight is so weak as 
to prevent it from attending an or- 
dinary school, can get a free educa- 
tion at the Kentucky School for the 
Blind. 

The school session is from the sev- 
ond Wednesday of September to the 
second Wednesday of June, and th:- 
children all go to their homes for 
the summer vacation. 

There are separate scrools for the 
white children and for the colored 
children, some distance apart, each 
with its own set of teachers. The 
State has endeavored to make these 
schools everything .they should he 
for the education, health and com- 
fort of the blind children of Ken- 
tucky. The buildings are large and 
beautifully situated and filled with 
every possible device for the train- 
ing of the blind, and the teachers 
are the best that can be had. 

To get a child into the School, t? 
is only necessary to write to th? 
Superintendent of the School, the 
name of the child and its age, thv» 
name of its parents and their post 
office address, and to state whether 
the child has a sound mind and is 
free from disease. Upon receipt of 
such information, an application 
blank will be gladly furnished. 

There is no charge for board or 
tuition; and if the child is destitute, 
railroad fare and clothing will be 
furnished if a certificate is received 
from the County Judge stating th s 
fact. 

For further information write to 
CL1FFORT B. MARTIN. Sunt 



MORE TAX-FREE PEOPLE 

—LESS TAX-FREE BONDS 

Nothfng is more constructive that 
the recommendation to Congress Vby 
President Coolidge that tares be 
scaled down and that the issuance 
of tax-free bonds be stopped. 

The people demand relief from 
taxes and they are not concerned 
whose plan is accepted whether- it ha 
that of the^Republicans or that of the 
Democrats, just so that the plan 
adopted shal accomplish the mon 
in tax reduction. 

The people realize that a heavy 
sur-tax on Urge incomes not only 
diverts to the public treasury large 
sums which might better be turned 
into the channels of commerce and 
industry but that in the ultimate end 
this burden finally falls on the shoul- 
ders of the consumer. 

. The people are just as insistent on 
'the discontinuance of tar-free bonds 
the purchase of which affords inves- 
tors an opportunity to escape tax 
burdens entirely while others less 
fortunate must bear this burden in 
addition to their own, a condition 
so devoid of justness and fairness as 
to effect its one condenmnation. 

Both these reforms have been put 
before Congress in a way that per- 
mits of no evasion of responsibility. 
It is up to Congress to act. Failure 
to act for whatever reason will pre- 
cipitate such a revulsion in the pub- 
lic mind that those responsible, 
whether they be the "blocs" or other 
"round robins," may well prepare 
for condign retribution at the hands 
of a betrayed electorate. 

President Coolidge has recom- 
mended nothing more than tax-dis- 
tressed people are entitled to. Noth- 
ing less will be satisfactory. The 
people endured war burdens pateienl- 
ly and patriotically. With each suc- 
ceeding year they now not only ask 
but rightly demand that these bur- 
dens be lifted from their shoulders 
to the extent that an economical ad- 
ministration of public affairs makes 
possible. 

Let us have nore tax-free people 
and less tax-free bonds. 



GETTING ANT EARNING 



The country is full of people who 
are ambitious to get more money. 
oThey s.re thinking up all kinds oi' 
schemes and projects to 'achieve that 
aim. But not so many folks are 
thinking out means by which th.y 
can earn more. That is quite a dif- 
ferent thing. 

Earning a thing, is to merit it by 
service or exertion. Many persons 
g«*t money who don't earn it. But 
people who get money by uck or 
smart practice rather than merit, are 
not always able to keep it. Thos.- 
wno earn good fortune by good 
work are apt to keep it, as it comes 
as a result of solid merit. Such per- 
ble, and the world pays a high price 
for their services. 

If people are ambitious to have the 

use of more money, the way to get it 

is to plan out ways for earning it. 

If they deserve and merit i,t by their 

good service and and exertion, it is 

i pretty sure to come. 

I A person's value in the market is 

! dependent largely on the amount of 

j supervision that he needs. If he can 

go ahead independently, and acconi- 

: plish a great deal of well done worn 

j on his own initiative, his value i- 

I high. But if it takes a lot of cost- 

I ly supervision to get good work out 

of him, if some one must constantly 

tell him what to do, and do hh 

thinking for him, his value is not 

very t .uch. 

Also his value is reduced by er- 
rors. These may he positive break* 
thai he nmkes which some one else 
has to rake time i-> repair. More 
frequently they ar- , ; u«t errors of 
forgftfulness and fnilure to do 



Kentucky School for the Blind. 

SPELLING BEES 

While people are looking for en- 
tertainment for their winter even- 
ings, they should not miss the pos- 
sibilities of the old fashioned spell 
ing bee. Education is supposed to 
have made great progress in thes<> 
times. Yet some of those wonderful 
old spellers who could stand up a 
whole evening and spell any word 
in the book, would be a match for 
the best product that our most ef- 
ficient modern schoos turn out. 

The old fashioned spelling bee 
would excite more laughter; fun, and 
enjoyment than almost any other 
feature of social life. The crowds 

raid get intensely interested when 
some one or two good spellers would 
be lined up against a whole row of 
indifferent ones. It was great sport, 
it exefted interest in good school 
work, and it is a custom that should 
not be permitted to die out. 

The boys are warned not to over- 
feed the calves, but so far the girls 
have not complained qf being over- 
fed with ice cream. 

Claimed the lountry folks ar •• 
hayseeds, but they are not so seedy 
looking as a lot of city folks. 

Fact that the American people to.it 
faOU, 000,000 last year in worthier 
■> < -iiritlna will encouragv Hon faki* 
promoter* to cultivate this grejt 
market, 



ngs. I he i-mn who strives for" 
j greater prosperity must not require 
J much oversight. His work not merely 
must re correctly done, but he mu*t 
| have imagination s.» he can see al! 
ith© p futilities of-hr« work; 



ABRAHAM LINCOLN 

Born in Hardin county, Ky., the 
12th day of February, 1809 Abra- 
ham Lincoln was elected the 16th 
President of the United States on 
November 6th, 1860. The political 
issue of the campaign was to decide 
the all-important question whether 
slaverp should be allowed to extend 
to evers **£*. -'- -'.„ :;,-«L!ic, or 
should be restricted to the territory 
which it already possessed. Immed- 
iately following the election several 
Southern States made preparations 
for separation from the federal Un- 
ion, and the following February a 
new Confederacy was formed mith 
Jefferson Davis as president. In his 
inaugural he denied the right of anv 
state to secede and this was consid- 
ered as a declaration of war, an 1 
early in April following Fort Sumpt- 
er was attacked, and the Civil Wrr 
was on. 

All over the land the American 
people are observing the anniversary 
of his birth. All sides and periods fit 
Lincoln's life are worthy of study, 
but inasmuch as the great work 
which he did in later life was so mag- 
nificent it totally eclipsed his polit- 
ical life from young manhood until 
he came into national prominence. 
Lincoln, always a man of the people, 
the truest type of American states- 
man was by no means an amateur ,.t 
holding public office. 

Abraham Lincoln is best known for 
his untiring and successful fight 
against slavery. He will always be 
known as the Great Emancipator. 
His record in Congress showe 
that he also favored adjusted com- 
pensation for soldiers and favored 
Federal aid for the construction of 
highways. 

Abraham Lincoln was more-much 
more-than a great lover, great ora- 
' tor, great overcomer, great politic- 
, ian, great champion of the Almighty. 
; He was a good lawyer and a good 
1 dinloroat. a £Ood student of finaace 
! and # fair general, a fair engineer, 
; and a fair poet. But he must have 
• been more to have attracted, enjoy- 
ed, and kept the popular devotion — 
the love of the people as a whole. 
They understood him better, he- 
I cause he had the wisdom of little 
children. He had the directness of 
the child, the truth of the child, th? 
fearlessness of the child, the plain- 
ness of speech of the child, and 
above all this, the forgiveness of t^e 
chjld; and having nil this the "con,- 
■ mon people heard him gladly," even 
; as it is written of Jesus Christ, and 
the same common people when b*» 
died cri«'j in the streets. 
A blend >cf mirth and sadness, smiles 
and tears; 
A quaint knight-errant of th<- 
pioneers; 
i A homely hero, born of star and 
sod; 
A peasant prince, a masterpiece of 
God. 

PLAN TO HELP FARMERS 

The president's suggestion that 
financial interests which rely upon 
the prosperity of agriculture for 
their profits to invited publicly to 
contribute to the relief of the in- 
dustry jarred the conservatives in 
Congress. Back of that, however, .'3 
the still more -unusual proposal, 
backed by Secretary of Agriculture 
Wallace, that the Government raise- 
and stabilize farm product price; 
by what is regarded as a far-reach- 
ing price fixing scheme. This pro- 
vides for a revolving fund of $200,- 
000,000 which shall be used to pur- 
chase surplus farm products for sab- 
at a probable loss abroad, together 
with a provision which shall empowt r 
the President to declare an embargo 
upon prodducts which might com- 
pete. This may apply to all commod- 
ities used on tne farm as well asja- 
bor, and the conservatives 00k up-T 



THE SERVICE OF THE 

COUNTRY TOWNS 

Success ia life depends to a large 
extent on a person's resourcefulness. 
Some people, if given any kind of 
mechanism or tool or appliance, can 
only use it in about one way. If it 
fails to get results, or if new con- 
ditions arise which it does not seem 
to fit, they find themselves helpless. 
They usually have to send to some- 
repair shop and get their appliance 
tinkered at much expense. Frequent- 
ly they thrw away the whole thing 
and buy something new, which may 
give out in just the same way if they 
meet unforseen conditions. 

People of a resourceful nature not 
so easilp stumped. If their tool or 
machine breaks down, or fails t' 
get results, they study into it. They 
see that by adjusting this or the.1 
part, it can be amde to ork and get 
the desired results. 

Country life develops this inge i- 
uity. People are trained to deperd 
more on their own resources an. I 
less on what Apthcr people can do 
for them. They oecomje able to get 
along with things that other people 
had rejected a;: useless. The way they 
will tinker up some ancient and de- 
crepit au'nmobile and make it run 
thousands of miles is often surpris- 
ing. 

A quality of that kind is e\- 
tremely useful in the country as 
large. Boys trained in that kind of 
a school of daily life are what i- 
needed in the industries of today. 

Manufacturers have often said 
that they preferred country boys 
work in their factories, since they 
were more original when it came.tc 
critical situations, and could think 
out ways to avoid difficulties. Hum- 
dreds of thousands of country tra ; -.- 
ed boys are today exercising this In- 
genuity in solving the problems of 
mechanical production, and are hell- 
ing the nation achieve its superiority 
in science and invention. ; 



LOCAL HAPPENINGS 



! 



Our old friend B. F. Crialer, of 
McVille, was a business visitor to> 
Burlington, last Saturday morning:. 
He has sold his farm to R. M. Ajrlor 
and will have a sale of personal 
property on Tuesday, February 19, 
and he and his good wife will move 
to Florence where he has purchased, 
property. Mr. Crista has almost 
reached the four-score mark in the 
journey of life, and although .some , 4 
what feeble, is able to go around a <& 
attend to business. He expects to 
move to his new home about the first 
of March. 



The stipma of graft seems to at- 
tach to a wide circle of nun engag- 
ed in the wosk of prohibition and tts 
enforcement. Day by day the press 
I publishes the sordid details connect- 
i el w »h this work. It is to be hoped 
i that some day the entire business 
I 1. lay be thoroughly and effectively 
cl< ansed from top to bottom, root 
and branch, in the Anti-Saloon Lea- 
l u r ic organization itself and in all 
( the departments of enforcement. 



I.. G. Tanner, one of the 'htfstlinjr 
i young farmers of Hebron neighbor- 
I hood, was a business visitor to Bur- 
lington, last Thursday, and while in 
; town called at this office and enroll- 
ed as one of the^iteeordfr'* joy-rid- ? . 
! ers. Mr. Tanner is a Breeder of fine- 
poultry and has a floek of several' i 
I breeds that are second to^h'otie. He ' 
raid he gathered 1 10 dozen eggs 
from his flock of one hundred hens 
during the month of January! 



CHARLES E. GARNETT 



Charles E. Garnett, aged seventy- 
seven years, one of the good citizens 
; of the north end of the county, died 
at his home in Hebron, Tuesday, Jar. 
28th, 1H2-J, after an illness of severe! 
years. 

Besides his wife, who was Mi — 

Sarah Baker, he. is Survived by nine 

ch'ldien — eight sons and one daug!:- 

te'. jie son dying several years au -. 

The funeral services were held at 

the i.'ebron Lutheran church Thurtv- 

, Jay, Jen. 31, at 2 o'clock, Rev. Roy- 

j er, the pastor officiating After - - 

1 vices the remains were laid to res: 

• in the cemetery at that place. 

Charles Garnett was a big hearted, 
I j.'. vial fellow, and his many friend* 
, over this part of the county are, 
j grieved to hear of his death. 

FINED $35 AND MOSTS 



Wnne.i ('. Cvaves, t ne of our goo ! 
iv, its »f Georgetown, Scott county, 
ends in his renewal for another 
year. This paper has been a welcome 
guest to Mr. Graves'. bome"for-many 
years, and we appreciate his .Ion/; 
patronage. Mr. Graves has . many 
friends and relatives in Boone and 
Kenton counties. The Recorder wish- 
es Mr. Graves many .nore . years of 
health and happiness. 



, The following is from the Eben- 
•.zvr news in ia-t week's Lawrence- 
burg, Ind., Register:,. "Mrs. Ira Ryle 
met with a painful, accident last 
Thursday, when she iell from a hay 
loft and badiy bruised her arm ami 
hand' - ' Ira and his good wife are 
former county citizens, and their 
many friends back in their old home 
county are rotry to hear of^ hot -mis- 
fortune. 



"I. M. Rice, of Waterloo neighbor- 
hood, was a business visitor to th. 
Hub, last ' Friday! He called, at ,th\a- 
Recorder office ond left an ad, ad- 
vertising 85 good stock ewes for sale. 
Mr. Rive has sold his farm of ninety- 
five acre? on the Wateiioontmo*" Mc^ 



HOME OPPORTNUITIES 



It is natural for youth to take fa,- 
distant looks. Many young folks to- 
day look in a somewhat slighting 
way on the town where they ha< ( . 
grown up. They think that far away 
; scenes offer broader opportunities. 

Sometimes they do, for young peo- 
ple of a very exceptional type. But 
in the majority of cases, a youn;» 
person does best in his home envir- 
onment. He knows the ways of h:s 
home people, and how to adjust him- 
self to their personalities, and way* 
of thinking. 

The acquaintance that a yourg 
person has in his home environment 
helps toward success. The youny 
man starting life in some distant 
town must push himself entirely. Ii 
his home town, he has back of him 
whatever of friendship and reputa- 
tion has been created by those who 
went before. It is a big asset. Tin- 
young people should hesitate long 
before throwing it away ami settlinc, 
elsewhere. 

The girl of today may be H bit 
more material in her viawi or Iff,- 
than was her grandmother, but she's 
urn. h mor.« useful She does not dal- 
ly ov«r useless illusions because life 
to h»r 1* a vary real thing. 



the p lan us mm of the mo st r afl i o<»l 
propositions ever presented. However 
its the accepted industrial principle, 
and just at present the temper of th ■ 
people of the Northwest, as well as 
some other parts of th e W est, is n H 
to be trifled with. The farmer's ban'v 
business must be stabilized, and to 
do that the industry must be stabil 
ized. 

RELEASE OF GRIFFIS 

Release of Lieutenant Hoover 
Griffls, whose daring though illegrl 
and ineffectual, attempt to arisest 
and spirit out of Germany and bac< 
to America one Bergdoll of odious 
fame was made last summer, is creJ- 
itable to the Gorman Government. 

Thie news from Berlin is one of the 
increasing signs, that the asperitjo . 
growing out of the war between 
America and Xhe late Imperial- Gov- 
ernment of HFurmany are passing" 
that a more sympathetic understand 
ing is being reached. Reactions 
this country' to Germany's , action 
Willie helpful to the Gcrmtin people 

kt thjs time when Ann-aim is in 
tent upon relieving hungry Gernn,-; 
children, th* intelligence that tb ■• 
Berlin Government has been • bum 
na'nimous toward young Griffi.s will 
not fail to be appreciated on thi 
side of th* Atlantic. 

Stock ipeculaten are afftTi&g tut 

peatloni tp the Hok prize wmnrr 1 
to how tO Invest his money \ 

clan* thes C gentlemen are ahraj 

the , i, t„ diapuaing. at th. 

widow's^, life Insurance money 1 
odn the ( ineral Is ovar 



The case of the Commonwealth vs. 
Elbert Cook who was charged with 
recklessly driving an automobile 
1 through Florence last November and 
running over Mrs. Bessie Kelly, was 
tried before Judgf Riddell Thursday 
The case was tried before a jury 
composed of J. M. Botts, W. L. Crop- 
per, R. S. Cowen, J. M. Eddins, j. 
Wl Cross and Omer Porter. The de 
fendant was represented by Attor- 
neys D. E. Castleman and E. R. Ri- 
vard and the Commonwealth by 
County Atty. B. H. Riley and Jno. 
L. Vest. Young Cook who was four 
teen last April, was driving the .ma- 
chine east through Florence :!rl 
ran into Mrs. Kelly who was cross- 
ing the street just in front of Scott':.; 
confectionery injuring her severely. 
After hearing the evidence and the 
arguments the jqry found the de- 
fendant guilty and fixed his pu ;- 
ishment at a fine of 125.00. An r.-.id- 



Ville pike to Cam White, of Pet- 
ersbui;^:, therefore the ewes must b<»- 
sold. 

E=ra Aylor, wife and daughter, of 
' E:;^ Bend, »vere guests of Mr. and 
-Mrs. Ed. like, last Thursday. While 
in town Ezra called in fee see th^, 
printers. He said his son. §aw*rd, 
who went to.^ Florida, several months 
ago, had returned home, well satis- 
tied that the la-rul of "sunshine and 
flowers" was not the country for av 
working man. 

Only "true Christians" will be per- 
mitted to enjoy the hospitality of the 
new $5000,000 church-hotel to be 
erected in New York. We see where 
that enterprise is doomed to failure- 
be fore it tarts business. — Ex. 



tlondl Jine for driving a-i auto. '.".- 
bile while he was under 18 years • 
••ire of $10.00 was entered agains; 
h'm. 

DELINQUENT 

The county is adertisinir fl '•■ 
list of delinquent taxpayers. Most of 
them are delinquent tor very small 
amounts thru forgetfulness. The- 
United States government is one 
of the delinquents. 

At times, in the past, it has been 
the custom to farm out the collec- 
tion of delinquent taxes to private 
individuals who receive about 25 per- 
cent of all sums collected. 

This collection ought to be dono 
by the county authorities who are 
paid to 'do it. What a private indi 
vidual can do, they certainly can do. 
Every dollar of these taxes that can 
be -collected should go into the pub 
Tic treasury whichr n,e.eds the nonev 
badly. —Ex. . ' 



J. K.» Tanner,, one of the good 
young farmers of Point Pleasant 
neighborhood, vras transacting hu»i- 



ness in Burlington, last Thursday. 
He made the Recorder a pleasant 
. call. # 

The February term of the Grant 

county circuit court convened M^i- 

day with Judge Sidney Gaines on^^ 

j bench. The term is for three weeks, 

• and there is a large civil docket. 



THE FARMERyAND THE RAIL- 
ROADS 

The greatest industry in the I'n 
>d States today is fanning, with ; 
value of the farms of abotit 'C liil 
lion dollurs. 

The next greatest itnli.str, 
road transportation, with a valu 
the railroad propeities (l f about 
billion dollai 

The fanm-r t dependant upea ik* 
ruilroads to got his products to inai 
k«fe, The railroads uu- depondei 
a large- extent, upon thfl tai 
business. Their interests « 
lutvly mutual. 



J. N. Bennett, bank examiner, was 
in Burlington, on Wednesday oi last 
week, and examined the,#lo local 

j banks, and found them in >rood con- 

' dition. 

Correspondents, in sending in the'.r 
; items must not fail to sign their 
I rtemea. as $he fereordef will not pub- 
lish unsigned articl es wr n e ws it em*. 

Tobacco has been co-.v.ing into the 
1 tobacco warehouse af Walton the 
past few days fatter fh-ln it can be 
handled. -.. .« 

-^aSrt^SSafc— 

The County Clerk bu.i been. quite 
busy the past week making a recap- 
itulation of the Tax t'nmmissioners 
hooka. 

It will N-0.1 be foving day for the- 
tenant*) I he ftrot of March is always 
a li tey time * nh them. 

Tbirt) nine daps of the \i-w Yciw 
ed into limtorv 




m muddy. 




PAGE 



BOONE C OITti i 



RECORDER 



AW, WHAT'S THE USE 




ByL.F.VanZeJm 

© Waitm Newspaper Union 



You Done Your Durndest, FeKx 



have you Taken toue 

PELLETS LIKE T^E DOCTOR 



no , not vet- 
for heavens 
sake , "don't 
keep after 
me all the 
Time/- you 
keep plague- 

\m ME TO 

Take those 
pills every 

MINUTE./ 



CAN You BEAT IT /-here She 

60ES AND SPENDS A SMALL FORTUNE 
TO FIND OUT <5he'<S GOT A HEADACHE 

— Then another small fortune for 

PILLS To CURE IT — AND THEN SETS 
$0T2E AT ME FOR SU6QEST1N' SHE 
USE "faE j**e% 

PlLLS 



White (Irish) Potato Crop 

1923 With Comparisons 

According to revised estimate o' 
December 17, 1923, the potato crop 
of this year was 412,000,000 bush- 
els. In proportion to population the 
crop was about 10 per cent smaller 
than in 1922, 10 er cent larger than 



\ HEBRON. 

"Tlrs. Mary Baker, of Lower River 
Road, is visiting relatives here this 
week. 

Thos. Eggleston and family moved 
from James Bullock's farm to Webb 
McGlasson'a last week. 

Ralph Jones and wife had ai 



in 1921, and about the same as the I guests last Sunday Melvin Jones 
average of the last twelve years. In ; wife and two children. 
New York and in New England th-ij Walter Hafer, wife and two 
crop was larger than last year and daughters spent Sunday with his par- 
also larger than usual. In Minnesota, I ents Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Hafer. 
the Dakotas, Colorado and Idaho the 1 Mrs. Leonard Crigler (nee Jan-j 
crop was smaller than last year but Helm) who was paralyzed about jfcwo 
larger than usual, notwithstanding 1 weeks ago, ided Sunday morning.\ 
sharp reduction in the acreage plant- We want to thank our friends an 



ed. In New Jersey, Delaware, Mar'' 
land, Wisconsin and the Pacific Coast 
states the crop was less than that of 
last year and less than the amount 
usually grown. 

Of the potatoes produced this yer- 
in the 19 surplus labe potato tates 
about 64 per cent would grade as U. 
B. No. 1 or the equivalent tate grade, 
according to reports received fro:n 
growers and shippers. Last year the 



neighbors for their kindness du 
the illness and death of our husba 
and father Chas. Garnett. We alsc 
wish to thank Bro. Runyan, John 
Allison and the Hebron choir. 

There was a large attendance at" 
Sunday school last Sunday. Immed- 
iately after Sunday school there was 
•a brotherhood meeting. Rev. Kaou 
and three of the brethren from the 
First Lutheran church of Cincinna 



average for the same states was 60 1 ti, were present and gave very in- 
per cent. The quality of this pear's teresting talks on the brotherhood, 
crop is particularly good in New Chas. Shelton Ganett, aged 76 
England and New York and is some yeas, a well known citizen of Hebron 
of the Rocky Mountain Palifir Coast . and Limaburg neighborhood, died at 
States. . the home of his son Cullom Tuesday 

In the 16 late potato states which ', Jan. 29th, 1924. He had been in bad 
do not ordinarily raise enough for . health for some time and has been 
their owr. needs, the percentage f confined to his room for several 



their own needs, the percentage of 
this year's crop that wocld grade a 
No. 1 is reported as 55, compared 



months. He was married to Miss 
Sarah Baker n.»re than fifty yea.s 
ago, and to them were born one i 



LIMABURG 

C. E. Beemon butchered hogs one 
day last week. 

Miss Wilda Beemon called on Miss 
Elizabeth Tanner, last Friday. 

Mrs. Homer Jones had as guest 
last Friday Mrs. C. E. Beemon. 

Mr. and Mrs. A. G Beemon spent 
last Thursday in the city shopping. 

Hubert Rcemon spent one night 
last week with his brother, W. t'\ 
BeenKii. 

Mrs. I. J. Tanner was the guesi 
of her mother, Mrs. Milton Beemon. 
last Tuesday. 

Miss Elizabeth Tanner, w\.> 
sprained her ankle while skating, '* 

tting along nicely. 

Mrs. Clara Sorrell and Carl An- 
crson and wife, spent one day last 
w eek with their mother. 

rs. Mae Russ and Miss Isabella 
Rouse and sister Ina, spent last 
Thursday with Mrs. Ed. Farrell. 

J. P. Brothers and wife and littlo 
daughter, and Mr. Geo. Griffith an 1 
wife, called on Mr. and Mrs. Admin 
Sorrell one night Jast week. 

Dr. Cole, wife and son Winfie!d, 
and Mrs. Robert Tanner, and Mjs. 
Will Bradford spent Friday evening 
with Mr. Milton Beemon and wife. 






» » ' i *~»^ w # »••»-« ww was*, aas • ■ * 1 * ■ ■ 1 • 1 I 1 \ 1 I L I 

with 56 last year, and the percentage ! daughter,. Mrs. Chas. Goodridge, of 
of seconds as 31 compared with 2S ' Latonia, and eight sons, Wm. who 



last year. 



ELECTRIC VALUES 

Are you getting your money's 
worth of electricity for the bills , 

which you pay each month? Many of „ p , la , ce : He was a mem °e 
us are acquainted with bulb values, Hopefl [1 church - The funeral 



preceded him to the grave about 
four years ago, Tanner, of Latonis, 
Arthur, of Cincinnati, Richard of 
Ludlow, Howard and Fred of Con- 
stance, Jerry, Walter and Cullom of 
this place. He was a member of the 

services 
were conducted by Rev. Runyan at 



and a considerable saving can be ef- I Z e ™ cond " c ted by Rev. Runyan at 
fected if the lighting is studied care- < H ebron church Thursday at 2 p. m., 
fully, in the presence of a large crowd of 



fully. 

Ordinarily the electrician will in- 
stall 50-watt lamps throughout youi 
home. For rooms where a bright. 
light is essential — such as kitchen, 
bathroom and cellar — the 50-waf 
bulb is an economy. But if you are 
using your bulbs beneath a parch- 
ment shade, or if you prefer mellow 
effects in your hallways and livirg 



Geo. Heil made a business trip to 
the city last Friday. 

Mrs. Chester Tanner has bee-i 
very ill the past few days. 

H. L. Tanner spent Thursday with 
his son Chester Tanner. 

'Miss Belle Baker called on Miss 
Kittie Brown, last Sunday after- 
noon. 

Mrs. May Tanner and son Wilford 
spent Sunday with her mother Mrs. 
Sarah Brown. 

Mrs. May Tanner and son WilfoTd 
spent Monday afternoon with Mrs. 
Wm. Utz and family. 

James Pettit has sold his place 
and will move to L. C. Beemon's 
place on the Burlington pike. 



relatives and friends. The remains 
were laid to rest in the cemetery 
here. He will «« greatly missed by 
his invalid wife and children. 



EAST BEND | 

Roads seem to be in bad condition 
cm account of so much hauling. 
Marion Scott has purchased a ! 
room, a 15 ot_20-watt lamp will be trae t of land from Er L. Stephens. 



sufficient It will burn less elec^T T large' crowd'^ttended'services 
trarty and will be just as attractive. &, the M. E. church Sunday evening 



jBennard and Melvina Hodges 
spent Saturday night and Sunday at ! 



There are many number of new 
bulbs on the market just now. Those , . 
small, frosted ones are ercellent for 1 Big Bone 
side lights where the bulb shows. | R ev . McNeely spoke on Ameri- 
And it is well to consider the more I canism at the Baptist church Janu- 
expensive variety for this use. Where ary 30th. 



a lamp shade covers the bulb, the 
ones of plain glass should be used. 

Do you know that you are wasting 
electricity when your bulbs grow 
dim and you continue to use them, 
Toe electrid power is being con- 
sumed without giving the desired 
light. 



MARRIED 

Alvin Franks and Miss Goldfe* 
Harwell were married at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Craddock four 
wiles south of Burlington, last Sun- 
day afternoon by Rev. W. W. Adams, 
pastor of the Burlington Baptist 
church. Their friends wish thei 
long, happy and prosperous life. 



NOTICE 

All persons indebted to the estate 
-•f -Cynthia Mason will come forward 
and settle same. All persons having 
claims against said estate will pre- 
sent same proven as the law re- 
quires. 

CYNTHIA WHITE, 

Executrix 



The Fiscal Court was in session 
Tuesday. They decided that the roads 
would be maintained under the super- 
vision of the Magistrates. 

The electric franchise was award- 
ed to the Dixie Light Co., Walton. 

W. A. Price, of Erlanger, and At- 
torney S. D. Rouse and E. S. Lee, 
President of the First National Bank 
I Corington, were transacting busi- 
ness in Burlington, Monday. 

Furnish Penn, wife and son, of 
Oovington, spent Saturday night and 
Sands y with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Geo. Penn. 



Hubert and Herman Ryle have ; 
been hauling tobacco to Walton the ' 
past week. . 

Helen Rice entertained a few of 
the young folks with a Rook party 
Saturday night. 

James Hodges and Bill Ogden de- 
livered some of their tobacco to Bel- : 
levicw last week. 

Irene and Wilma Scott visited I 
Mildred and Rose Hodges Saturday ! 
flight and Sunday. | 

Ada Ryle and daughter visited 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Acra Sat- 
urday night and Sunday. | 

Harry Carlyle, Virginia Montgom- 



Too Late for Last Week 

Mr. James Pettit has been on the 
sick list. 

Mrs. Ed. Farrell has been very ill 
the past week. 

Geo. Heil made a business trip to 
B irlington last Motday afternoon. 

James F. Brown is spending a few 
days with his grandmother, at Flor- 
ence. 

Miss A'ma Tanner spent Tuesday 
with her grandmother, Mrs. Sarah 
Brown. 

Mrs. May Tanner called on Wm. 
Utz and family last Sunday after- 
noon. 

James Brown, and wife spent Sat- 
urday and Sunday with her mother 
at Florence. 

Mr. and Mrs. Will Gross enter- 
tained some of their friends with a 
card party, Saturday night 



Coughs 

that embarrass you 

can be quickly cheeked by Dr. 
King's New Discovery. Gently, 
hurmlcssly it stimulates the mu- 
cous membranes to throw off 
Hogging secretions. The cough- 
ing paroxysms are controlled and 
the irritation that is causing the 
cough promptly clears away. 

DR. K.ING S NEW DISCOVERY 



HEBRON THEATRE- Next Saturday 

ALL STAR 

Lights of New York" 

MUTT AND /EFF CARTOONS, 

"RED HOT" 

Admission 22 Cents, :-: Children 10 Cents 



OE2K 



yOkOOBCA 



War Tax Included 
Stl 



ka^aJ 



FOR SALE ETC 




Polish your car with Re-Nu- bod - ; 
gloss. Inexpensive and EASY TO 
A ppr.v Cleans, polishes and pre- 
serves. Also excellent for furniture. 
Hope Conner, Florence, Ky. 



FOR RENT 

Ground for corn and tobacco, with 
or without tenant house. Renter t-> 
have own team and tools. 

SNYDER BROS., 
Phone Bur. 184. Bullittsville, Ky. 
30jan — 4t 



FOR SALE 

Two good heating stoves. 

1 Kitchen Range. 

2 Wardrobes. 
2 Bureaus. 

2 Bedsteads. 
Barro' °pray pump. 
Apples. 

B. T. KELLY, 

Burlington R. D. 2. 

ofeb7— 2t 



FOR SALE OR TRADE 

Confectionery and soda fountain, 
doing good business, corner stand, S 
rooms, low rent, or will trade for 
farm, give or take difference. 

48 Elm Street, 
Ludlow, Ky. 
(Phone S. 269 1-X.) 

81jan— tf 



Marvin Adams ofBardstown, Ky., 
has been elected permanent all-time 
Alumni Secretary of Georgetown 
College and will take charge of his 
work May 1. 

Some time ago the trustees of the 
College met with prominent alun-nt 
and decided that for the expansion 
of the institution a full time alumni 
secretary was necessary and author- 
ized a committee of the Alumni to 
appo int some one to take charge of 



a flying trip to Walton Sunday af- 
ternoon. 



Mrs. E. W. Duncan, of Walton, h 
sick at Deaconess Hospital, 
nati. 



2£l 



afreaklin criticised the English for 
freer drinking 



TUBERCULOSIS WORK 
GOES FORWARD. 

That the eradication of tubercu- 
losis among cattle herds is going on 
at greater rate than ever before is 
shown by the figure? compiled fo- 
the past fiscal year by the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 
Five States tested rnorr- than 200,- 
000 head each, Wisconsin leading 
with approximately 281,000, follow- 
ed by Michigan with 274,000, New 
York with 253,000, Missouri with 
219,000, and Iowa with 214,000. 

Leaders in the eradication work 
believe that it win he necessary to 
test all cattle in the country before 
any assurance is possible that the 
disease can be controlled and even- 
tually eradicated. Investigations in- 
dicate that one out of every nine 
farm premises in the United States 
harbors one or more tuberculosis an- 
imals. The lowest record for any 
State was 1 per cent or one farm in 
a hundred, while the highest State 
percentage was 47. j 

Wm. L. Siphon* will have a sale 
of personal property at hi* residence 
on Middle creek, Saturday, Feb. 9th, 
beginning at 12 o'clock. See ad. Ir! 
this leaue. 



the work of orgasizing the alumni 
of the schhool on a scientific basis. 

The committee held several meet- 
ings and finally ocered the positicr 
to Marvin Adams, a graduate of the 
College in the class of 1922. Tr>e 
offer was made and Mr. Adams ac- 
cepted, to begin his active work on 
May 1. 

Soon after his acceptance Mr. Ad- 
ams stated that he was enthusiastic 
over the prospects of his work and 
looked forward with interest to the 
time when he could enter upon his 
duties. He stated that his first work 
would be to revise the records now 
in possession of the school relative 
to the graduates and former students 
and that as soon as possible he would 
take the field for active work or or 
ganization. Georgetown Clubs will 
be organized in every portion ot th* 
state and adjoining states, and fol- 
lowing such organization the Clubs 
will be kept informed about the pro- 
gress of the work of the school and 
will be used in furthering the plans 
of the College. Mr. Adams will be an 
acceptable appointment to the many 
alumni of the school who know him 
and admire the work he has already 
accomplished. 



For Sale->-Ten High Egg bred S. 
Comb White Leghorn Cockerels. Al- 
si. 000 Buckeye Incubator. Terms 
to suit. Write or phone for price-.. 
Mrs. B. E. Aylor, Burlington, Ky. 
It— pd 

WANTED — Man with small fam- 
ily to work by day and raise tobacc. 
and corn on shares. I furnish team 
and tools and cows. Black, new land, 
good house. Require reference if 
stranger. Good place. W. M. Balsly, 
Burlington, Ky. Phone 182-X. 

For Sale — Driving mare, buggv 
and harness, buggy and harness good 
as new. Mare good driver and will 
work any place you put her. R. Con- 
nelly, Union, Ky. 



ol4feb— 4t pd 



For Sale — Four year old mule. E 
J. Aylor, Hebron, Ky. 

It — pd 

Don't cut your farm up with wa; - - 
on tracks. Get a C & K sled. Made 
by CONNER & KRAUS, Florenc?, 
Ky. Sold by Walton Lumber Co., 
Walton, Ky., and Aubrey Finn, Bur- 
lington, Ky., R. D, 1. 



For Sale — Nice lot of ear co-n 
and Timothy hay. J. L. Jones, Land- 
ing, Ky. 

o28feb — 4t 



WANTED — To rent farm of about 
75 or 150 acres — will pay money 
rent. Must be some tobacco and 
corn ground and on milk route. II. 
K. & C. H. Wiliams, Burlington, Ky., 
R. D. 1. Phone 203. 



Public Sale, 

I will offer tor sale at my residence, one-mile below Belle- 
view. Ky., on the Rabbit Hash road, on 

Tuesday, Feb. 19th, 

' The Following Property : 

Two Jersey Milch Cows, aged Mare, Oliver Chilled Plow 
No. 40, Dixie Plow, Iron Double Shovel, Work Harness, 
Bridles, Collars, Buggy and Harness, Economy Cream 
Separator, 2 5-gallon Cream Cans, Scalding Box, 3 Lard 
Kettles. Crackling Press and Sausage Mill, Check Lines, 
pair Beam Scales, Cornsheller, Iron Bedstead and Mattress, 
Man's Saddle, Ladies' Saddle, 100 Brick, 2-horse Harrow, 
Logchain, Meat Berch, Ladder, 2 Meat Tubs, Brand Tub, 
about 2 tons of Timothy and Clover Hay. 



TERMS OF SALE 

All sums oi $5.00 and under, cash ; on all sums over that 
amount a credit of six months, purchaser to give note with 
good security payable at Citizen Deposit Bank, C rant, Ky. 

B. F. CRISLER. 

Sale to begin at 1 o'clock sharp. 

DON WILLIAMSON, Auctioneer. 



Why Mr. N. Windsor (R. I.) Put Up 
with Rats for Years 

"Year* ago I (ot tome rat poison, which nearly 
killed our fine watch dog. We put up with rata 
until a friend told me about Rat-Snap. It surely 
kilb rats, though houaepeta won't touch It." Rats 
dry up and leave do smell. Prices. 35c. 6Sc. $1.25. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

Oulley A Pettit, D. R. Blythe. 

WANTED 

Man to raise three or four acr. 
of tobacco and work by the day. 
House, garden and cow pasture fur 
nfshed. 

C. L. Cropper, Idlewild, Ky. 
. 24jan— tf 



Mrs. Cr»ndall (low.) TelU How Sh* 
S to pped Chicken Lowes 

-" Laat spring, rats Wind all our baby chicks. Wish 
I'd known about Rat-Snap before. With just one 

large package we killetl swarms al rata. They won't 
get this year's hsrtcbes. IT1 bet." sUt-Soanfaj guar. 
anteed and sella for J5c 65c. 11.25. m 

Sold sad guaranteed by 

Gnlley A Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 
1). R. Blythe Burlington, Ky. 



WANTED— Man to raise three > 
four acres of tobacco. C. L. Croppy 
Idlewild, Ky. 17Jan— tl 




NOTICE— See M. B. Rice, Rabbit 
Hash, Ky., for prices on Ford cars 
and Ford Tractors. 

Hairs Catarrh 
Medicine "L do f :, h ";, w j 

rid your system of Catarrh or Deafness 
caused by Catarrh. 

Sold by druggist! for ortr 40 jten 

F. J. CHENEY &. CO., Toledo, Ohio 



nuuixi nib 



WANTED — Married man to work by 
month or raise crop. Also some on j 
to build 200 rods wire fence. Jas. 
E. Gaines, Burlington R. D. 1. 
oUfeb— 2tpd 



Farm for rent on shares, corn to- 
bacco and oats ground — 20 acres of 
meadow. R. T. McCandless, Covinp- 
ton, Ky. Phone Cov. 2848-x 
o28feb — 4t 



• SALESMAN WANTED ' to solicit 
orders for lubricating oil, greaseH 
and paints. Salary or Commission. 
Address THE HARVEY OIL CO., 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

It — pd 



NOTICE. 

We ire now starting another class 
of borrowers for loans from the Fed- 
eral Land Bank. Any borrower de- 
siring a loan will please call and fill 
out formal application as we expect 
to close this class within 30 days. 

The Boone County National Farm 
Loan Association. 

A. B. RENAKER, Sacty-Treas, 

Burlington, Ky. 



OF ALL KINDS DONL BY 

WaEfer R. Huey 



' "RENCE, KY. 

Prices Rett h '■'"■ Give Me a Trial 

P. 416.X 



NOTICE 



Persons having claims against the 
estate of Washington Utz, deceased 
must present theiu to me, those In- 
debted to said estate pleass come 
forward and settle same. 

J.C. UTZ, Erlanger, Ky. 



For Sale— -Good cow and 
Smith Goodridge, Hebron, Ky. 

It 



calf. 



HOTld 
All persona imk-. . ! to Thomas 
Corcoran, defeased, wul pjtease corac 
forward and pay same. All persons 
having claims against said estate Will 
present same proven as the law re- 
quires. 

MICHAEL CORCORAN, 
Executor 

WANTED— To rent farm— will 
rent on the share or money rent 
prefer money rent, would hke fam. 
located near school and on good 
road, one that will do for dairy farm 
and some good tobacco and com 
land. 7 or 8 acres of tobacco and 20 
acres for corn. 

CHESTER HILL, 

Idlewild, Ky. 
o80jan4t — pd 



For Rent-Corn and tobacco land urn 
shares. House garlen, cow pasture 
barns 4c. 

Dr. B. H. t ruder, 
o Mfetl. Burlington, Ky. 



^ 



PACE 

All nhit— l4ut, card of thank* and 
all other — H er, not mm, mu.t to 
»*U for at 5 cmU per Una. 



Baamsbnrg Baptist Church. 

J. W. CAMPBELL, Paator. 

Snnday School every Sunday at 
10.00 a-m. 
Regular preaching aarrleas on tha 
and Third otmdays in each 

' at 11:00 a. nu 



RED GROSS NEWS. 

Incomvlete returns from the sev- 
enth annual Roll Call show an enroll- 
ment of 2,600,867. 



KMtaodist Episcopal Chare*. 

■EV. P. G. GILLESPIE Pa.tor 

Florence and Burlington Charge 

FLORENCE 

First and Third Sundays 11 a. m. 
ihn-ufy School »:!• a. ra. 

(hRflB Hattie Mae Bradford, Supt) 
Upworth League every Sunday at 
6 §x at. 

(Hub Mamie Robinson, President) 
Prayer meeting 1 Wednesday 7:30. 
BURLINGTON 

Second and Fourth Sundays at 11 
a. m., and 7 p. m. 

Snnday School every Sunday at ! 

a. m. 

(Mrs. Edna Eddins, Supt) 
Prayer meeting Thursday at 7 p. 



Announcement has not yet been 
made as to the person succeeding 
Mrs. White as Field Representative. 



The Red Cross Nutrition course 
has been adopted by the Massachu- 
setts Girl Scouts. 



A collection of 800 drawings made 
by Japanese school children has been 
sent th«» American Junior Red Cross 
by the Japan Society of America. 



Campbell county 
started organizing i 
Cross. 



has recently 
Junior Red 



Petersburg Baptist Church. 

REV. O. J. CHASTA1N, Pa.tor. 

Mid-week prayer meeting Wed- 
nesday 7:80 p. m. 

Snnday School every Sunday 10 
a. m. 

^ Preaching on Second and Fourth 
Sssniay 11 a. m., and 7:30 p. m. 

B. Y. P. U. 6:30 p. m., Sunday. 



The breadth of the Xmas greet- 
ings sent out by the Chapters ha3 
just been measured. It starts at Noar- 
vik, north of the Artie Circle in 
Alaska and ends at the Panama Ca- 
nal. That Santa Claus can pop out 
of a cretonne bag to amuse and com- 
fort a lonely soldier is proved. 



Modern Woodmen. 



Boone Co. Lutheran Pastorate 

. REV. GEO. A. ROYER. Pa.tor. 
Sunday Feb. 10th. 

Hopeful 9:30 a. m., Sunday School. 

Hopeful 10:30 a. m., Regular Ser- 
vice. 

Hopeful 7 p. m.. Luther League. 

Hebrdn 1:30 p. m., Sunday school. 

Ebenezer 2:30 p. m.. Regular ser- 
vice. 
AU are cordially invited to these 

services. 



J. H. Latham, District Deputy 
Modern Woodmen of America, Cov- 
ington Ky., and Miss Nell DeHart of 
Louisville, were in Boone county 
Wednesday and Thursday of last 
week, in the interest of the Modern 
Woodmen, and the Royal Neighbu..,, 
the auxiliary of the Modem Wood- 
man. 



BUSINESS ON THE SARM 

The Illinois Grange recommends 
that farmers advertise their products 
as one method of solving "farm 
problems." 

The telephone and the classif r u 
advertising pages of newspapers usod 
with discretion and same faith and 
understanding which business men 
display in advertising their products, 
could be of inestimable value to far- 
mers who had courage to use them. 

Why should a farmer not utilize 
modern selling methods in disposing 
of his products direct to consumers" 
The automobile makes delivery or 
farm gates profitable and rapid. Bus- 
iness metho' 4 " "'•'" -»- rr.cre than po- 
litical methods to solve the farmers' 
problems and the Illinois Grange is 
to be commended for its progres- 
sive action. 




The following counties have bean 
added to the Twelfth District: Rob- 
ertson, Pendleton, Grant and Brack- 
en. 



Patriarch Camp No. 12004 initiat- 
ed Samuel Ryle into the mysteries of 
Woodcraft last week. 

Patriarch Camp is preparing to 







Burlington Baptist Church 

REV. W. W ADAMS, Pa.tor 

Prayer meeting Saturday 7 p. iu. 
PaMor will lead. Subject "The Mes- 
«are of Ejhesiam." 

Bible School 10 a. m. 

Preaching 11 a. m. Sermon "Sav- 
ed by Grace." 

Young People's work 6 p. m. 

Preaching 7 p. m. 



Edgar Henaley is able to be up 
aal around after two week's illness. 

F. H. Boose after b^ing confined 
to the house for four weeks, is able 
t» he out again. 

M. Hawes, of Covington, spent 
■atarday night and Snnday with his 
■other, Mrs. Martha Hawes. 

Mrs. AUie Parsons, of Milan, In- 
diana, has been the guest of Mrs. A. 
B. Sandford, several days. 

Mrs. Agness Clore, Edward Rice 
aad Jack Eddins, who have been quite 
sick for some time, are all improv- 
er- 

The many friends of Mrs. Mary 
Goodridgc will be glad to hear that 
she is convalescing after a two 
week's severe illness. 

We had a little of all kinds of 
weather Monday — sunshine, rain, 
hail, thunder and lightning. Some 
claim that the backbone of winter is 
rroken. 



have a big celebration and "feed" 
on their anniversary about the mid- 
dle of March, The C»mp will be* one 
year old at that time. Full particu- 
lars will appear later. 



John J. Howe Commonwealth's 
Attorney from the Fifteenth Judic- 
ial District announces his candidacy 
for United States Senator frrm 
Kentucky subject to the action of the 
Democratic party in the Primary elec 
tion to t>e held August 2, 1924. 

As announced in a special dispatch 
from Carrollton, Ky., and in addi- 
tion to a formal statement publish- 
ed in the Carrollton Democrat of 
February 2, Mr. Hawe takes the peo- 
ple and press of the State into his 
confidence and frankly discusses 
what he deems as paramount for 
the success of the Democratic party. 

Clifford Sutton, formerly of Belle- 
view, but now a resident of Cincin- 
nati, was in Burlington for a short 
time last Saturday morning, enroute 
to see his aged mother, Mrs. Jane 
Sutton, who has been quite ill at her 
home near McVille. While in town 
he paid our office a pleasant call and 
renewed his subscription to the Re- 
corder. He still enjoys the news from 
the land of his employ of wof wok w 
the land of his boyhood days. Cliff 
is in the employ of the American 
Express Co., with a run between Cin- 
cinnati and Chicago, a position he 
has held for many years. It is need- 
less to say that he is making a suc- 
cess. 



Mrs. B. E. Aylor attended a med- 
iating of the State Poultry Assoc- 
iation at Lexington, last week. Sha- 
wns a delegate from the Boone Co. 
PhnUry Association. 



S ervices w i ll be held at the P res- 



byterian church Union, Ky., next 
Sunday morning at 11 and evening 
a* 7. Pleaching by Rev. Smith, of 
louisviile, Ky You are requested 
te he present. 



J. A. Riddell, cf Hebron neigh- 
borhood, was in attendance at court 
Monday. He has almost reached the 
four-score mark and gets around 
like a boy of sixteen. Mr. Riddell 
has just returned from a visit of 
two weeks with his sister in Illinois. 



One of our old bachelor friends 
culled in one evening last week, and 
upon beins asked if he knew anv 
news, he said "r.ope," only I thought 
I was going to be held up as I came 
up the street a while ago. Knowing 
there were he ba-i." ■■■? in Burlington 
wc asked bill to ro'afe his exper- 
ience w!vn he gave us the follow- 
ing: "As I was coming up the street 
in high I noticed twn lariipg — a n p]^ 



maid and a widow, standing on the 
corner, I went into low, thinking that 
I might catch an ear full as I pass 
ed, I heard the following — I wo. 
propose, if I just dared, but when 
gel a chance, why I'm two darned 
badly scared. Knowing this was Lean 
Year I threw into high and motored 



James A. Duncan, age 71 years 
one of the county's well known and 
highly respected citizens, died at the 
home of B. F. Jarrell, near Bullitcs- 
yille, with whom he had been ma<- 
ing his home for several years, Mon 
day afternoon, Feb. 4th, 1924, after 
an illness of t_;-\:;_I years. 

J. A. Duncan was born in Boone 
county, March 6th, 1853, and was a 
son of J. W. Duflean, who for many 
years was Circuit Court Clerk j'i 
this county. He was united in mar- 
riage to Miss Minnie Gaines, who 
preceded him to the grave many 
years apo. To this union one daugh- 
ter was born — Mrs. V. W. Gaines, of 
Covington. He is also survived by 
one sister, Mrs. R. A. Brady, of th s 
place, and two half brothers, Dr. E. 
W. Duncan, of Walton, and John P, 
Duncan of Cincinnati. 

"Jim" as he was familiarly called 
was a splendid man and citizen, and 
to know him was to like him. He 
followed farming most of his life, 
until 1901 he was elected to the of- 
fice of Circuit Clerk, which positio i 
he filled for a few years, and on ac- 
count of failing health resigned and 
returned to the farm.' 

James A. Duncan was a gentleman 
of the truest type, honest, upright 
and respected for his high moral 
character. When - the announcement 
was made Monday evening that ha 
had passed to that other and better 
world, it was received with universal 
sorrow by his many friends in Bur- 
lington and throughout the county. 
We say that a good citizen has gone 
to his reward, and as we chronicle 
this sad event and in our feeble way- 
try to pay tribute to this good man, 
we find that we are lacking in words 
that will in any degree express our 
high regard for this splendid charac 
ter which we knew all our life. 

The remains were taken to Bui 
littsburg cemetery Wednesday at 11 
o'clock, and after a short service at 
the grave, conducted by Rev. Camp- 
bell, were laid to rest by the side of 
his wife. 



THE UNIVERSAL CAR 

Forecasting A Tremendous 
Spring i/tiiictuu 

739,626 

more Ford cars and trucks were pro- 
duced last year than the previous 
year, an increase of over 50 per cent. 

In spite of thi9 tremendous increase in production, it was 
impossible to meet delivery requirements during the spring 
and summer months when orders for 350,000 Ford Cars 
and Trucks could not be filled. 

This year winter buying for immediate delivery has been 
more active than ever before — and in addition 200,000 
orders have already been booked through the Ford Weekly 
Purchase Plan for spring delivery. 

These facts clearly indicate that the demand during thi3 
spring and summer will be far greater than ever, and that 
orders should be placed immediately with Ford Dealers as 
a means of protection against delay in securing your Ford 
Car or Truck or Fordson Tractor. 




aM4 



A anull depoait down, with ear? payment* of 
the balance arranged, or rour enrollment under 
the Ford Weekly Purchase Plan, will put four 
order ob the preferred list lor spring delivery. 



See the Nearest Authorized 
rord Dealer 




FARM BUREAU NOTES. ! __ JE^OURTESY__g_[ 



SERVICE 
FIRST 



There will be a demonstration of 
the best methods of pruning grapes 
to be held at the home of Deputy 
Sheriff L. T. Utz, at Burlington, on 
Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock. Tho 
demonstration will be put on by tne ' 
County Agent. He will not only show 
how to trim the vines but will tell 
how to control disease thru pruning. 



JD-QSTABIUTYQ-gH 



W. W. Magill, Extension Pomolo- 
gist from the Experiment Station, 
Lexington, will spend the 5th and 
6th of March with our County Agent. ! 
At that time meetings will be held ! 
at Burlington, Hebron, Rabbit Hash ' 
and Verona, where demonstrations 
of pruning, spraying and fertiliza- 
tion of fruit trees will be put on. All 
those who are interested in better 
orchard practices and better fruit, 
should arrange to attend one of i 
these meetings. The place of th* | 
meetings will be announced later. 



A Solid Foundation 

This bank is built on a solid foundation of a large 
Capital and a Large Surplus which speaks SAFETY 
for your deposits. 

We want to do busfems*, «;_U you and ,«u will 
find that we "Do things for our Customers." 



FRANCESVILLE. 

Fred Reitmann s>nd family 
rently moved to North Bend. 



re- 



Miss Amanda Koons hurt one of 



on. 



id *tist thjs week. 
A 3 Mr. and Mrs. 

tored% Ue8ts ° f , her P 
linrry Kilgour, 



A public pruning demonstration 
will be held at L. T. Utx's yard in 
■Turlington, Saturday afternoon, Feb. 
tth, at 2 o'clock. County Agt. Mat- 
sen has secured the services of an 
expert to do this work for the bene- 
fit cf those who will make it con- 
venient to attend. 

Fred Heil, of Point Pleasant 
neigborhood, gathered from his flock 
of 11)0 hens during the month of Jan- 
uary, 2082 eggs, which is an aver- 
age of nearly 11 eggs per hen. One 
per consisting of 98 Rhode Island 
Fed* laid 1275 eggs, an avorage of 
13 per hen. This is • record that is 
kard to beat 



H. T. Kelly and family have mov 
ed from the farm to their new hunjr- 
alow In Maple Grove mih division, 
and Mr. Claud Greenup and family 
have morV.I t«> Mr. Kelly's farm, and 
A L Nichols and family who have 
sesa living ha Hurltngton hav« mm 
rd hack to their farm ntatsd 
Mr Grtanun, 



The stock of Oscar Underwood of 
Alabama has risen somewhat since 
the Democrats have decided to hold 
their national convention in New 
York City. New York is "enemy ter 
ritory" to the friends of William Mc- 
Adoo, and the decision of the Na- 
tional Committee has resulted in a 
speeding up of their plans to get 
the nomination for the former Sec- 
retary of the Treasury. Bryan's 
"nomination" of a Florida collegd 
professor for the Presidency caused 
little more than a faint ripple on the 
politcal waters here. 

It has. become Difficult for tne 
President of the Senate to assemble 
enough of the members on the floor 
at one time to get a quorum for tho 
transaction of business. Everyone is 
busily ravaged j n aome kind of nn 
investigation, Nevor before in history 
have so many things been ■objected 
to senatorial scrutiny it the iama 
time. It is rut misted (hut theaa 
official inquiries will oust well 

it million dollars. 



The following niarrtj»ir« litem 
were lanued by tho Count) CI 
week Elijah Norton and 
I, Alvln Frank* ami 
well, 



her hands recently by letting a pole 
fall on it. 

Miss Laura Katherine Evans ani 
Mrs. R. S. Wilson are on the ' sick 
jst thjs week. 

rs. Frank Aylor were 

parents, Mr. and Mrs. 

-., Sunday. 

JMr. and Mrs. Forest Riddle, Miss 

Rhoda Eggleston and Otto Munt:: 

spent Sunday at W. H. Eggleston's. 

Masses Amanda Koons and Sadie 
Riemsn entertained Rev. O. J. Chas- 
tain and Miss Katherine Estes Sun- 
day. 

Mr. Jerry Estes and Mrs. W. 
Eggleston and son Edward attende_ 
tne funeral of Mr. Ertes sister, Mrs. 
Sallie Rudisell at Addyston, one 
day last week. 

Mrs. Chas. Muntz was called to 
Westwood last week by the death of 
her mother, Mrs. Abe Moore. Mr. 
and Mrs. Moore lived in this county 
years ago and had many friend.* 
here. 

Mr. and Mrs. R. W. Baker -end 
little son Ronald Lee, of Oaklt 
spent Saturday night and Sunda.v 
with relatives ben and attended 
church at Sand Run Sunday morn 
ing. 

Carroll Lm Aylor, irandaaa of 

Mr and Mrs. K. J. Aylor. won thud 

i" las m a Battr Babtsa Coatoti rs 
eoatiy eondudtad bj the Ohio Par 

m i Carroll Lee has quits ■ health 
rd, having captured thn . 

ire thin oi 



At the monthlymeeting of the Di- 
rectors of the Boone County Farm 
Bureau held at the Burlington office 
last Monday, plans were laid for a 
big year's work, that will be of value I 
to all members. 

More than fifty members were ' 
present at the meeting, and voted to 
put on a membership drive to make 
the organization stronger and better 
able to cope with its problems. 
Lengthy talks were given by J. B. 
Cloud, Hebron and R. J. Matson, 
County Agent, both telling of what 
the Farm Bureau had done in the 
past and what it could do in the 
future. 

Especial attention will be put, nn ' 



4 Per Cent 

and taxes paid on time deposits. 

Capital. $ 50.000.00 

Surplus $100,OOO.O0j 

Peoples Deposit Bank 

Burlington, Ky. 

C. H. YOUELL, Present. A. W. CORN, Vke-Preaident. 

A. B. RENAKER, Caahier. 
Nell H. Martin, A».t. Caahier. L. C. Beemon, Aaat. Caahier. 



the reduction of farm taxes this 
year. A similar move as the one 
planned by the local Farm Bureau, 
was put on in Union county, Ky., last 
year and resulted in the saving cf 
over -?0,OOO in taxes to the farmers 
of that county. "If the people of 
Boone county will stick together an 
equal or even greater saving coud 
be had," according to J. L. Kite who 
explained the program as put on in 
that county. 

William Arnold was elected as a 
director from the Petersburg and 
Belleview precincts for this year. 




Taylorsport. 



■I* 



,,r < J in tha Boom coanty 

lav , i. hated 

I Ma»..t,, \V \\ i- ..,„. VV 






Preaching service and S. S. every 
day. 

rs. Anna Goodridgc has been 
visiting relatives here the past week. 

A meeting of the Mother's Club 
was held at the school house Friday 
afternoon. 

The Mother's Club expects to pur- 
chase a piano for the school in the 
near future. 

During the last month school at- 
tendance has fallen off considerably 
wing to the whooping cough. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Sprague and 
'-oiis spent Sunday with her sister 
and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. 
Chambers of Price Hill 

NOTICE 

All persona having claims agaimt 

(lie estate of Ku K 'riii* lllyttie. 

■ d, Will | 
in us the |«W requires All pei 
" w "<g »i |t* will settle 

at tii 

A B RKNAKKR. 

ltseeuter 



K. M. C. Co. . 

BIG SALE 

Ford Heaters , , , $i,iq 

Ford Bumpers 3.98 

Ford Radiator Covers 2.85 

Windshield Wipers gg 

30x3 X Weed Chains 2.48 

30x3 ' Tire and Tube 9.98 

All Supplies Marked Down. 

We have some fine bargains in used tires. 

See us before you buy. 

Kentucky Motor Car Co., 

325 Scott St., Covington, Ky. 

PAUL BETHEL, Pre., and Manager. 
Pleaae Bring thi. Ad With You. Phone 310 



Ewes For Sale 

85 good Stock Ewes-a number of them 
have lambs and others due to lamb. 
Will sell in lots to subpurchaser. Hav- 
ing sold my farm these ewes must be 
sold at once. Priced* to sell. 
J. M. RICE, Grant, Ky. - 

"■"""■■■■"^ "■""—•"■at*-* "" ^— — _, _ — ,„ ... M | ,.„_.____ _^ ^ m 

Subscribe For Th# K«««onlor $1.50 n«r re __- 

DO vou 1 \kk riiK RKCOADSl 



.. 



PAGE FOUR 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



The order of the Interstate 
-mfrce Commission, requiring 
roads to issue interchangPflbh 
age ticket* under the Act of 

It. hy tl 
Court. Th i • 1 1 ' ' ; ' isioh v.-.-i 
cd on the -•. ■ ent that he 
must firs! bo h 



rail- 
mil 
15)2:1 



(. .1 



.r.ls 



111.-. ukm»p I n< ■ 
iiisr freight rate* S 
Kansas, produced reco 
that the income of all road 
exceeded $(j,5«0,000,000 
gest earnings in theii 
total profit* would pay a dividende 
of 10 per cent on the agg re gat e cap- 
ital stock of all railroads in the U. 



red 

[>per, 

show 

in r. 

The 1 
history. 1 



THE 
The 

... .: I ;. 



ent "I 
Hevrd 



The completed tax revision hill 
which the committee places before 
the House next month for passage 
will he a compromise between the. 
Republican and I>cmocratic nr<, 
grams. The big fact that stands o-i 
above all else, however, is that taxes 
are going to he reduced — everyone 
agrees to that, though the amount 
and exact form of the reductions 
are still in doubt. 



Nothing short >>( g miracle will 
bring the Mellon tax reduction llan 
; iut of the House Ways and Meai » d 
Committee In the exact form it was 
sent to Congress by the Secretary 
of the Treasury — and this in race ft* 
the repeated warning from tie 
White House that President CooHdgc 
will i'n! tolerate any changes in the 
reduction plan .approved by th? Ad 
ministration. 



WORLD'S COTTON INDUS- 
TRY. 
British Cotton-Growing A - 

hi was founded In I!*<vj for 
purpo of i ostcring cat 
wing within the Empire, pre- 
in interesting report of th- 
is made to becoin'e independ 
American cotton, for it is be-' 
the day is at hand when 
America will not only consume all 
the cotton she grows but import 
targe quantities' from Egypt. The 
report says the Sudan district prom- 
ises to yield 150,000 bales. In the 
Sudan the native cultivator receives 
40 per cent,, the government which 
supplies the land and water gets Si. 
per cent, and the capitalist, the Su- 
dan Plantations Syndicate, which fi- 
nances, manages, supsrvises cultiva 
turn and gins the crop gets 25 per 
cent. Uganda now produces about 
00,000 K «'es of goz .' c ,rade, and thio 
may be increased to one billion. In 
other parts of South Africa the yield 
is steadily increasing. India produc- 
es -1, 500,000 bales. Australia has IOC, 
0<H) acres under cultivation, and the 
British West Indies produced 4,- 
500 bales of the famous Sea Island 
Cotton. 

Brazil, too, has millions of acXCi] 
well adopted for the growth of cot- 
ton, and the gove r nme nt is encour- 
aging it in various ways. The rapid 
expansion of textile manufacturin : 
plants has absorbed nearly all the 
native cotton and it is the purpose 
of the government to more EKn»i 
double the acreage. 



KEMP'S 

Balsam 



Dcm'i 
Caught 
Caur 



In 1023 farmers planted 3-1 1,000,- 
000 acres of the 14 principal crops, 
according to the Crop Reporting 
F'.ard of the I r.'ted State; l>epa:i- 
mei t of Ae,r',<-;ltMe. Thi ■ was an 
in. "vase of ? r\ than J.(00,n r 
EC 's ever 1!) r>. The pv ' icticn of 
th * 1 4 crons j.; estimated to i.jrgro- 
g-tf '. t; 5,000, 000" tons, cm u'-'vA the 
sai;e ft in Wl'l und 1 1,000 W t.: r; c 
la'^'ef than *he lO.year a en.ge. 



Just about the time the United 
States entered the World War, sev- 
eral of the greatest naval authori- 
ties in this country and Europe test- 
if e-l that our coast defenses at Pan- 
ama were so eotnpTetc that no enemy 
including England could approach 
within 20 miles without committing 
suicide. Now we are told as a result 
of a sham battle that we are at the 
mercy of a 10c, and greater guns are 
needed. 



Senator Couzins, of Michigan, 
eharged on ^he- floo r of t h e Senate 
that "more dishonest misstatements, 
if not absolute falsehoods, have been 
handed out at the Treasury Depart- 
ment for the purpose of misleading 
the public, than were ever issued by 
a public department in my recollec- 
tion." That's, a very sweeping 
charge from a responsible source, 
and should not be passed unchal- 
lenged. 

3udg Gary says that abolishing the 
12-hour work day has increased the. 
cost of production 10 p«r cent. He 
did not say whether that 10 per cent 
had been paajfed on to the consumer, 
but as that is the rule it is taken for 
granted. AnothW isde of the ques- 
tion is illustrated- in the fact that in 
Youngstown, OfofL. bank deposits 
show an increase, oj^$ 10,000,000 dur- 
ing the past year, and the anufac- 
turers have but little trpuble in ob- 
taining all the labor joecessary. 

Over 100 quarts, of canned vegeta- 
bles are in the pantry of a Washing- 
ton County, R. I., farm 'family as a 
result of the boys and girls joining 
the gardening and canning clubs 
which the couty extension agent or- 
ganized in their community last 
year. The two boys, according to re- 
ports, to the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, raised enough 
vegetables to supply the famjly the 



W. J, Fields appointed Mrs. Pearl 
Hindman Harris, Cattlettsburg, K.«\, 
to succeed M. E. Lignon, Seventh 
Appellate district; Prof. R. A. Ed- 
wards member of the facuty of Eas- 
tern Xormal School, to succeed H. 
L. Tonovan; Prof. M. C. Ford, mem- 
ber of the faculty of Western Nor- 
mal School, to succeed A. L. Crabbe, 
as members of the State Text Book 
Commission. 

The commission meets Thursday, 
February, 7th, Prof. McHenry 
Rhoads, Supt., of Public Instruction 
and Secretary of the commission, an- 
nounced at the same time. 

The Senate passed three bills as 
follows : 

Senate Bill No. 55 passed, 36 to 
0, introduced by Senator William 
Duffy, Louisville, enabling city of 
Louisville to submit a bond issue of 
not to exceed $1,000,000 for the; 
benefit of University of Louisville; 
Senate Bill No. 44, passed, 34 to 0, 
introduced by Senator H. M. Cline, 
Whitley City, providing that fines 
and forfeitures in fifth-class cities 
go to the city treasury instead of to 
the state; Senate Bill No. 3 passed, 
25 to 2, introduced by Senator New- 
ton Bright, Eminence, making fees 
of licensing embalmers $25. 

A heated discussion preceded the 
tabling, 22 to 15, of Senate Bill No. 
29, introduced by J. Forest Porter, 
Webster county, which would make 
it unlawful to sell, expose for sale, 
give away or give as a prise or re- 
ward a toy pistol or other device for 
exploding caps or wafers containing 
fulminate or other explosives. 

Governor Fields sent the appoint 
hient of Dr. V. A. Stilley, Benton, 
to bo a member of the State Board 
of Health to ucceed the late Dr. D. 
W. Richmond, and the appointment 
was confirmed, 28 to 1. 

William G. McAdoo will be invit- 
ed to address the General Assembly, 
according to a joint resolution adopt- 
ed by the Senate. 



? denjugh 



That education spreads as* the 
material and mechanical aids and 
adjuncts to civilization increase and 
improve is o bvious to the most unob- 
serving. Every increase of transpor- 
tation has spread education, becaure 
it has increased the need for educa- 
tion. Every new invention which 
largely affects civilization increases 
both the need for education and the 
means for obtaining it. 

A man of a century ago, could he 
come to life, would find himself at 
a loss, even were he well educated 
according to the standards of his 
time. He could not compete nor keep 
up with those to whom the telephone 
electric light, railroad train, S-ray, 
writing and calculating machine, trol 
ley, automobile air ship, submarine 
and telegraph are matters of com- 
mon daily knowledge. 

Now comes the newest wonder, 
radio, to add its quota to education 
And he would be a wise man indeed, 
who would be willing to venture how 
far radio will go in the spread of 
education. Unquestionably the broad 
casting station and the receiving set 
are yet in their infancy, yet their 
use is already .widespread. An i 
there is a constantly increasing de- 
mand for something else than mere 
amusement. Concerts please, jazz 
bands provide music for home danc- 
ing, but the serious lecture, the 
course in home economics, the 
speech on thrift and banking, the 
reading from great books, are all in- 
creasingly popular, according to re- 
ports from the great broadcasting 
stations. 

Bringing, as it does, to the most 
remote hamlet, the most isolated 
farm house, the very newest and 
best in th^nght the radio may well 
be regarded not only as a miracle of 
modern science but a willing servant 
in carrying education where as yet 
it is but little konwn. 



FAKE STOCK SWINDLERS 



Less livestocf on Kentucky farms 
and lower values, compared to Jan. 
1923, are shown in the annual Jan. 
livestock report for Kentucky issued 
here today by the Kentucky office of 
the U. S. Department of Agriculture,' 
division of crop and livestock esti- 
mates. The value of livestock on 
Kentucky farms on Jan. 1, 1924, is 
estimated to be approximately $81,- 
340,000 compared to $94,207,000 a 
year-ago, $91,493,000 two years ago, 



i-nti'-e .-rmmpr »Vj ♦« „. -j ycm-B^u, *i)i,4»a,uuu two years ajro, 

oi.; .;; «; ' ^'^ v ^, a ;ar - ««d $127,369,000 Jan . 1 i 92 i. th., 



plus Irom which the three girls cai- 
i(d :'.c winter's stock. 

Believing that a curb should be 
put upon the establishment of small 



high schools in communities to"» 
small to maintain them properly, 
Virginia's State department of edu- 
cation, with the cooperation of the 
United States Bureau of Education, 
is making a study of high schools 
in two counties. From the result of 
this study it is expected to develep 
a policy favoring the estabishment 
lof schools maintained by counties 
rather than by districts. This should 
bring about larger and better schools 
in the opinion of the Virginia auth 
orities. 



is a decrease of $12,867,000 or about 
13.7 per cent in the total value of 
Kentucky farmers' livestock sinco 
Jan. 1, 1923. The decrease in the 
total value during the last year 
due to decreases in prices and in 
nubers of all kinds of livestock in 
the state except sheep, which have 
increased both in numbers and i 
average value per head since Jan. 
1, 1923. 

* In Kentucky milk cows show a 
decrease of not quite 1 per cent in 
numbers since Jan. 1, 1923; other 
cattle not quite 7 per cent decrease; 
swine, of all ages nearly 8 per cent 
decrease. 



HOG LOSS BIG 

FROM TUBERCULOSIS 

Of the 48,000,000 hogs slaughter- 
ed under Federal inspection last fiscal 
year about 15 per cent showed tu- 
berculosis infection to some extent. 
This entails a large food and mone- 
tary loss which can be prevented by 
using proper methods of tubercu- 
losis eradication and management. 
Cheap feed i Tuberculosis among other farm 
in western butter districts, and high j animals is recognized as a daugerous 



Prices of dairy products did not 
suffer as much from the drastic de- 
flation following the post-war period 
as did other farm products, says the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture. Butter, cheese, and milk 
have sold at prices remunerative to 
farmers. Butter is now higher than 
the general price level 



prices and some curtailment of pro- 
duction in milk districts, have enab- 
led dairy farmers to weather the 
storm with less adversity than far- 
mers producing' commodities a pari 
of which must be exported Poultry 
and eggs have continued on , fairly 
profitable basin. 



Claimed that church .,,,,, ,,, 

not properly attended, but no 
complaint Is made about the church 
■uppers. 



source of infection for hogs; leading 
packer* are now paying 10 cents per 
hundredweight additional for hogs 
originating In counties free or near- 
ly free from bovine tuberculosis. 

The United States Department of 

i Agriculture has bulletins for free dis- 

tnl.utum which Kive detailed mfor- 

' "nation en the prevention and eon 

• i "I hi i uberculoala. 



^i i 

t nuildinn 



Hall I- Dm 

hi the > 



The "get-rich-quick" desire of the 
human race makes gamblers or 
crooks of most of us. We live by ex- 
ample. Here and there some ma-; 
makes a good guess on the wheel of 
fortune in Wall Street and reaps 
riches. But he does it at the expense* 
of some "sucker" at the other end. 
Its a gambling game "within the 
law." If there were no "suckers" 
there would be no game — or at least 
very little of it. But the number of 
the gullible continues to increase to 
such an extent that, according to of- 
ficial records, the gullible public has 
been gold bricked of more than 
$500,000,000 by fake stock swindles 
outside of the big "exchanges" — 
and a good deal of this seems to be 
"within the law." In fact that seems 
to be the only difference between 
picking pockets or robbing banks- - 
and floating worthless stock secur- 
ities on a confiding and over-anxious 
public. The law prohibits one bub 
fails to reach the other. The whole 
legal aspect seems to hinge on the 
question of where or how to draw 
a ine — to distinguish between swin- 
dles and swindlers to protect the 
gentleman's game and prohibit the 
"rough stuff." As the matter now 
stands no federal action is probable 
and unless the people desire to con- 
tribute to the horde of sharpers there 
is but one remedy — don't monkey 
with the buzz-saw. 




iy I is for Zoe, going lo bed; 

Marching along with a resolute tread 

Fm J t*o other person*" Lo*«r left comer down, along edge of kimono; left tide 

bottom of kimono. 



r . 



THE CASE FOR THE ANTIS 

The Post does not propose to go : 
into any detail in answering the ar- 1 
gument's presented at Frankfort by j 
Judge Thurman and others in opp j- j 
sition to the submission of the $75,- j 
000,000 bond issue. 

The truth is that, while many of j- 
the arguments thus presented should 
be given due consideration by the I 
people at the referendum next No- 1 
vember, hardly any of them affect 
the only issue now before the Leg- 
islature, The question now is, shall 



With the High 
School Classics 

By MARGARET BOYD 

I n ii » n »'« «' «' « »««»«.■■. « » i t j 



(© by Margaret Boyd.) 

". . . your speech would betray 
ye*."— Speech on "Conciliation With 
America." 

When a man la hurried or excited 
he speaks the language of his youth. 
In this way speech betrays one's early 



the people be permitted to vote upon j nj e and training, 

this concrete plan for public ini-j It ia much easle , 

provement? The objectors at Frank- ! appearance than f0 dlsgulse one . B 

fort would have the Legislature de- j Bpe ech. One rarely _!' _-- -': ^.~ 

ny to the people the right to vote, I plttely away from | he i^. h " '#" one's 

although both of the political parties \ youth . T once h<Jard a man declara 

solemnly promised the people that that he could tell the state of the 

they would be extended that oppor- j Union from whlcn anvone came by 



Here's a new argument in favor 
of light wines and beers. It iscor,- 
tended that the depreciation of the 
French franc is due to our 18th 
Amendment because this market for 
t h e ir win es has been d es troy e d . Th o 
author of this statement contends 
that the people of the United ^States 
should be permitted to drink French 
wi les and tins ne!p France establish 
foreign credits and rehabilitate the 
fiaitc. We are now paying s«?v^ral 
millions; per year in taxes to help 
Franle. 



Secretary Mellon, admittedly one 
of the greatest financiers of this or 
any other nation, recently -wrote a 
little booklet called "Success" to 
boost the government's thrift week 
campaign. He advises* "Never buy 
stock of mines you know nothing 
about." fix* you buy property, buy 
near home." "Look with suspicion on 
c ffers with special inducements in 
cash discounts or stock bonuses." 
"Stock in companies being organiz- 
ed or. the success tf others rare'y 
tur s out well." Ar>.i yet there are 
thousands of "wis': gujs" who think 
they know better ♦hun Mr. Mellon, 
and back their opinions by contrib- 
uting to the sharks to the tune >t 
half a billion per year. 



There are now in the United State.) 
according to a Btatement by the De- 
part Mient of Agriculture, more than 
.'13,000 herds of cattle fuUy accredit- 
ed by the oGvernmeni as being 
free of tuberculoma, Indiana ha* the 
largest number of these herds, 4, ltd). 
Wisconsin stands next with 3,U(17, 
and Minnesota third with 3,075. 



tunity. 

Among those engaged in the dem- 
onstration at rrankfort against the 
submission of the bond issue were 
men for whom the Post entertains 
great respect and expects to continue 
to do so. There were mixed in with 
^those others whose purposes were 
purely destructive, and who are op- 
posed to this submission only be- 
cause they wish to injure the admin- 
istration of Governor Fields. But all 
who were at Frankfort had a right 
to be there. They were entitled to 
their day in court and their day 
before the Legislature. It is well that 
both sides be heard, and the Post 
never proposes to say unkind words 
about those who differ with it on 
public questions. 

Into the various arguments as ad- 
vanced we will not go other than 
noting our regret that some Ken- 
tuckians coming from counties that 
already have good roads express a 
lack of interest in the building of 
roads in Eastern and Western Ken- 
tucky. This is a mistake from every 
standpoint. The value of every acre 
in Central Kentucky would be in- 
creased by good roads to other parts 
of the State. — Louisville Post. 



The secret of cutting down on 
coal bills while at the same time im- 
proving health conditions is given 
by Dr. A. T. McCormack, secretary 
of the State Board of Health in urg- 
ing the people of Kentucky to aban- 
don the habit of hibernating during 
the winter and instead, keeping the t 
air in the home fresh and moist 
while at the same time comforably 
warm, 



"In these days of -high cost of coal, 
it is advantageous to know that air 
with — a plentiful supply ol_oisture 



feels warmer at 68 degrees than dry 
air at 74 degrees." said Dr. McCor- 
mack. "Dry air, such as is produce! 
by hot air furnaces and gas, creates 
an unhealthy state of the membranes 
of the nose and throat, makes us 
m nsative to the sudden changes in 
temperature and renders us subject 
to common colds, and inflamation of 
the air passages." 

"Fresh air is essential to healt'i. 
Many persons close their windows 
and doorr tight to conserve heat 
and save coal, but little do they 
realize that by so doing they are 
lowering their vitality ^nd making 
themselves subject to colds, bron- 
chitis and other infections of the air 
passages which will usually cost 
t more in doctor bills and medicine 
than the extra coal they might burn 
if they ventilated their rooms suffi- 
ciently. Even if they escape serious 
illness, headache, depression, loss of 
pnpetite and other annoying condi- 
tions will result from breathing dry, 
stale air." 

"Without the proper amount of 
moisture ourselves and our furni- 
ture will suffer. It in of advantage 
to nave a number of flowering plants 
in ferns around the house, which if 
properly watered will give off a con- 
siderable amount of moisture. Puns 
filled with water and placed upfi 
radiators, registers or stoves will 
give off a surprising amount of moia- 

t'4-C." 



hearing him talk for a few minutes. 
He Insisted that there were peculiari- 
ties of speech peculiar to each state, 
and that these peculiarities were 
never altogether outgrown. Few of 
us ever cultivate our powers of ob- 
servation to the point where we can 
distinguish slight variations of speech ; 
but most of us feel able to distinguish 
by his speech a man from the eastern 
or western or southern part of ear 
country. 

It la perhaps easier to learn a new 
language) than to correct one that bat 
been learned Incorrectly. I remember 
an Interesting example of the way in 
which the mind clings to the form 
first learned. Blspham, It will be re- 
membered, was an ardent advocate of 
music In English. I remember one 
occasion when he sang, "When I Was 
a Page," and sang It as only he could 
sing It. Then, to illustrate the superi- 
ority of music In a language known 
to the audience, he began to sing it 
In English. Everything went well un- 
til he reached a certain phrase, then 
his speech betrayed him into the Ital- 
ian. Chagrined, he tried several times 
to sing the aria through in English, 
but every time his speech betrayed 
him into the langauge In which he had 
so long sung. 

The speech of the majority of us Is 
influenced by the speech of our asso- 
ciates. This is especially true of chil- 
dren, and mothers are often able to 
tell with whom their children have 
1 been playing by the child's uncon- 
scious Imitation. 

Speech also tends to betray one's 
occupation and Interests and social 
status, as well ns one's childhood en- 
vironment and. one's associates. As 
Eliot puts It: 

Speech Is but broken lig-ht upon the 

J c p ll i of the u n s po k en . 




Better Than Traps For Rats 

Write* A<Um. DiWCo* Tens 

They ny : " RAT-SNAP ia dotnc the work 
and the rat undertaken are aa buBy as pop 
corn on a hot stove," Iky it on your rata. 
RAT-SNAP 1st "money back" guaranteed 
wire killer. Cornea ready for uae; no mix- 
ins with other feoda. Cata and doga won't 
touchit. Bata dry up and leave no amaU. 
Three aizea: SSo f or one room; 66e for 
bduae or chicken yard :tl.2S for barna and 
outbulldlnea. Start kiittns rata today. 

SoMandr.-ranteedto 

Guiley A Pettit, Burlington, Ky. 

D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky 



A Rat That Didn't Smell After 
, Being Dead for Three Months 

"I (wear it was de«4 three months. " writes Mr. J. 
Sykes(N.J). " I saw this rat every day: put some 
Rat-Snap behind a barrel. Months afterwards, my 
wile looked behind the barrel. There It waa — dead.'] 
Rat-Saap sells in tarn sizes (or 35c, 65c. tl.25. 
Said tad guaranteed by 

D. It. Blythe, Hurliugton, Ky. 
Uulley A Pettlt, Burlington, Ky 



The word "Adirondacks" is an In- 
dian word, meaning "wood-eaters," 
a derisive term given a defeated In- 
dian tribe who were driven to the 
mountains by the victorious Int 
quois and forced to ive there on ber- 
ries and bark. 



C. H. Y0UELL 

Farms for Sale 

At Bargain Prices. 
Burlington, Ky. 

Phone Turlington 65 



JAMES L. ADAMS 

DENTIST 

Cohen BailleMng 
PaVreStse**, Covingto.., K>. 



f . V. Kassebaum & Sn 

SRiKlTB I UIBU 

MONUMENTS, 

B Large 8to«!i on Dtepb« 
to Select from. 

Pneumatic Tool Equipme't 



11H Moan St 



t, 



AURORA, IND. 



RUFUS W. TANNER 

Auto Top Shop 

Florence, Ky. 

Auto Tops, Seat Covers and On^a 
Door Curtains for all make of csia. 



FURNITURE, BUGGIES A WAGONS 

Reupholatered, and Celrurwia* 

Lights Replaced. 



iftad 



People «■-» 

I ads In 
paper profit by them. 
The little* ads bring pfibm 
results. What have 
you for sale or want to 
to buy. the cost is too 
small to consider. 



J. C. GORDON 
Superintendent of Softools v . 

OF BOOHS COWNTY 

Will be In his offloe in BorKngAen 

the first and second limrth sj assi 

the third a-e* frnarffc Satordny 

in each moneh. 



You Can Trade 
the Article You 
Don't Need For 
Something You 
Do by (Adver- 
tising. 



N. F. PENN, M D 

Covington 
Ky.' 

We Test Eyes Right 

and 

Make Glasses That Fit 

st 

Reasonable Prices '" 

WITH MOTCH 613 MADISON AVE. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦WW 

TAXI TOUB COUNTY »A1 



READ YOUR 

COUNTY PAPER 

$1.50 The Year. 

Subeerrttr tor the RrT ORJ>»n. 
*♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦« 



wV 



FOR SALE 

BLUE GRASS FARM 



A fine Stock Farm, 162 acres, one 
mile from Burlington, Boone coun- 
ty, Ky., on pike, good 8 room honse, 
large concrete winter sun room, 2 
barns, other buildings, plenty water, 
splendid farm for Krass, corn and 
tobacco. Price, 118,000, buildings 
worth more than price of farm. For 
information, write or see 

D. B. Castleman, Firlanger, 
or Peter Buchert, Newpoot, Ky. 
jan 17-24 



For years Sarah Bernhardt would 
not consent so set foot in Berlin. 

Five times more fish are consum- 
ed in England than in Fran 



*" 




BJJBJ I :«fM*Jtt3*,t; 



■II ■ " 



BOONE COUNTY RECORLER 



page rrrm 



BOONE CO. RECORDER ' why should men elected 

Published every Thursday 

Tf. E. RIDDELL, Publisher. 



Foreign AdvertUinc Repreaentative 
: THE AMERICAN PRKSS ASSOCIATION 

Entered at the Postofflce, Burlinr- 
ton, Ky., as second-class mail. 

ADVERTISING RATES. 

Furaished on applicatioa. The 

rata* of the RECORDER a* aa ad- 
vertising medium is unquestioned. 
The character of the edvit is easoots 
now io its columns, end flee natnber 
of them, toll the whole story. 



The Recorder Stands For 
BETTER FARMING, BETTER CIT- 
IZENS, BETTER HOMES" 

This and That. 



TURN ME OVER 



Question is, if the boys all become 
experts, who will be left to pay for 
their advice? 

The income tax statute is a highly 
popular law among those who don't 
have to pay any. 

While the public admires flowers, 
some of these roses in people's cheeks 
look a bit overdone. 

J '* Many folks are not worrying ho 
■jjnuch about the lack of cash as their 
inability r get credit. 

Some folks have got along very 
well in politics by letting the other 
fellow do the talking. 

Being told that they should seek 
more light, some people immediately 
begin to chase after moonshine. 

New building undertaken in Unit- 
ed States in December shomed gain 
of 10 per cent over December 1922. 

Claimed this country needs more 
elevating influences, but some power 
still seems to keep prices elevated. 

Claimed there is a decline of auth- 
ority in these times, but the major- 
ity of husbands find they have uo 
mind. 

The trouble with many politicians 
is that they hold their ears to the 
ground so much that .they can't saw 
wood. 

It is not complained that many 
people are underestimating the'r 
losses in making out their income tax 
return. 

Some people feel It is not neces- 
sary to be handy with tools, as they 
can always hire mechanics to do re- 
pair jobs. 

Many people seem to be troubled 
with defective memory when they 
come to listing their income for the 
tax return. 

Some of these aspirant for office 
who can't get newspaper support 
think that the press is becoming a 
sroot danger. 

The nickel-in-the-slot radio has 
made its appearance and one can 
"listen in" on a concert without be- 
ing disturbed. 

Claimed that civilization is in dan- 
ger, and one would think so by the 
warhoops of the neighborhood kin 
playing Iddian. 

The early morning hours being 
considered extra hlalthy, some folks 
stay up all night so as to get the 
benefit of them. 

It is admitted that the present ago 
is decadent, but the young crwd arj 
doing their best to bring up their 
parents properly. 

A lot of the folks who claim that 
America is not prosperous are injur- 
ing themselves by over eating and 
too many luxuries. 

The folks who can't attend church 
now because it is too cold, may not 
be able to go next summer because 
it will be too warm. 

Claimed that character is the 
cause of all progress, but some of 
these motor speeders" make very f arr- 
id progress without it. 

There is talk in California of a 
law taxing batchelors over 28 years 
old. It seems hardly likely that 
the women will oppposc. 

Claimed the farmers should use 
more fertilizer, but perhaps some 
would do better if they fertilized 
more with elbow grease. . 

So far the sportsmen have not in- 
duced the government to let them 
deduct from their income the value 
tff the fish that got away. 

Many people are sensative about 
having their names in the newspa- 
pers, but the politicians do not ob- 
ject to being "mentioned" for office. 

It is urged that historic spots be 
commemorated, but it might save 
more lives if the spots of automobile 
accidents were all marked as warn- 
ings to speeders. 

We are advised by scientific man 
to brush our teeth, drink water and 
live to be 200 years old. That may 
sound good, but with rents and cost 
of iving getting greater the poor 
man would have to have a pension 
and then be buried by the county. 
What's the use? 

In explaining proposed tax reviH- 
ion Treasury Department nays: 
"When this country really geta ha -k 
tn a peace-time basis of taxation it 
is probable that, including normal 
and surtax, a total tax of 10 per 
tent will yield to the government the 
most revenue with the least disturb* 
ante to business. 



BY THE PEOPLE FEAR TO 
SUBMIT A QUESTIN TO 
THE PEOPLE? 

What principle controls those who 
urge the legislature not to submit 
the bond issue to the vote of the peo- 
ple? 

Do they think the members of tho 
legislature ought to arrogate them- 
selves the right to decide a matter 
of so grave importance to the state 
of Kentucky? 

Do they fear to trust the people, 
and therefore urge the legislature to 
deny to the people the opportunity 
to express their own desires upon 
this question, which is of major 
moment to the state? 

The legislature has no right under 
the law to authorize a bond issue 
It can submit a bond issue to the 
vote of the people. In morals it has 
no more right to refuse to submit 
the bill to the vote of the peop'.3 
thereby arrogating to itself the pow- 
er to prevent the issual of the bonds, 
than it has the right, to authorize the 
bond issue. 

Upon what ground do those mem 
bers of the legislature who were 
elected to represent the people just- 
ify action that would show fear and 
distrust of the people? 

What valid reason can any mem- 
ber of the legislature give to tho 
people for a vote to deny the peo- 
ple the opportunity to vote on a 
matter of paramunt importance, 
which opportunity they can secure 
only by the affirmative action of the 
members of the legislature? . 

All members of the legislature 
were elected by the people. Those 
who have faith in the people, who 
believe in the principles of demod- 
racy, who hafe confidence in the 
intelligence and patriotism of the 
voters, will vote to submit to the peo- 
ple the bond issue. 

Every member of the legislature 
received a majority of the votes cast 
in his district. Does any one of them 
take that as an indication of lack of 
intelligence on the part of the peo- 
ple? Does Representative W. P. Ar- 
dery, for instance, think that because 
the people of Bourbon cocnty voted 
for him they have not sufficient 
sense to decide whether they want 
the bind issue? We have confidence 
in the^inrolHo-ence of the citizens of 
Bourbon even if they did elect Mr. 
Ardery to the legislature. 

One of the newspapers has pub- 
IkHed a statement that there is ■« 
possibility of the bill to submit thi 
bond issue not being reported by the 
committee. We earnestly hope there 
is no foundation for that prediction. 
We hope every member of the leg- 
irlature will bo given the opportun- 
ity to show by his vote on this bill 
whether he trusts the people or does 
not trust them. 

There have been mass meetings 
held in several counties in which 
those who attended expressed strong 
opposition to the bond issue. * 

Do those who. J>»w«i attended these 
mass meetings fear to trust to the 
decision of the people this question, 
and therefore attempt to attoin their 
object by persuading or intimidat- 
ing the members of the legislature 
to deny to the people the chance to 
vote? 

Our government is founded on 
the rule of the people, not on the 
rule of a small number, who because 
of any purpose advocate or oppose 
a special course. We cannot surmise 
a valid excuse for any member of 
the legislature to refuse to vote tj 
give the people themselves a chance 
to say what they themselves desire, 
unless it is that that member of tho 
legislature fears or distrusts the in- 
telligence of the people who elected 
him to the legislature because of 
their action in so doing. — Lexington 
Herald. 

Washington, Jan. 30. — "The hand 
of fate is writing upon the wall that 
the Republican party has been weigh- 
ed in the balance, and found want- 
ing, sholted Senator A. O. Stanley, 
Democrat of Kentucky, on the sen- 
ate floor during debate over the Tea 
potpot Dome oil lease scandal. 

"Teapot Dome is a crucible in 
which the world is testing the capae 



ity and the ability of an administra 
tion. It is a crucible in which a great 
political organization is being tested 
and found to be dross. And that is 
why," Senator Stanley continued, 
"the Elephant is trembling from 
trunk to tail." 

Laughter and cheers from the 
Democratic side, and more laughter 
and cheers from the galleries greet- 
ed the shafts which the Kentucky 
senator flung at the principals In 
the lease scandal, and at times Pres- 
ident Cummins had difficulty In 
maintaining een a semblance of or- 
der. Twice during the bitter debate 
of which Senator Stanley's address 
was a part, the presiding officer was 
forced to warn the galleries against 
demonstrations. 



**%»*%»$?«*, 




^an never ^-R^fc 
ness js ffijrrl gq 




Those 

night attacks 
of coughing 

STOP the first coughing spell 
with Dr. Bell's Pine-Tar Honey 
— then sleep returns. Dr. Bell's 
contains just the medicines that 
your own doctor prescribes for 
coughs — combined with the old- 
time remedy, pine-taT honey, so 
soothing to inflamed tissues and 
pleasing to the taste. Keep Dr. 
Bell's in easy reach of all the 
family. 

All druggists. Be su.te.tn get 

DR. BELL'S I me-Tar Honey 



f 



,.**>.- a* *•> > A , 



Trade Wlrre They fill Trade 




The "Bttckey" brands of hicubators and broo lets are the unques- 
tioned leaders in their field ami enjoy a larger Bade than any 
line of incubators and brooders that has EVER been offered to th 
public. During the season of r92S-28 the sales of the Buckeye In- 
cubator Co, WERE LARGER THAN ITS THREE LARGEST 
COMPETITORS COMBINED. 

During the season of 1922-23 The Buckeye Incubator Co. EX- 
PORTED more incubators and brooders to foreign countries than 
ALL OTHER AMERICAN MANUFACTTRERS COMBINED. 
It is the only line on record that is giving universal satisfaction IN 
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD, regardlesa of climate or altitude 
During 1923 more than 175 million chicks wore hatched in 
Buckeye Incubators and more than 160 million chicks were raised 
under the Buckeye system of colony brooding. THAT'S A LOT 
OF CHICKS! 

Nearly every a^^'jltaral college in the Ur.:t:d States and 
Canade teach with Buckeys Incubatorsand brooders. On PageB 8, 
9 and 10 of our catalog you will find a list of these colleges. Look 
them over and see which college in your own state are using Buck- 
eyes. 

"Buckeye" is the standard by which all incubators and brood- 
ers are judged. Our competitors even CLAIM with considerable 
pride that their products are JUST AS GOOD as the "Buckeye" 

The Department of Rehabilitation of the United States Veter- 

ans'Bureati is using thousands of Buckeyes to teach the World War 

veterans the poultry business. 

More than 700,000 of the most successful poultry raisers in America use Buckeyes. Take a look 

through the testimonials in that interesting bucklet ofiours entitled "The Verdict of the User." and 

note how many of the big prize winners admit that the size and quality of their Buckeye-hatched 

chicks has been responsible in large part for their suocess. 

Sixteen hundred of the most successful baby-chick hatcheries in America are using BUCKEYE 
MAMMOTH INCUBATORS. These hatcheries have egg capacities from 60,000 up to a million, and 
up to date EVERY commercial hatchery equipped with Buckeyes has been a financial success. 
THAT'S SOME RECORD! 

The elimination of the nursery from Buckeye Incubators has saved the lives of millions of baby 
chicks. White diarrhea is an almost unknown quantity when the chicks are kept in a uniform tem- 
perature instead of subjecting them to the sudden ohill when they are dumped into the socalled nur- 
sery. (See Page 18 of the Buckeye catalog.) 

Buckeye ranks first in the point of sales and quality in every branch of our endeavor; Commer- 
cial incubators (upto600-egg size) coal-burning brooders, Mammoth Incubatorsand Blue-Flame 
Brooders. It is most unusual for any manufacturer to hold the lettdersnip in every item they build. 

The Buck Incubator Co. started in business over 36 years ago and has been at it continuously ever 
since. During this entire period we have been building the most efficient poultry-raising equipment 
on the market and have never hesitated to build and advocate thoBe devices which were better than 
those which had gone before— whether it was cur invention or not. 



BANG! 

The Campaign 
opens on 

Buckeyes 

Don't depend 

on the 
Uncertain Hen 



Incubators ~ $16.50 ro$107.00. 



Brooders $1 1.75 to 30.00 



"Do Rats Talk to Each Other?'' 
Asks Mr. M. Batty, R. I. 



jot five cakes of Rat-Snap and threw pieces 
en deac" 
ygot (< 
Now we haven't any. Who told them about Rat- 



• "I * 

around feed store. Got about half a dozen dead rata 
a day for two solid weeks. Suddenly, tbey got fewer. 



Snap." Rats dry i 
sues: 35c, 65c. $1.25. 

Sold sad guaranteed by 

Gulley & Pettft, Burlington, Ky. 
D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky. 




Ptiones 



"Covington's Largest Seedand Grocery House"- RETAIL 
19-21 Pike St. 18-20 West Seventh St. 

ou«h 335 and 336 COVINGTON, KENTUCKY. 

4 




FOR SALE 

Farm of forty-seven acres on He- 
bron pike near Limaburg, Kyi good 
house and all necessary outbuild- 
ings; electric lights; plenty of fruit 
and water. A beautiful home. 
I. DUNSON. 
n29 R. P. D. Florence, Ky 




Movies stt home! And von ran make 
them yourselves Some evening (when 
mother lets you sit up Inte) and you 
have lots of boys and girls to piny, try 
stretching a sheet across the room and 
in back of it put a strong light. .. Big 
candles or a lamp will do if you haven't 
gas or electricity. 

Now. divide the children Into two 
groups, and let one side be the 
"audience" and the others, the "actors." 
The actors must go in back of the big 
.sheet and stand between it ;ind tho 
light. They can make all sorts of funny 
motions of even rmVke up a little play. 
and their shadows on the sheet will 
look like regular movies to the little 
audience out in front. After they have 
done nil of Hmii- ntnnts 1ft ftin "anril. 




Coats Are Elaborate 




ence" he (he actors and try their tricks 
while the others are nmuserl. You c.in 
even invite the "grown-ups" to be the 
audience! 

Sugar Snaps for Little Chaps! 
Here's .•! little riVnty that's good to 
nibble when you want just a wee bite 
of something sweet. Susar snaps are 
so ensy to make that I'm sure big sister 
would be glad to hake them for you. 
Ask her to make them this way: 

1 cup hutter. 

2 cups susrar. * 

4 cups self-rising flour. 

1 egg. 
The mixture should be chilled before 
the dough Is rolled out. Roll thin. The 
oven should be quick, but not too hot. 
Bake about ten minutes. 



LARGE REQUEST MADE TO 

KENTUCKY MASONIC HOME 



Hickman, Ky.— Robert A. Tyler of 
this city, who died Jan. 13th, 1924, 
after making Rome small bequests to 
personal friends, willed the remain- 
der of his estate to the Masonic 
Widows and Orphans Home of Ken- 
tucky. It is estimated that the home 
will receive something in excess of 
$750,000. 

The act of the late Brother Tyler 
is indicative of a growing custom 
among Masons. In recent months n 
nupiber of very important bequests 
have been made to Masonic benevo- 
lent i 



"I Cot Real Mad when I Lost My 
Setting Hen," writes Mrs. Hanna, 
N.J. 

" Wfceti I went into our barn and found my best 
tetter dead I got real mad. One package of Rat- 
Snap killed »ix bit rata. Poultry raisers should use 
Rat-Snap." Comes in cakes, no mixing. No smell 
(rom dead rata. Threesbes. Prior*. 35c, toe, II .25. 
Sold and guaranteed by 

D. R. Blythe, Burlington, Ky. 
Gulley & Pettitt, Burlington, Ky 



The rich quality of pile fabrics in- 
vites elaboration— and elaboration Is 
the keynote of fall and winter styles. 
Here Is a dressy coat of pile fabric 
bordered with kolinsky fur and elabor- 
ated with generous portion of braid 
embroidery. A simulated girdle ends 
In a huge button a t e a c h s id e of t h e 



You will Appreciate 

The Services Rendered by 

PHILIP TALIAFERRO 

ot 

Erlanger, Ky. 



'&ttto^&&&^t&tt*r&W*Wi\ 



Established 1886. 



front. 



TTi*.r 


LU 


I 



MENTHOL COUGH DROPS 
for nose and throat 

Give Quick Relief 



IN THE CURIOSITY SHOP 

At present no protection is given 
to the whales, and these largest of 
all the earth's mammals often air 
killed while nursing their young. 

On a gravestone in a Burlington, 
(Vt.) cemetery is the following am- 
biguous tribute to a woman of that 
city, who died in 1 883: She lived 
with her husband Ml years, and died 
in the confident hope of a better 
lifs." 




cause many cases ft cons ti pat 
flatulence. headache, nausea. 
breath. sleepleaftneaa and emi 

tion. 
FREY'S VERMIFUGE 

iaa mU, old futiiooxi remedy if r 
worm*. In "•« '<* ov " • rvr,ll »- 
sWajraar*. 

SO c*ntt m botth 

or ssnt by mail as 

ntBY 

Hi. 



•I four dW*n. 
r»o«M*of jmm. 

^ tfc tt&T 



Begin The 



N^ W YEAR 

RIGHT 



Opening a bank account is the most practical 
beginning. Adding to it gives you a comfortable 
and satisfied teeling of security. It also stimulates 
your energy and insures youc future, if you con- 
tinue in the same way. This bank inyites you to 
become a depositor and 

GROW WITH IT. 

Boone 60. Deposit Bank 

Burlington. Kentucky. 




Subscribe for the Recorder. 



A home hotel — comfortable, 
large, airy rooms. Clean and 
economical. A safe place for 
your wife or daughter. 



;;■."'"'".:■•.■■■■'■■- 



BOONE CO U N TY RECORDER 



PA&B WV 



f 



Florence, Ky 



Theatre 



Wr'lncr Reid. Bebe Daniel* and 
Conrad Nagel in 

"Nice People" 

with the star* named above 
is tori u ml to £t» good 

Saturday, Feb. 9th 

<))•<)>■» Walton in 

'The Untaxable" 

Tuesday, January 12th. 

Admission, 28c C&, 10c 



4 "\ 



FLORENCE. 

Mr- Chas. Kulton spent Saturday 
shopping in tho city. 

Mrs. John Hampton wa.- quite ill 
Friday and Saturday. 

Miss Ada Aylor spent Monda.v 
with Lloyd Aylor and family. 

Albert Lucas wife and two daugh- 
ters spent Sunday with Wm. Bushy 
and wife. 

William Collins and wife spent 
Sunday afteroon with (ha. Fulton 
and wife. 

Sam Sydnor, ol Covington, spent 
Saturday with his uncle, Ed. Sydnor 
and wife. 

Lee Craddoi k is quite poorly at 
the home of his father-in-law Wood 
Stephens. 

Mrs. Lou Thompson and Mrs 
Charles Myers spent Thursday ii. 
Cincinnati. 

Mrs. Arch Lucas spent Tuesday 
at her son's Elmer Lucas and family 
of Fellevue. 

Mrs. Chas. Tanner and son Harryy 
apent Sunday afternoon with Mrs. 
Lucy Tanner. _ 

Mrs. Media Tanner snpent on? 
day last week with her sister Mrs. 
Lucy Tanner. 
V M« Chis Tanner spent a couple 
\of days last week with her mother, 
Mrs. Lucy Tanner. 
^SMrs. L, Childress, of Erlanger, 
spent Tuesday with Mrs. Charles 
Craven and family. 

John Blacker and wife, of Coving 
ton, spent Sunday with her parents, 
John Swim and wife. 
X. Arch Marie and Jessie Lucas 
>|pent Saturday and Sunday with 
Bebert Lucas and family. 
—John Criswell wife and daughter 
Basel spent Sunday with Geo. Pitch- 
'-•■■•r and wife of Big Bone. 

There will be a business meeting 
at the Baptist church Saturday nigM 
Let every mesaber -attend... 

Mies Anna Carlf*" is. spg^J.-™ 
•evera! weeks in Cincinnati, guest of 
■ernieee, Mrs. Lillian Sayers. 

u!]l WM - W - of *• Baptist 
«arch meets Thursday, Feb. 7th', at 

"■• bom « •' Mrs. Owen Bradford. 

"wge Mtordar on account of the 
■onons illness of his grandmother. 

sicf?, Si TameT haa heem ^ ite 
sick at her home m Florence, but is 

somewhat improved at this writing. 
Mrs. Flora Poer and little daugh- 
ter spent the week-end with her 
parents Geo. Miller and wife of the 
Price pike. 

Carl Anderson and wife and Mrs 
Lwdi* SorreU spent Tuesday with 
then- parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward 
■Jiderson, of Limaborg. 
^ Several members from the Baptist 
Missionary Society went to Coving- 
ton to attend the Missionary Con- 
vention bei-g held there in one of 
the churches. 

Mr. J. W. Quigley and wife mov- 
ed last week to their new home down 
She Dixie and Tom Carpenter and 
wife moved into the house vacated 
* by Mr.' Quigley. 

NONPAR IEL PARK 



The children of Mamie Cahill »,il 
have measles. 

Ed. Kraus has been on the sick 
list the past week. 

Buster Scott has accepted a nice 
position in Cincinnati. 

Wilford Aylor has been >n the 
sick list the past week. 

Miss Irene Avior spent Saturday 
ia Cincinnati shopping. 

Miss Lucille Scott spent Sunday 
with Miss Helen Osborne. 

Robert Snyder made a business 
trip to Burlington Monday. 

Miss Ella May penney spent Sat- 
urday in Covington, shopping. 

Miss Mamie Robinson was tha 
guest Sunday of Miss Eva Renaker 

Miss Carrie Clark, of Covington, 
spent the week-end with home folks. 

Eobert Lucas spent Sunday at Dry 
Ridge, Grant connty with relatives 

Jack Renaker, of Covington, spent 
Sunday afternoon here with rela- 
tive*. 

Mrs. Chas. Aylor spent Friday 
her sister, Mrs. Matt Rouse of 
ianger. 

^Mrs. Ben Oborne and daughter, 
»n, spetn Thursday in Cincinnati' 
Wing. 
Mrs. Eli Surface spent Saturday 
afternoon with her daughter, Mn' 
Joseph Surface. 

Homer Jones and Paul ienuki r 
spent a few days the past week at 
Richmond, Ky. 

Lee Craddock has been on the 
slek fiat the past week at the home 
of Wood Stephana. 
Mrs. Mat Bradford sold last wwl 



to Alvin Dody a house and lot in 
Elsmere for $2,000. 

Mrs. Joe Baxter and daughter Min- 
nie, spent Thursday afternoon with 
Mrs. Edward Sydner. 

The many friends here regret to 
luar of Aunt Lucy Tanner heinv 
very ill the past week. 

Miss Allie Fay Sydner spent l.:?t 
Thursday with her grandmother, 
Mrs. Charles Cravens. 

Mrs. Leslie Sorrell spent Thursdr.y 
afternoon with Mrs. Carl Anderson 
of the Dixie Highway. 

Vernic Chipman and Miss Ella 
Halskle attended the theatre Sunday 
afternoon in Cincinnati. 
^ Mrs. M. G Martin and Mrs. John 
Hampton called on Mrs. Russell Mit- 
cheil Wcuiiesdu.v evening. 

Mr. Orvillc Woster, of Sanders 
Drive, sold his house to a gentleman 
from Covington, last week. 

Floyd Chipman accepted a n'.ce 
position in Cincinnati, last we^-k 
with the Icy Hot Pottle Co. 

Robert Snyder and wife spent last 
Thursday with John Rouse and wife, 
her mother being seriously ill. 

Mrs. Lloyd Aylor is eonveleseing 
very slowly with heart and nervous 
trouble the past few months. 

Pail Terris spent the week-end 
v.i;h his parents J. Terris and fam- 
ilv rf Diy Ridge, Grant county. 

The many friends of James Adams 
are glad to see him out after fhre > 
week's illness of tonsilitis fever. 

Robert Sydner of Shelby stre t, 
spent Friday afternoon with hi? 
sister, Mrs. Joe Baxter and family 

Chas. and Edward Carpenter de- 
livered their fine crop of tobacco on 
the market at Walton Wednesday, 

Lawrence Kenney and wife had 
for their guests Sunday her parents, 
Joseph Scott and wife, of Florence. 
Miss Cora Stephens will leave 
this week to spend a few months in 
Florida and visit her son Lloyd and 
family. 

James C. Layne of the Dixie High- 
way, was called to Ashland, Ky., hat 
week by the death of his brother 
Dr. Layne. 

Mr. and Mrs. Cora Lail attended 
the funeral of her grandfather Mr. 
J. G. Callen, of Erlanger, Thursday 
afternoon. 

Guy Aylor and family of the Dixie 
Highway, enteftainea ai omner Sun- 
day Mike Knaley and family, of 
Gunpowder. 

Mrs. Mike Cahill and daughter 
Minnie, spent Sunday afternoon 
with Mamie Cahill and children, of 
Nbnpariel Park. 

Vernic Chipman, of Dayton, Ohio, 
was the guest Sunday of his parents 
rharles Chipman and wife of the 
Dixie Sighway. 

Miss Ella May Kenney, of Villa 
Madonna, apent the week-end with 
her parents, Lawrence Kennev and 
wife, of Tevon. 

Mrs. Henry Holtzworth and dangh 
ter spent Saturday with her parents 
Mr. and Mr*. Leonard Gibbs, of the 
Burlington pike. 

Jake Cleek of the Dixie Highway, 
will leave this week for Florida to 
spend a few weeks among the roses 
and enjoy a rest. 

Mrs. Ezra Tanner and Mrs., Alice 
Tanner, of Gunpowder, spent' last 
Thursday with Mrs. Lucy Tanner 
and daughter Cora. 

Joe Baxter and Joe R. Monger at- 
tended the Cleek hog sale Thursday 
of last week and purchased four cf 
his prize winning sows. 

Frank Syre, Jr., of Pittsbi-rg, 
Penn., arrived home to visit his par- 
ents. Dr. Frank Sayre, and wife of 
the Aixie Highway last week. 

A number from here attended a 
dance at Union Wednesday evening, 
given at the home of James Head.' 
A most enjoyable time waa spent. 

Wm. Arnold sold his place in Jjfon- 
pariel Park last week to Mr. Carpen- 
ter. Mr. Arnold will erect a new 
bungalow on his lot near Goodridge 
Drive. 

Ed. Chipman, of Williamstown, 
will arrive here this week to spend a 
few months with his brother Chas. 
Ghipman and workrat the carpenter 
trade. 

Misses Allie and Lucy Buckner, 
Erlanger, were callin g on Mr. 



Republican Convention. 

The Republicans of Boone County are requested to 
meet in mass convention at Burlington, Saturday, Februa- 
ry 9th, at one o'clock, tor the purpose of selecting delegates 
to attend the District Convention at Covington, and the 
State Convention at Louisville. 

A. R. EDWARDS, Chairman County Committee. 



Public Sale. 



Be-a-Hill-Customer It Pays 



I will sell at public auction at my residence near Bullitts- 
ville, Ky., on the Bullittsville & Dry Creek pike, 

Tuesday, February, 19th, 1924 

The Following Property: 
Aged Mule and Horse, Road Wagon and Harness, Hay- 
bed, Disc, Acme and Smoothing Harrow, Plows, Mowing 
Machine and Rake, Scaldingbox, Pitchforks, Buick Ma- 
chine, Cows, 2-h. Sled, Cider Mill, Single and Double trees 
Tobacco Sticks, Corn, Hay, Bedstead, Wash Stand, Feath- 
er beds, Mattresses, Bedding, Bolsters, Chairs, Rocking 
Chairs, Stands, Extension Table, Settee, Chiffonier, Fur 
Lap-Robe, and various other articles. 

TEKMS — All sums of $10.00 and under, cash; on sums over 
$10 00 a credit of six months, note with approved security, pay- 
able at Peoples Deposit Bank, Burlington, Ky. Three per cent 
discount allowed for cash. -— • 

MRS. IDA BALSLY. 

Saleto begin at 12:30 p. m. J. M EDDINS, Auctioneer. 



We Are Agents for Queen Incuba- 
tors and Brooders 

Higb Percentage Hatches 

with the Queen Incubator. 

Every one wants big hatches, and the QUEEN will deliver 
them. Besides being wonderfufly well construe!,, ."n Ifr'e way 
of materials and workmanship, the QUEEN embodies the most 
scientific principles of artificial incubation. 

The QUEEN is doubly insulated. First there are double 
walls of California red wood forming a dead air space. Second, 
corrugated strawboard is used between the wooden walls. 
Proper insulation adds considerable expense to the manafact- * 
uring eoBt, but it is an absolute requirement of a good incuba- 
tor. 

The QUEEN is the only incubalor thatcarries out the double 
red wood wall construction all around, and provides a double 
wall Iront In the way of two separate doors. The outer doer is 
a solid panel of red wood that is hinged entiroly independent of 
the inner door and is fastened with a sash lock that draws it 
tight, thiB making the losn of heai impossible. 

The inner door is also of red wood construction containing a 
panel of glass the full length and height of tho egg chamber. 

Queen Brooders are Good 
Step Mothers. 

They are designed to raise the chicks in all kinds of weather at 
any time of the year with complete protection day and night. 
The heating system gives an abundance of heat, distributed 
properly, while plenty of fresh air is provided automatically 
without draughts. 

WE SELL THE QUEEN BECAUSE WE ARE HERE TO STAY 
AND CANNOT AFFORD TO TRIFLE WITH YOUR EGOS. 
COME IN AND SEE HOW A QUEEN OPERATES, OR SEND FOR 
CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 



ANNUAL STATEMENT OF THE 

Farmers Mutual Fire Insurance Company 

OF BOONE COUNTY 

FOR THE YEAR 1923. 



Amount of Insurance in force Jan. 1, 1923 $2,702,180 

Amount of Insurance in force Jan. 1, 1924 _. 2 891 210 

EXPENDITURES FOR 1913. 

Losses Paid 777T777T. TTTTTT' 3,870.93 

Commissions to Collectors ... 

Officers and Lmployes tt 

Tax 

Adding Machine .,_ L 

Stove for office 

Printing and Supplies 



Northern Kentucky's 



LEADING GROCERS 
AND SEEDSMEN. 



49.24 
710.25 

16.38 

171.50 

7.75 

-39.64 



Cash Balance Jan. 1 1924. 



RECEIPTS FOR 1923 

Cash on hand Jan. 1, 1923 

Policy fees Collected .„ 

Assessments '.', 
Rent of Room 



$4,866.69 
1,282.17 
6,147.86 



lij; 



Be * Hill Customer | 

— It Pay* - 



mm 



i tii 



27- 29 PSXE ST -26 W.7»ST 

fa <3ao&r j>^*>r — Somt 



UML 



OOKKt 



m 






<•» ■"•■".•ii pi« 



., 1 468.17 

■ •••■<. 1,300.75 

••....••• • , 4,348.94 

"... , 30.00 

Total « , $6,147.8C 

The company has been in operation forty-five years and cost to 
policy holders has seldom been as much as $10.00 per $1,000 for five 
years insurance, and the past fiva years it has been exactly $7.20 per 
$11,°00. R. B. HUEY, 

Secretary 



* 

8 

5 
§ 
I 
5 

8 

* 



VULCANIZING. 



Complete line ot 

Springfield Tires and 
mobile and 



, Goodrich and Ksaty- 
■oocf Gc*~r» of Aoto- 
aadQaeases. 



A«tp 

GEORGE POKIER, 

BURUNGTON, KY. 



Neal wife and daughter Mrs. 
shall, of the Dixie Highway, Sunday 
afternoon. 

The many friends of Miss Delilah 
Florence, formerly of this place, but 
now of Hebron, surprised her many 
friends last Saturday by being mar- 
ried to Winfield Scott of Covington. 

Mrs. Chas. Chipman of the Dixie 
Highway, entertained Sunday after- 
noon Miss dinnie Baxter, MiBs Lucy 
and ' 



:ner, of ington 
. U. P\ M. < 

i. Mar- IS ill i 
Sundav JWm, 



RICHWOOD. 

Too late for last week 

L. D. Jackson is the sick list. 

Henry Dixon has moved into Iiij 
house. 

Small-pox here is being held ha 
check. 

Ben Toole and family have moved 
to Walton. 

Where is the man who predicted 
no winter? 

John Fleshner will move to Cov- 
ington in the spring. 

Grubbs, who has been seriouj- 



NOTICE 
To Delinquent Member* of Breeder* 
Mutual Fire and Lightning In- 
surance Company: 

Members who owe assessments aro 
hereby notified that unless such as- 
sessments are paid within the next 
thirty days legal steps will be taken 
to collect same. By order of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee. 

F. H. ROUSE, 

Secretary. 



Petersburg Theatre 

At Petersburg, Kentucky 

Saturday Night, Feb. 9th 



BUCK JONES IN 



"FOOTLIGHT RANGER" 



-COMEDY— 



"THE PIRATES" 

At Burlington, Kentucky, 



Miss Jennie Cleek' and Jd>« <">th- 

.„7 m t> u C i ner „ of Erh Hi: eri "e Fmnell located at Tampa, Fla., 

Lucas an*; report being delighted with their 

"Adopted home. 

Miss Mamie Robinson and brother ^ Mrs. B. Perry Tanner and daugh- 
near Riehwond ontD^. nn ^ _i * * -n «. 1 _~ ... "**."*" 



ger, 
children 



of near Richwood, entertained about 
thirty of their friends Monday ev- 
ening. The evening was spent with 
music and games. A most enjoyable 
evening waa spent together. 

Mrs. James C. Layne, Mrs. John 
hhephard and Miss Lucy Blackburn 
have returned home from Lexington 
where they attended the meeting lost 
week of the Executive Board of the 
State Federation of Women's Club. 

The many friends regret to hear 
of Mrs. Wm. Fickie (nee Jo*ie Cro- 
Ker) and daughter being seriously 
ill with typhoid fever at their home 
on the Diyie Highway. They have a 
nurse from Cincinnati. 



Martha Jane OigJer, widow of de- 
late Leonard CriffUr, died .it h.r 
home near Rabron, Sunday, Fbey . 
>, ii»24, in h.-r 82nd year. PtueraJ 
WM preached at Hebron Luth. 
church, Tu«»dlJ at 2 p. m |,. 
men! in the 



is some better 

Gatewood and family spent 
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Elmer 
Carpenter. 

Tobacco has been moving south to 
Walton, and a great deal north lo 
Cevington. 

Our town has got to be quite a 
coal center, as haulers from several 
towns are getting their coal here. 



NOTICbT 



ter will leave for Florida In a few 
days to join Mr. Tanner who has lo 






All persous indebted to the estate 
of J. J. Stephens, deceased, must 
come forward and settle at onoe, and 
those ha vin g claims against Bald es- 
tate must present them properly 
proven according to law to the un- 
dersigned L.L.STEPHENS. 

Burlington, Ky. 

NORTH BEND 

Mrs. Ernest Hensley is on the 
sick hat at this writing. 

Born to Lewis Hodges and wife, 
Thursday Jan. 31, a 13 pound boy. 

The school here has been closed 
several weeks on account of sickness 

Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Fogle are the 



Friday Night, Feb. 8th 

CHILDREN 10c. :-: ADULTS 25c 
War Tax Included Will Begin promptly at 7:30 



•GREAT 



cated near Bartow. 

TKil ... . . \ guests of their daughter, Mrs. Chas. 

ine contiued cold snaps causes usXiowman 

t .°. Watch our w °od and coal piles and J^Dr. C.' G. Crisler spent last Sun 



also our steps so that we may kee> 
our feet where they should be. 

Mrs. Jane B. Northcutt, aged 75 
years and 6 months, passed away 
Tuesday the 22nd, after a brief ill- 
ness. Funeral services were held at 
the Mt. Zion M. E. church by Rev. 
Mr. Baker, Wednesday and inter- 
ment at the Hopeful cemetery. Mrs. 



day with his parents, Dr. and Mm. 
R. H. Crisler. 

Donald Ogden, of East Bend, is 
visiting friends and relatives in this 
neighborhood. 

Several farmers of this neighbor- 
hood finished stripping their, tobac- 
co the past week. 

Messrs. Stanley Parsons and Har- 



Reduction Sale 

NOT A MAKE BELIEVE BLrT AN HONEST 
TO GOODNESS SALE. PRICES REDUC- 



— ■ — — -■» —*.•«.• j. mm. »■<■'»'»• uMMiivjr i omnia ana nar- 

Northcutt was the. daughter of the rp Munts called on Johnnie and Joe 
late Samuel and S. Anne DobbinO>Green Thursday evening. 
ami a sister of the late D. B. Dob- jXCharles Utsinger. Jr.', of Nortn 
bins. She leaves to mourn her lo a : Bend, Ohio, spent several days with 
Hters, Mrs. Anne Hammond relatives here the past week. 



and Mtm. Fannie Snow and two broth 
< r* James and Wm. Tobbins. Mr*,. 
North.uit was beloved by all ami 
n christian woman, a member of the 
Mi. /.ion M I church for nearly 63 
years, and we will all miss her. 



J. O. Bonta, Howard Kjrkpatnck, 
Rue Wingate afd Stanley Bonta, 
■sent Saturday and Sunday at Har 
rodsburg and other points in tho 
Blue Grass country. 




ED ON ALL 



SUITS AND OVERCOATS 

Mackinaw*, Coat Swaatars, Pullov-n, Kiwa"^ 
( Pantt and Corduroy Goods. . frt^ 

If you are in need of clothing take advantage of the bar- 
gains we are offering in this sale. 



60S Madison Avenue, 



Waohs 

COV INGTON, KY. 



.>».■ 



— — ^^^^ 



BOONE COUNTY RECORDER 



PACE 



Public Sale 



Having decided to quit farming I will offer for sale on E. H. 

Blankenbeker's farm, on the Burlington and Union 

road, one mile west ,of Qunpbwder, on 



Tuesday, 




12th, 1924 



•m 



pperty: 

Team of black Mares, sound and gobi workers, weigh 3 100 lbs.; Bay Mare 
8 yrs-old safe for momen and children to drive; 4 No. 1 Jersey Cows; 2 and 
3 years old; Jersey Bull 2 yrs-old; Big Poland China Sow, will farrow by 
day of sale; Boar, Top Spring